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Top 10 Google Searches in 2014 – What Would Be Healthcare IT’s Top Searches?

Posted on December 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Each year Google releases it’s top trending searches in the US and the world. This list isn’t the most frequently searched terms (according to Google the most popular searches don’t change) but is a year versus year comparison of what terms were trending in 2014.

US Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
Flappy Bird
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
ISIS
Ferguson
Frozen
Ukraine

Global Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
Flappy Bird
Conchita Wurst
ISIS
Frozen
Sochi Olympics

Pretty interesting look into 2014. Also amazing that a mobile app (Flappy Bird) made the list for the first time. There’s two healthcare terms: Ebola and ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. I wondered what this list would look like for healthcare IT. So, I decide to take a guess at what I think would be the trending healthcare IT terms of 2014:

ICD-10 Delay
EHR Penalties
Wearables
Meaningful Use Stage 2
Epic
Obamacare
FHIR
Cerner-Siemens
HIPAA Breaches
Patient Engagement

What do you think of the list? Would you order it differently? Are there terms you think should be on the list?

Five Commonly Overlooked ICD-10 IT Transition Strategies

Posted on December 1, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Daniel M. Flanagan, Executive Consultant, Beacon Partners.
Daniel M. Flanagan, Executive Consultant, Beacon Partners
While some organizations have relaxed their approach to ICD-10 readiness given the October 1, 2015 extension, recent polls show that the majority of healthcare organizations remain woefully unprepared.  About 60% of healthcare systems and 96% of physician practices have not begun end-to-end testing according to recent surveys conducted by the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME) and Navicure, a leading claims clearinghouse. A lack of testing puts the ICD-10 transition at the greatest risk of failure.

ICD-10 readiness planning should remain a top priority because conducting a comprehensive gap analysis and the resulting remediation work will correct system vulnerabilities that will improve revenue cycle performance today.  However, systems performance improvement is time and resource-intensive and cannot be achieved at the last minute.

Below are five often overlooked transition planning steps:

  1. Update and complete your IT system inventory. We have helped several healthcare organizations prepare for ICD-10 and a common vulnerability is the absence of a complete and accurate IT inventory. Nearly one-third of organizations do not keep an inventory, and, of those that do, most are inaccurate. Many contain systems that are no longer in use and fail to reflect new or recently upgraded applications. Only a few organizations have had a complete IT inventory that accurately reflects all systems requiring end-to-end testing.  We often discover code-sensitive “orphan” applications and systems implemented by end-users without the IT department’s review and approval, which must be added to the inventory. An accurate IT inventory is critical to determine the extent of testing required, and to budget the time and expense needed to complete it.
  1. Review the number and functionality of all interfaces. Revenue cycle interfaces often contain the most critical code processing gaps and represent an organization’s greatest transition risk. For example, workflow analysis sometimes reveals unreliable processing of ICD-9 codes by billing system or other interfaces.  Extensive remediation is needed after the readiness assessment is completed in such cases.  Highly unreliable manual systems are also often used to process code, which impacts work that should be handled electronically. When conducting a workflow analysis, we sometimes find that experienced revenue cycle system end-users disagree about the design and functionality of long-standing systems and interfaces. Friction can arise between end-users and IT application specialists when interfaces do not work or appear not to work properly. Such issues can often be resolved quickly and objectively when a workflow analysis is performed early in the readiness planning process.
  1. Enlist the support of system end-users early to identify performance gaps and devise solutions. Readiness requires that any system that stores, processes, or uses diagnosis codes be identified and tested. However, it is easy to overlook some important performance gaps. In the majority of cases, end-users can readily identify performance gaps and recommend potential, practical solutions.  End-users can also be valuable in identifying potential solutions.  Involving end-users as early as possible in transition planning can avert wasted time.  For instance CDI, case management, as well as QA operating and reporting systems are heavily code-driven, but can be tough to “see,” especially if work is performed on paper. Enlisting end-users to identify code-impacted systems is a great way to ensure nothing is missed.
  1. Set a date to begin testing and verify that payers, clearinghouses, IT vendors, and others tied to your revenue cycle are ICD-10 compliant. End-to-end testing is vital to confirm ICD-10 readiness. Without testing, problem areas are not recognized and will not get fixed, which places the transition at the greatest of failure. Request that each payer and vendor confirm system compliance in writing and set a date when testing will begin.  In addition, we always recommend that our clients call and, if possible, visit key payers to confirm their readiness.   A payer’s inability to commit to a testing date is a warning sign that warrants immediate follow-up.
  1. Align transition efforts and resources with top priority goals. Transition planning will highlight performance improvement opportunities across a range of systems — including IT, revenue cycle, clinical documentation, quality assurance, and EMR.  The variety of performance improvement opportunities sometimes results in an organization creating more goals than needed for a successful transition. Supplemental initiatives can be overwhelming to achieve with restricted resources in a limited timeframe.  The key is to identify “mission critical” transition objectives and allocate scarce resources accordingly.  Define clear objectives and create a detailed plan to monitor progress for achieving each goal.  For example:
    • Revenue cycle performance: Create benchmarks and dashboards for Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that routinely report system performance now and after ICD-10 go-live.
    • IT: Validate system interfaces and upgrades, and perform testing to ensure confirmation of claim submission data flow. Testing results will provide valuable guidance to remediation efforts.
    • Clinical documentation: Establish a Clinical Documentation Improvement Program (CDIP) to audit provider documentation and coding. The initiative should be designed to provide ongoing training, as well as measure progress while ensuring data integrity, medical necessity, and billing compliance.

