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Health IT Leaders Struggle With Mobile Device Management, Security

Posted on January 30, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new survey on healthcare mobility has concluded that IT leaders aren’t thrilled with their security arrangements, and that a significant minority don’t trust their mobile device management solution either. The study, sponsored by Apple device management vendor Jamf, reached out to 550 healthcare IT leaders in the US, UK, France, Germany and Australia working in organizations of all sizes.

Researchers found that 83% or organizations offer smartphones or tablets to their providers, and that 32% of survey respondents hope to offer mobile devices to consumers getting outpatient care over the next two years.  That being said, they also had significant concerns about their ability to manage these devices, including questions about security (83%), data privacy (77%) and inappropriate employee use (49%).

The survey also dug up some tensions between their goals and their capacity to support those goals. Forty percent of respondents said staff access to confidential medical records while on the move was their key reason for their mobile device strategy. On the other hand, while 84% said that their organization was HIPAA-compliant, almost half of respondents said that they didn’t feel confident in their ability to adapt quickly to changing regulations.

To address their concerns about mobile deployments, many providers are leveraging mobile device management platforms.  Of those organizations that either have or plan to put an MDM solution in place, 80% said time savings was the key reason and 79% said enhanced employee productivity were the main benefits they hoped to realize.

Those who had rolled out an MDM solution said the benefits have included easier access to patient data (63%), faster patient turnaround (51%) and enhanced medical record security (48%). At the same time, 27% of respondents whose organizations had an MDM strategy in place said they didn’t feel especially confident about the capabilities of their solution.

In any event, it’s likely that MDM can’t solve some of the toughest mobile deployment problems faced by healthcare organizations anyway.

Health organizations that hope to leverage independently-developed apps will need to vet them carefully, as roughly one-quarter of these developers didn’t have privacy policies in place as of late last year. And the job of selecting the right apps is a gargantuan one. With the volume of health apps hitting almost 260,000 across the Google and Apple app marketplaces, it’s hard to imagine how any provider could keep up.

So yes, the more capabilities MDM systems can offer, the better. But choosing the right apps with the right pedigree strikes me as posing an even bigger challenge.

E-Patient Update:  You Need Our Help

Posted on January 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I just read the results of a survey by Black Book Research suggesting that many typical consumers don’t trust, like or understand health IT.

The survey, which reached out to 12,090 adult consumers in September 2016, found that 57% of those interacting with health IT at hospitals or medical practices were skeptical of its benefit. Worse, 87% said they weren’t willing to share all of their information.

Up to 70% of consumers reported that they distrusted patient portals, medical apps and EMRs. Meanwhile, while many respondents said they were interested in using health trackers, 94% said that their physicians weren’t willing or able to synch wearables data with their EMR.

On the surface, these stats are discouraging. At a minimum, they suggest that getting patients and doctors on the same page about health IT continues to be an uphill battle. But there’s a powerful tactic providers can use which – to my knowledge – hasn’t been tried with consumers.

Introducing the consumer health IT champion

As you probably know, many providers have recruited physician or nurse “champions” to help their peers understand and adjust to EMRs. I’m sure this tactic hasn’t worked perfectly for everyone who’s tried it, but it seems to have an impact. And why not? Most people are far more comfortable learning something new from someone who understands their work and shares their concerns.

The thing is, few if any providers are taking the same approach in rolling out consumer health IT. But they certainly could. I’d bet that there’s at least a few patients in every population who like, use and understand consumer health technologies, as well as having at least a sense of why providers are adopting back-end technology like EMRs. And we know how to get Great-Aunt Mildred to consider wearing a FitBit or entering data into a portal.

So why not make us your health IT champions? After all, if you asked me to, say, hold a patient workshop explaining how I use these tools in my life, and why they matter, I’d jump at the chance. E-patients like myself are by our nature evangelists, and we’re happy to share our excitement if you give us a chance. Maybe you’d need to offer some HIT power users a stipend or a gift card, but I doubt it would take much to get one of us to share our interests.