Although the deadline may have shifted, healthcare organizations need to stay on track to make the necessary IT and systems changes needed to optimize performance now and in the future.

About Daniel M. Flanagan
Daniel M. Flanagan is a seasoned healthcare executive with 28 years of leadership experience in the health system, physician practice and managed care fields. His primary interest has been performance improvement, especially in revenue cycle operations, improvement plan development and implementation and strategic planning, budgeting and implementation. Mr. Flanagan understands the challenges posed by today’s environment and is experienced in helping clients identify and capitalize upon opportunities to improve organizational performance.

Five Reasons to be Thankful for ICD-10

Posted on November 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Wendy Coplan-Gould, RHIA, Founder and President of HRS Coding.

It’s Thanksgiving weekend—a time for reflection and gratitude. Thoughts typically turn to family, friends, health, and life’s many other blessings. In addition to all of these, this Thanksgiving I suggest that the healthcare industry also include ICD-10 in our list of godsends. Here are five reasons why:

Reason #1:  To Code New Diagnosis, Procedures and Devices

The current ICD-9 coding nomenclature was developed in the 1970s. The healthcare industry can’t afford for this same system to be capturing data in the 21st century. We need the ability to specifically code new diseases, procedures and devices. For example, U.S. healthcare providers are unable to precisely code Ebola in ICD-9. That’s true.

There is no specific code for the diagnosis of Ebola in ICD-9, only a general code 078.89, other specific diseases due to viruses. In ICD-10, the code is A98.4, Ebola virus disease. This is the kind of data specificity that our nation needs and ICD-10 delivers.

Reason #2: To Help Keep Patients Safe through Better Data

ICD-10 also helps the healthcare industry capture and track data, and use it to ensure the safety of our patients. The inability to have specific data at our fingertips can be crippling to an institution and result in erroneous decisions based on faulty or imprecise data. Be thankful for ICD-10’s ability to accurately pinpoint diagnoses—and support more precise, exact patient care.

Reason #3: To Reduce Costs

Hospitals are strapped for money. Costs must be reduced whenever and wherever possible. ICD-10 will help hospitals properly bill for the services they deliver. With ICD-10 fully implemented and clinical documentation more granular, hospitals will experience fewer payer denials, claims audits and reimbursement appeals. Valuable time, money and resources will be saved over the long run.

Physician practices also have reason for thanks. New data published on the Journal of AHIMA website earlier this month suggests that the estimated costs, time and resources for offices to convert are “dramatically lower” than original estimates. According to the article, the actual conversion cost for a small practice ranges from $1,900 to $5,900, which is 92 to 94 percent less than initially predicted, resulting in a faster return on investment for your ICD-10 efforts.