It’s worth the effort

Of course, most people who read this will probably flinch a bit, as taking this on might seem like a big hassle. But consider the following:

  • Finding such people shouldn’t be too tough. For example, I talk about wearables, mobile health options and connected health often with my PCP, and my enthusiasm for them is a little hard to miss. I doubt I’m alone in this respect.
  • All it would take to get started is to get a few of us on board. Yes, providers may have to market such events to patients, offer them coffee and snacks when they attend, and perhaps spend time evaluating the results on the back end. But we’re not talking major investments here.
  • You can’t afford to have patients fear or reject IT categorically. As value-based care becomes the standard, you’ll need their cooperation to meet your goals, and that will almost certainly include access to patient-generated data from mobile apps and wearables. People like me can address their fears and demonstrate the benefits of these technologies without making them defensive.

I hope hospitals and medical practices take advantage of people like me soon. We’re waiting in the wings, and we truly want to see the public support health IT. Let’s work together!

Top 3 Tips for Taking on Digital Health

Posted on January 18, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Brittany Quemby, Marketing Strategist of Stericycle Communication Solutions as part of the Communication Solutions Series. Follow & engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms
Brittany Quemby - Stericycle
The other day I deleted several apps from my mobile phone. One I had downloaded when I was traveling, one took up too many gigs on my phone, and the last was one I downloaded to track specific health activities last January probably hoping to achieve one of my many New Year’s resolutions.  This happens to me all the time – I download an app or tool, use it once or twice, realize I don’t have any use for it or haven’t used it in 3 months and end up deleting to free up space on my phone.

This got me thinking about digital technology in the healthcare industry. Unfortunately, every day there is a slew of digital health tools developed that take a lot of time, money and effort and then go unused by the user for a variety of reasons. I picture something like a digital health tool graveyard that exists somewhere in the cloud.

After I got the mental image of a technology version of the Lion King’s Elephant Graveyard out of my head, I began to ask myself why so many digital heath technologies went stale. What needed to change? The time, money, and beautiful design that is put into development won’t draw patients by the masses.  The thing about digital health is that there has to be something in it to evoke a user’s actions.  Below are 3 important strategies I believe we need to all keep in mind when taking on digital health:

1. What does the patient EXPECT?

It’s no surprise that patients want technology incorporated into their healthcare.  However, it’s essential to couple the right technology with appropriate expectation of the user.  What you THINK a patient expects, might not always turn out to be the case.  According to a recent study by business and technology consulting firm West Monroe Partners, 91 percent of healthcare customers say they would take advantage of mobile apps when offered.  However, according to an Accenture report, 66% of the largest 100 US hospitals have consumer-facing mobile apps, 38% of which have been developed for their patients, and only 2% of patients are actively using these apps. When users are met with digital health technology that lacks the expected user experience, they are left feeling disappointed, unfulfilled, and begin looking elsewhere for services.

2. What does the patient WANT?

Patients are longing for a consumer experience when it comes to their healthcare.  New research shows that “patients today are choosing their providers, in part, based on how well they use technology to communicate with them and manage their health,” says Joshua Newman, M.D., chief medical officer, Salesforce Healthcare and Life Sciences.  Patients crave technology, customization and convenience.  There is no doubt that digital health tools satisfy the convenience factor.  However, they are nothing without a customized experience. Limiting your interactions with patients to an out-of-the-box, one-way digital communication strategy can be disadvantageous and could mean you aren’t reaching patients at all.  Digital health that is personalized, optimized, and sent through multi modalities allows you to be sure that you are engaging your patient in a way they want.

3. Where does the patient GO?

It’s no surprise that patients expect a consumer experience when it comes to interacting with their healthcare provider. But mastering digital health must include more than just mobile apps and the doctor’s office.  A digital health strategy that connects with patients across the entire continuum of care will optimize their experience and satisfaction.  In a recent study by West Monroe Partners called No More Waiting Room: The Future of the Healthcare Customer Experience, Will Hinde, Senior Director says “we’re starting to see more providers incorporate the digital experience with their office visit, by shifting to more online scheduling of appointments, paperless office interactions, following up via email, portals, and mobile apps and taking steps towards greater cost and quality transparency.”  Connecting with patients outside of the doctor’s office and in places where they frequent most allows for better changes of engagement, leading to greater experiences.

Tackling digital health can be daunting and unsuccessful if it’s looked at solely from the angle that technology is king. Looking at it from the lens of the patient becomes less intimidating and more likely that your digital health efforts don’t end up in the Elephant Graveyard.