Reason #4: To Improve Quality Scores and Performance Rankings

Setting aside zany codes and implementation barriers, ICD-10 is a blessing for quality reporting and performance scorecards. ICD-10’s code granularity works hand in hand with improved clinical documentation across all disciplines to help organizations achieve more accurate quality scores and competitive rankings. This is good news for hospitals and physicians alike.

For example, in ICD-9-CM, there is only one code (427.31) for atrial fibrillation.  In ICD-10-CM, physicians must specify the atrial fibrillation as paroxysmal (I48.0), persistent (I48.1) or chronic (I48.2), providing the specificity for a secondary diagnosis that can affect severity of illness scores and impact quality measures.

Reason #5: To Strengthen Hospital-Physician Relationships

ICD-10 is a bull’s-eye for governmental delay. And physician groups are usually the archers behind Congressional action against ICD-10. As recently as this week, physicians were pushing legislators to delay ICD-10 yet again. However, the tide may be turning.

In an effort to help their laggard physicians, many hospitals are reaching out to assist practices and groups in four key areas:

  • ICD-10 assessments
  • clinical documentation reviews
  • technology upgrades
  • physician-coder education

Helping physician practices with ICD-10 is an olive branch that must be extended to realize the full potential of ICD-10. Savvy organizations are using ICD-10 as a pathway to better hospital-physician relationships. Finally, AHIMA, MGMA and AMA have offered resources specifically designed to clear up common misconceptions and concerns physicians have about ICD-10.

No More Delays

It is estimated that the last delay cost the healthcare industry approximately $6.8 billion in lost investments, not including the cost associated with missed opportunities for better health data to improve quality of care and patient safety as mentioned above. Everyone from CMS to AHA, AMA, MGMA and HIMSS has endorsed the move to ICD-10 on October 1, 2015.

The rallying cry from hospital executives, IT directors and clinical coders is clear—no more delays! Even payers are pushing for the October 2015 date with a new consortium featuring Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Humana leading the charge. As Dennis Winkler from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan states, “ICD-10 is good for the industry. . . . It is in everyone’s best interest to work together and ensure readiness across the board.”

Be Thankful

In Mitch Albom’s 2009 New York Times best seller, Have a Little Faith, the author asks an 82-year-old rabbi to identify his secret to happiness. “Be grateful” is what the rabbi repeatedly claims to be the only true route to happiness.

So next time your executives, staff or physicians are complaining about the transition to ICD-10, remember the five reasons described above . . . and be thankful.

About Wendy Coplan-Gould
Wendy Coplan-Gould is the embodiment of HRS. She has led the HIM consulting and outsourcing company since 1979, through up and down economies and every significant regulatory twist and turn of the last three decades. Long-time clients and new clients alike are on a first-name basis with her and benefit from her focus on excellence, reliability and flexibility. She has been published in the Journal of AHIMA and other recognized publications, as well as conducted countless professional association presentations.

Prior to starting HRS, Wendy served as assistant director, then director, of Health Information Management at Baltimore City Hospital. She also was associate director of the Maryland Resource Center, which provided data for Maryland’s Health Services Cost Review Commission, an early adopter of the Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) methodology. Wendy is available via email: wendy@hrscoding.com.

6 Thanksgiving ICD-10 Codes

Posted on November 27, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I thought it fitting that AdvancedMD sent me 6 ICD-10 codes to be thankful for. Healthcare Humor…who doesn’t enjoy that? Happy Thanksgiving!

Y93.G3 Activity, Cooking and Baking
Ah, the turkey is roasting and the potatoes are boiling. And Cousin Carl just chopped the end of his finger off while preparing the veggie tray. He will earn this ICD-10 code, along with W26.0, Contact with Knife, to forever remember this year’s Thanksgiving…and that nasty scar.

W61.42 Struck by Turkey / W71.43 Pecked by Turkey / W61.49 Other Contact with Turkey
Thanksgiving isn’t Thanksgiving without a turkey. If three is a terrible mishandling of dinner’s main dish, or if a still-flapping gobbler enacts revenge, ICD-10 has three codes that are perfect for the season’s avian-related incident.