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality call center & telephone answering servicespatient access services and automated communication technology. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

IBM Watson Partners With FDA On Blockchain-Driven Health Sharing

Posted on January 16, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

IBM Watson Health has partnered with the FDA in an effort to create scalable exchange of health data using blockchain technology. The two will research the exchange of owner-mediated data from a variety of clinical data sources, including EMRs, clinical trial data and genomic health data. The researchers will also incorporate data from mobiles, wearables and the Internet of Things.

The initial project planned for IBM Watson and the FDA will focus on oncology-related data. This makes sense, given that cancer treatment involves complex communication between multispecialty care teams, transitions between treatment phases, and potentially, the need to access research and genomic data for personalized drug therapy. In other words, managing the communication of oncology data is a task fit for Watson’s big brain, which can read 200 million pages of text in 3 seconds.

Under the partnership, IBM and the FDA plan to explore how the blockchain framework can benefit public health by supporting information exchange use cases across varied data types, including both clinical trials and real-world data. They also plan to look at new ways to leverage the massive volumes of diverse data generated by biomedical and healthcare organizations. IBM and the FDA have signed a two-year agreement, but they expect to share initial findings this year.

The partnership comes as IBM works to expand its commercial blockchain efforts, including initiatives not only in healthcare, but also in financial services, supply chains, IoT, risk management and digital rights management. Big Blue argues that blockchain networks will spur “dramatic change” for all of these industries, but clearly has a special interest in healthcare.  According to IBM, Watson Health’s technology can access the 80% of unstructured health data invisible to most systems, which is clearly a revolution in the making if the tech giant can follow through on its potential.

According to Scott Lundstrom, group vice president and general manager of IDC Government and Health Insights, blockchain may solve some of the healthcare industry’s biggest data management challenges, including a distributed, immutable patient record which can be secured and shared, s. In fact, this idea – building a distributed, blockchain-based EMR — seems to be gaining traction among most health IT thinkers.

As readers may know, I’m neither an engineer nor a software developer, so I’m not qualified to judge how mature blockchain technologies are today, but I have to say I’m a bit concerned about the rush to adopt it nonetheless.  Even companies with a lot at stake  — like this one, which sells a cloud platform backed by blockchain tech — suggest that the race to adopt it may be a bit premature.

I’ve been watching tech fashions come and go for 25 years, and they follow a predictable pattern. Or rather, they usually follow two paths. Go down one, and the players who are hot for a technology put so much time and money into it that they force-bake it into success. (Think, for example, the ERP revolution.) Go down the other road, however, and the new technology crumbles in a haze of bad results and lost investments. Let’s hope we go down the former, for everyone’s sake.

An Intelligent Interface for Patient Diagnosis by HealthTap

Posted on January 9, 2017 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

HealthTap, an organization that’s hard to categorize, really should appear in more studies of modern health care. Analysts are agog over the size of the Veterans Administration’s clientele, and over a couple other major institutions such as Kaiser Permanente–but who is looking at the 104,000 physicians and the hundreds of millions of patients from 174 countries in HealthTap’s database?

HealthTap allows patients to connect with doctors online, and additionally hosts an enormous repository of doctors’ answers to health questions. In addition to its sheer size and its unique combination of services, HealthTap is ahead of most other health care institutions in its use of data.

I talked with founder and CEO Ron Gutman about a new service, Dr. AI, that triages the patient and guides her toward a treatment plan: online resources for small problems, doctors for major problems, and even a recommendation to head off to the emergency room when that is warranted. The service builds on the patient/doctor interactions HealthTap has offered over its six years of operation, but is fully automated.

Somewhat reminiscent of IBM’s Watson, Dr. AI evaluates the patient’s symptoms and searches a database for possible diagnoses. But the Dr. AI service differs from Watson in several key aspects:

  • Whereas Watson searches a huge collection of clinical research journals, HealthTap searches its own repository of doctor/patient interactions and advice given by its participating doctors. Thus, Dr. AI is more in line with modern “big data” analytics, such as PatientsLikeMe does.

  • More importantly, HealthTap potentially knows more about the patient than Watson does, because the patient can build up a history with HealthTap.

  • And most important, Dr. AI is interactive. Instead of doing a one-time search, it employs artificial intelligence techniques to generate questions. For instance, it may ask, “Did you take an airplane flight recently?” Each question arises from the totality of what HealthTap knows about the patient and the patterns found in HealthTap’s data.

The following video shows Dr. AI in action:

A well-stocked larder of artificial intelligence techniques feed Dr. AI’s interactive triage service: machine learning, natural language processing (because the doctor advice is stored in plain text), Bayesian learning, and pattern recognition. These allow a dialog tailored to each patient that is, to my knowledge, unique in the health care field.

HealthTap continues to grow as a platform for remote diagnosis and treatment. In a world with too few clinicians, it may become standard for people outside the traditional health care system.

CVS Launches Analytics-Based Diabetes Mgmt Program For PBMs

Posted on December 29, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

CVS Health has launched a new diabetes management program for its pharmacy benefit management customers designed to improve diabetes outcomes through advanced analytics.  The new program will be available in early 2017.

The CVS program, Transform Diabetes Care, is designed to cut pharmacy and medical costs by improving diabetics’ medication adherence, A1C levels and health behaviors.

CVS is so confident that it can improve diabetics’ self-management that it’s guaranteeing that percentage increases in spending for antidiabetic meds will remain in the single digits – and apparently that’s pretty good. Or looked another way, CVS contends that its PBM clients could save anywhere from $3,000 to $5,000 per year for each member that improves their diabetes control.

To achieve these results, CVS is using analytics tools to find specific ways enrolled members can better care for themselves. The pharmacy giant is also using its Health Engagement Engine to find opportunities for personalized counseling with diabetics. The counseling sessions, driven by this technology, will be delivered at no charge to enrolled members, either in person at a CVS pharmacy location or via telephone.

Interestingly, members will also have access to diabetes visit at CVS’s Minute Clinics – at no out-of-pocket cost. I’ve seen few occasions where CVS seems to have really milked the existence of Minute Clinics for a broader purpose, and often wondered where the long-term value was in the commodity care they deliver. But this kind of approach makes sense.

Anyway, not surprisingly the program also includes a connected health component. Diabetics who participate in the program will be offered a connected glucometer, and when they use it, the device will share their blood glucose levels with a pharmacist-led team via a “health cloud.” (It might be good if CVS shared details on this — after all, calling it a health cloud is more than a little vague – but it appears that the idea is to make decentralized patient data sharing easy.) And of course, members have access to tools like medication refill reminders, plus the ability to refill a prescription via two-way texting, via the CVS Pharmacy.

Expect to see a lot more of this approach, which makes too much sense to ignore. In fact, CVS itself plans to launch a suite of “Transform Care” programs focused on managing expensive chronic conditions. I can only assume that its competitors will follow suit.

Meanwhile, I should note that while I expect to see providers launch similar efforts, so far I haven’t seen many attempts. That may be because patient engagement technology is relatively new, and probably pretty expensive too. Still, as value-based care becomes the dominant payment model, providers will need to get better at managing chronic diseases systematically. Perhaps, as the CVS effort unfolds, it can provide useful ideas to consider.

Columbia-Affiliated Physician Group Plans Rollout Of Mobile Engagement Platform

Posted on December 15, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A massive multispecialty medical practice associated with Columbia University has decided to implement a mobile patient engagement platform, as part of a larger strategy aimed at boosting patient satisfaction and ease of access to care.

The vendor behind the technology, HealthGrid, describes its platform as offering the physicians the ability to “provide actionable care coordination, access to critical health information and to enable [patient] self-care management.” HealthGrid also says that its platform will help the group comply with the requirements of Meaningful Use and MIPS.

The group, ColumbiaDoctors, includes more than 1,700 physicians, surgeons, dentists and nurses, and offers more than 230 specialty and subspecialty areas of care. All of the group’s clinicians are affiliated with New York-Presbyterian hospital and serve as faculty at Columbia University Medical Center.

The group is investing heavily in making its services more accessible and patient-friendly. In April, for example, ColumbiaDoctors agreed to roll out the DocASAP platform, which is designed to offer patients advanced online scheduling capabilities, including features allowing patients to find and book patients via mobile and desktop channels, tools helping patients find the best provider for their needs and analytics tools for business process improvement.