W21.01 Struck by Football
Another Thanksgiving staple is the good ol’ American sport of football. Usually, unless there is cheering for opposing teams, televised football games are safe enough. But a well-intentioned family flag-football game can result in a quick trip to the emergency room.

R63.2 Polyphagia (Overeating)
Parrots aren’t the only ones to watch out for this season. If a vampire or zombie takes their costume a bit too seriously, this code will record the chomp.

Y04.0 Assault by Unarmed Brawl or Fight
Black Friday shopping has become just as much a part of Thanksgiving as stuffing and pumpkin pie. But this mass hysteria for great deals doesn’t come without risks—especially when there are two shoppers and only one great bargain up for grabs. Get your extreme shopping skills up to snuff or Y04.0 and Y92.59, Other trade areas (mall) as the place of occurrence of external cause, may be jotted in your electronic health records.

W21.01 Lack of Adequate Sleep
No matter how we choose to celebrate Thanksgiving, few of us escape the meal prep, early morning shopping and family togetherness without a mild case of exhaustion. For those who try to do it all, there is an ICD-10 code for that.

Now I’m off to recover from my W21.01 and R63.2. Although, let me tell you, I had one of my best Turkey Bowl days ever. So much fun! Happy Thanksgiving everyone.

What Were The Best Practices and Benefits of Implementing a CDI Program at Baystate?

Posted on October 28, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently sat down with Walter Houlihan, Director of Health and Information Management and Clinical Documentation at Baystate Health, and Steve Bonney, EVP of Business Development and Strategy at RecordsOne to talk about the CDI (Clinical Documentation Improvement) program at Baystate Health. In the video below Walter and Steve talk about the savings that Baystate Health has received from their CDI program including how Walter has used dashboards, metrics and quality to convince senior management to increase Walter’s CDI staff from 4 FTEs to 10 FTEs so that they can review 100% of patients.

Steve and Walter also talk about how they use technology to make those 10 employees more efficient and make it possible for their CDI employees to work remotely.

How is your CDI program working? What technology are you using to make your CDI efforts more efficient? Have you had the success that Walter has had getting buy in from senior management?

Funny ICD-10 Codes Have Ruined the ICD-10 Branding

Posted on October 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The people at online physician community, QuantiaMD, recently sent me a list of the top 3 “Crazy ICD-10 Codes” that they got from their community. It was quite interesting to learn that when they asked their community for these codes, they yielded double the participation the company typically sees. No doubt, physicians have globbed on to these funny and crazy ICD-10 codes. I’ll be honest. I’ve gotten plenty of laughs over some of the funny ICD-10 codes as well. Seriously, you can’t make some of this stuff up. Here’s a look at the top 3 crazy ICD-10 codes they received (and some awesome color commentary from the nominators):

1. W16.221 – Fall into bucket of water, causing drowning and submersion. I didn’t realize mopping the floor was so dangerous!
2. 7. Z63.1 – Problems in relationship with in-laws. Really, Who does not?
3. V9733xD – Sucked into jet engine, subsequent encounter. Oops I did it again.

While these codes are amazing and in many respects ridiculous, they’re so over the top that they’ve branded ICD-10 as a complete joke. For every legitimate story about the value of ICD-10 there have probably been 10 stories talking about the funny and crazy ICD-10 codes. You can imagine which story goes viral. Are you going to share the story that talks about improvement in patient care or the one that makes you laugh? How come the story about their being no ICD-9 code for Ebola hasn’t gone viral (Yes, ICD-10 has a code for Ebola)?

Unfortunately, I don’t think the proponents of ICD-10 have done a great job making sure that the dialog on the benefits of ICD-10 is out there as well. Yes, it’s an uphill battle, but most things of worth require a fight and can easily get drowned out by humor and minutiae if you give up. If ICD-10 really is that valuable, then it’s well worth the fight.

My fear is that it might be too late for ICD-10. Changing the ICD-10 brand that has been labeled as a joke is going to be nearly impossible to change. However, there are some key people on the side of ICD-10. CMS for starters. If you can get the law passed, then the ICD-10 branding won’t matter.

One thing I do know is that doing nothing means we’ll get more and more articles about Funny ICD-10 codes and little coverage of why ICD-10 needs to be implemented. I encourage those who see the value in ICD-10 to make sure their telling that part of the story. If you don’t have your own platform to share that part of the story, I’ll be happy to offer mine. Just drop me a note on my contact us page.

A Few Thoughts After AHIMA About the HIM Profession

Posted on September 30, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This year was my 4th year attending the AHIMA Convention. There was definitely a different vibe this year at AHIMA than has been at previous AHIMA Annual Convention. I still saw the humble and wonderful people that work in the HIM field. I also still saw a passion for the HIM work from many as well. However, there seemed to be an overall feeling from many that they were evaluating the future of HIM and what it means for healthcare, for their organization, and for them personally.

This shouldn’t really come as a surprise. Think about the evolution that’s been happening in the HIM world. First, they got broadsided by $36 billion of stimulus money that slapped EHR systems in their organizations which questioned HIM’s role in this new digital world. Then, last year they got smashed by a few lines in a bill which delayed ICD-10 another year. It’s fair to say that it’s been a tumultuous few years for the HIM profession as they consider their place in the healthcare ecosystem.

While a little bit battered and scarred, at AHIMA I still saw the same passion and love for the work these HIM professionals do. I might add, a work they do with very little recognition outside of places like AHIMA. In fact, when EHR systems started being put in place, I think that many organizations wondered if they’d need their HIM staff in the future. A number of years into the world of EHRs, I think it’s become abundantly clear in every organization that the HIM staff still have extremely important roles in an organization.

While EHR software has certainly changed the nature of the work an HIM professional does, there is still plenty of work that needs to be done. We’d all love for the EHR to automate our entire healthcare lives, but it’s just not going to happen. In fact, in many ways, EHR software complicates the work that’s done by HIM staff. Remember that great HIM modules, features, and functions don’t sell more EHR software (more on that in future posts). Sadly, the HIM functions are often an afterthought in EHR development. We’ll see if that catches up with the EHR vendors.

As I’ve dived deeper into the life and work of an HIM professional, I’ve seen how difficult and detailed the job really can be. Not to mention, the negative consequences an organization can experience if they don’t have their HIM house in order. Just think about a few of the top functions: Release of Information, Medical Coding, Security and Compliance. All of these can have a tremendous impact for good or bad on an organization.

What is clear to me is that the HIM professional has moved well beyond managing medical records. If done well, the HIM functions can play a really important part in any healthcare organization. The challenge that many HIM professionals face is adapting to this changing environment. I see a number of real stand out professionals that are doing phenomenal things in their organization and really have an important voice. However, I still see far too many who aren’t adapting and many who quite frankly don’t want to adapt. I think this will come back to bite them in the end.

Practical Application of Watson with EHR

Posted on July 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Ever since Watson made its debut on Jeopardy, I haven’t been able to not check out what Watson was doing next. No doubt what Watson did on Jeopardy was impressive. However, it’s one thing to do what it did on Watson. It’s another thing to commercialize the Watson into something useful.

I’d long been hearing that Watson was going to be great for healthcare IT and that healthcare would really benefit from the technology. However, everything I saw felt very conceptual as opposed to practical and implemented. So, I was really interested in talking with Modernizing Medicine about their EHR integration with Watson.

You can find my interview with Daniel Cane and Dr. Michael Sherling, Founders of Modernizing Medicine, talking about Watson and some of the other cool ways they’re trying to help doctors make use of the data in an EHR in the video below. Plus, we even talk ICD-10 and MU 2 delay as well.

Note: Modernizing Medicine is a Healthcare Scene advertiser.

What Would Make Us Not Delay ICD-10 in 2015?

Posted on July 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While at the HFMA ANI conference in Las Vegas, I talked to a lot of people about the future of healthcare reimbursement. Talk of ICD-10 and the ICD-10 delay came up regularly with most of us rolling our eyes that ICD-10 was delayed again. Some argued that we still need to be prepared, but from what I’m seeing the majority of the market just pushed their plans out a year and will pick them up again later this year or early next year.

With that said, we all agreed that every organization will be much more hesitant preparing for ICD-10 next year since they’re afraid that ICD-10 will just be delayed again.