HealthGrid, for its part, describes itself as a CRM platform whose goal is to “meet patients where they are.” The vendor has developed a rules engine, based on clinical protocols, that connects with patients at key points in the care process. This includes reaching out to patients regarding needed appointments, education, medications and screening, both before and after they get care. The system also allows patients to pay their co-pays via mobile channels.

Its other features include automated mobile check-in – with demographic information auto-populated from the EMR – which patients can update from their mobile phones. The platform allows patients to read, update and sign off on forms such as HIPAA documentation and health information using any device.

While I’d never heard of HealthGrid before, it sounds like it has all the right ideas in place for consumer engagement. Clearly it impressed ColumbiaDoctors, which must be spending a fair amount on its latest addition. I’m sure the group’s leaders feel that if it increases patient alignment with treatment goals and improves the condition of the population it serves, they’ll come out ahead.

But the truth is, I don’t think anyone knows yet whether health organizations can meet big population health goals by interacting more with patients or spending more time in dusty back rooms fussing over big data analytics. To be sure, if you have enough money to spend they can both reach out directly to patients and invest heavily in next-generation big data infrastructure. However, my instinct is that very few institutions can focus on both simultaneously.

Without a doubt, sophisticated health IT leaders know that it pays to take smart chances, and ColumbiaDoctors is probably wise to pick its spot rather than play catch-up. Still, it’s a big risk as well. I’ll be most eager to see whether tools like HealthGrid actually impact patients enough to be worth the expense.

E-Patient Update:  Is Technology Getting Ahead Of Medical Privacy?

Posted on December 9, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I don’t know about y’all, but I love, love, love interacting with Google’s AI on my smartphone. It’s beyond convenient – it seems to simply read my mind and dish out exactly the content I needed.

That could have unwelcome implications, however, when you bear in mind that Google might be recording your question. Specifically, for a few years now, Google’s AI has apparently been recording users’ conversations whenever it is triggered. While Google makes no secret of the matter, and apparently provides directions on how to erase these recordings, it doesn’t affirmatively ask for your consent either — at least not in any terribly conspicuous way — though it might have buried the request in a block of legal language.

Now, everybody has a different tolerance for risk, and mine is fairly high. So unless an entity does something to suggest to me that it’s a cybercrook, I’m not likely to lose any sleep over the information it has harvested from my conversations. In my way of looking at the world, the odds that gathering such information will harm me are low, while the odds collection will help me are much greater. But I know that others feel much differently than myself.

For these reasons, I think it’s time to stop and take a look at whether we should regulate potential medical conversations with intermediaries like Google, whether or not they have a direct stake in the healthcare world. As this example illustrates, just because they’re neither providers, payers or business associates doesn’t mean they don’t manage highly sensitive healthcare information.

In thinking this over, my first reaction is to throw my hands in the air and give up. After all, how can we possibly track or regulate the flow of medical information falls outside the bounds of HIPAA or state privacy laws? How do we decide what behavior might constitute an egregious leak of medical information, and what could be seen as a mild mistake, given that the rules around provider and associate behavior may not apply? This is certainly a challenging problem.

But the more I consider these issues, the more I am convinced that we could at least develop some guidelines for handling of medical information by non-medical third parties, including what type of consumer disclosures are required when collecting data that might include healthcare information, what steps the intermediary takes to protect the data and how to opt out of data collection.

Given how complex these issues are, it’s unlikely we would succeed at regulating them effectively the first time, or even the fourth or fifth. And realistically, I doubt we can successfully apply the same standards to non-medical entities fielding health questions as we can to providers or business associates. That being said, I think we should pay more attention to such issues. They are likely to become more important, not less, as time goes by.

Vendor Study Says Wearables Can Promote Healthy Behavior Change

Posted on November 28, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new study backed by a company that makes an enterprise health benefits platform has concluded that wearables can encourage healthy behavior change, and also, serve as an effective tool to engage employees in their health.

The data from the study, which was sponsored by Mountain View, CA-based Jiff, comes from a two-year research project on employer-sponsored wearables. Rajiv Leventhal, who wrote about the study for Healthcare Informatics, argues that these findings challenge common employer beliefs about these type of programs, including that participation is typically limited to young and healthy employees, and that engagement with these rules can’t be sustained over time.

The data, which was drawn from 14 large employers with 240,000 employees, apparently suggests that wearable adoption and long-term engagement is possible for employees of all ages. The company reported that among the employers offered the wearables program via its enterprise health platform, 53% of employees under 40 years old participated, and 36% of employees over 50 years participated as well.

Jiff researchers also found that employee engagement had not measurably fallen for more than nine months following the program rollout, and that for one employer, levels of engagement have been progressively increasing for more than 18 months, the company reported.

According to Jiff, they have helped sustain employee engagement by employing three tactics:  Using “challenges,” time-bound immersive and social games that encourage healthy actions, “device credits,” subsidies that offset the cost of purchasing wearables and “behavioral incentives,” rewards for taking healthy actions such as walking a minimum number of steps per day.

The thing is, as interesting as these numbers might be — and they do, if nothing else, underscore the role of engaging consumers rather than waiting for them to engage with healthier behaviors on their own — the story doesn’t address one absolutely crucial issue, to wit, what concrete health impact are companies seeing from employee use of these devices.

I don’t think I’m asking for too much here when I demand some quantitative data suggesting that the setup can actually achieve measurable health results. Everything I’ve read about employee wellness initiatives to date suggests that they’ve been a giant bust, with few if any accomplishing anything measurable.

And here we have Jiff, a venture-backed hotshot company, which I’m guessing had the resources to report on results if it found any. After all, if I understand the study right, with their researchers had access to 540,000 employees for significant amount of time.  So where are the health conclusions that can be drawn from this population?

And by the way, no, I don’t accept that patient engagement (no matter how genuine) can be used as a proxy or predictive factor for health improvement. It’s a promising step in the right direction but it isn’t the real thing yet.

So, I shared the study with you because I thought you might find it interesting. I did. But I wouldn’t take it too seriously when it comes to signs of real change — either for wearables used for employee wellness initiatives. At this point both are more smoke than substance.

Are Healthcare Data Streams Rich Enough To Support AI?

Posted on November 21, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As I’ve noted previously, artificial intelligence and machine learning applications are playing an increasingly important role in healthcare. The two technologies are central to some intriguing new data analytics approaches, many of which are designed to predict which patients will suffer from a particular ailment (or progress in that illness), allowing doctors to intervene.

For example, at New York-based Mount Sinai Hospital, executives are kicking off a predictive analytics project designed to predict which patients might develop congestive heart failure, as well as to care for those who’ve are done so more effectively. The hospital is working with AI vendor CloudMedx to make the predictions, which will generate predictions by mining the organization’s EMR for clinical clues, as well as analyzing data from implantable medical devices, health tracking bands and smartwatches to predict the patient’s future status.

However, I recently read an article questioning whether all health IT infrastructures are capable of handling the influx of data that are part and parcel with using AI and machine learning — and it gave me pause.

Artificial intelligence, the article notes, functions on collected data, and the more data AI solution has access to, the more successful the implementation will be, contends Elizabeth O’Dowd in HIT Infrastructure. And there are some questions as to whether healthcare IT departments can integrate this data, especially Internet of Things datapoints such as wearables and other personal devices.

After all, O’Dowd notes, for the AI solution to crawl data from IoT wearables, mobile apps and other connected devices, the data must be integrated into the patient’s medical record in a format which is compatible with the organization’s EMR technology. Otherwise, the organization’s data analytics solution won’t be able to process the data, and in turn, the AI solution won’t be able to evaluate it, she writes.

Without a doubt, O’Dowd has raised some important issues here. But the real question, as I see it, is whether such data integration is really the biggest bottleneck AI and machine learning must pass through before becoming accessible to a wide range of users. For example, healthcare AI-based Lumiata offers a FHIR-compliant API to help organizations integrate such data, which is certainly relevant to this discussion.

It seems to me that giving the AI every possible scrap of data to feed on isn’t the be all and end all, and may even actually less important than the clinical rationale developers uses to back up its work. In other words, in the case of Lumiata and its competitors, it appears that creating a firm foundation for the predictions is still as much the work of clinicians as much is AI.

I guess what I’m getting to here is that while AI is doubtless more effective at predicting events as it has access to more data, using what data we have with and letting skilled clinicians manage it is still quite valuable. So let’s not back off on harvesting the promise of AI just because we don’t have all the data in hand yet.