As I had these discussions, I started thinking about what will be different in 2015 when it comes to ICD-10? As I asked people this question, all of the same arguments that we made in 2014 are what we’re going to have in 2015. Some of them include: the rest of the world adopted this years ago, we’re falling behind on the data we’re capturing, we need more specificity in the way we code so we can improve healthcare, etc etc etc.

Considering these arguments, what will be different next year?

All of the above arguments for not delaying ICD-10 were valid in 2014 and we’ll be just as valid in 2015. Can you think of any reasons that we should not delay ICD-10 in 2015 that weren’t reasons in 2014? I can’t think of any. The closest I’ve come is that with the extra year, we’re better prepared for ICD-10. Although, given people’s propensity to delay, does anyone think we’ll be much better prepared for ICD-10 in 2015 than we were in 2014? In some ways I think we’ll be less prepared because many will likely think the delay will happen again.

Given that the environment will be mostly the same, why wouldn’t we think that ICD-10 will be delayed again in 2015?

Personally, I’ll be watching CMS and HHS closely and see what they say. I think this year they looked really bad when they very publicly proclaimed that ICD-10 was coming at HIMSS just to be hit from the side by the ICD-10 delay. I’d hope that this time CMS will work with Congress to know what they’re planning or thinking before they make such strong assertions. Of course, this would mean that they’d have to understand what Congress is thinking (not an easy task).

What’s unfortunate is that many of the things you need to do to prepare for ICD-10 can also benefit you under ICD-9. The smart organizations understand this and are focusing on clinical documentation improvement (CDI) as the best way to prepare for ICD-10, but still benefit from the program today.

ICD-10 Flight Delayed, But Keep Your Bags Packed – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on April 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Jennifer Bergeron, Learning and Development Manager at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Jennifer_web

If you’ve ever traveled to a country that doesn’t speak your native tongue, you can appreciate the importance of basic communication. If you learn a second language to the degree that you’re adding nuance and colloquialisms, you’ve experienced how much easier it is to explain a point or to get answers you need. What if you’re expected to actually move to that foreign country under a strict timeline? The pressure is on to get up to speed. The same can be said for learning the detailed coding language of ICD-10.

The healthcare industry has been preparing in earnest to move from ICD-9 coding to the latest version of the international classification of diseases. People have been training, testing and updating information systems, essentially packing their bags to comply with the federal mandate to implement ICD-10 this October — but the trip was postponed. On April 1, President Barrack Obama signed into law a bill that includes an extension for converting to ICD-10 until at least Oct. 1, 2015. What does this mean for your ICD-10 travel plans?

Despite the unexpected delay, you’ll be living in ICD-10 country before you know it. With at least another year until the deadline, the timing is just right to start packing and hitting the books to learn the new codes and to prepare your systems. For those who have a head start, your time and focus has not gone to waste, so don’t throw your suitcases back into the closet. The planning, education and money involved in preparation for the ICD-10 transition doesn’t dissolve with the delay – you’ve collected valuable tools that will be put to use.

Although many people, including myself, are disappointed in the change, we need to continue making progress toward the conversion; learning and using ICD-10 will enable the United States to have more accurate, current and appropriate medical conversations with the rest of the world. Considering that it is almost four decades old, there is only so much communication that ICD-9 can handle; some categories are actually full as the number of new diagnoses continues to grow. ICD-9 uses three to five numeric characters for diagnosis coding, while ICD-10 uses three to seven alphanumeric characters. ICD-10 classifications will provide more specific information about medical conditions and procedures, allowing more depth and accuracy to conversations about a patient’s diagnosis and care.

Making the jump to ICD-10 fluency will be beneficial, albeit challenging. In order to study, understand and use ICD-10, healthcare organizations need to establish a learning system for their teams. The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, provides training for caregivers and coders that eases learning challenges, such as the expanded clinical documentation and new code set for ICD-10. Simply put, there are people can help with your entire ICD-10 travel itinerary, from creating a checklist of needs to planning a successful route.

ICD-10 is the international standard, so the journey from ICD-9 codes to ICD-10 codes will happen. Do not throw away your ICD-10 coding manuals and education materials just yet. All of these items will come in handy to reach the final destination: ICD-10.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.