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New Service Brings RCM Process To Blockchain

Posted on October 6, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Much of the discussion around blockchain (that I’ve seen, at least) focuses on blockchain’s potential as a platform for secure sharing of clinical data. For example, some HIT experts see blockchain as a near-ideal scalable platform for protecting the privacy of EHR-based patient data.

That being said, blockchain offers an even more logical platform for financial transactions, given its origins as the foundation for bitcoin transactions and its track record of supporting those transactions efficiently.

Apparently, that hasn’t been lost on the team at Change Healthcare. The Nashville-based health IT company is planning to launch what it says is the first blockchain solution for enterprise-scale use in healthcare. According to a release announcing the launch, the new technology platform should be online by the end of this year.

Change Healthcare already processes 12 billion transactions a year, worth more than $2 trillion in claims annually.  Not surprisingly, the new platform will extend its new blockchain platform to its existing payer and provider partners. Here’s an infographic explaining how Change expects processes will shift when it deploys blockchain:

Change_Healthcare_Intelligent_Healthcare_Network_Workflow_Infographic

To build out blockchain for use in RCM, Change is working with customers, as well as organizations like The Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger project.

Hyperledger encompasses a range of tools set to offer new, more-standardized approaches to deploying blockchain, including Hyperledger Cello, which will offer access to on-demand “as-a-service” blockchain technology and Hyperledger Composer, a tool for building blockchain business networks and boosting the development and deployment of smart contracts.

It’s hard to tell how much impact Change’s blockchain deployment will have. Certainly, there are countless ways in which RCM can be improved, given the extent to which dollars still leak out of the system. Also, given its existing RCM network, Change has as good a chance as anyone of building out blockchain-based RCM.

Still, I’m wondering whether the new service will prove to be a long-term product deployment or an experiment (though Change would doubtless argue for the former). Not only that, given its relatively immature status and the lack of broadly-accepted standards, is it really safe for providers to rely on blockchain for something as mission-critical as cash flow?

Of course, when it comes to new technologies, somebody has to be first, and I’m certainly not suggesting that Change doesn’t know what it’s doing. I’d just like more evidence that blockchain is ready for prime time.

Top Five Challenges of Healthcare Cloud Deployments and How to Solve Them

Posted on October 2, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Chad Kissinger, Founder of OnRamp.

According to the HIMSS 2016 Survey, 84 percent of providers are currently using a cloud service, showing security and compliance issues are not preventing organizations from deploying cloud environments. Despite growing adoption rates, breaches and security incidents continue to rise. Cloud deployments and ongoing environment management errors are to blame. 

Cloud services offer clear benefits—performance, cost savings, and scalability to name a few—so it’s no wonder healthcare organizations, like yours, are eager to take advantage of all that the cloud has to offer. Unfortunately, vulnerabilities are often introduced to your network when you adopt new technology. Let’s discuss how to identify and overcome common challenges in secure, compliant cloud deployments so you can opportunistically adopt cloud-based solutions while remaining on the right side of the law.

1. Ambiguous Delegation of Responsibilities
When technology is new to an organization, the responsibility of finding and managing that solution is often unclear. You must determine who owns your data. Is it your IT Department? Or perhaps your Security Department? It’s difficult to coordinate different people across departments, and even more difficult to communicate effectively between your organization and your provider. The delegation of responsibilities between you and your business associate will vary based on your service model—i.e. software as a service, infrastructure as a service, etc.

To prevent these issues, audit operational and business processes to determine the people, roles, and responsibilities for your team internally. Repeat the process for those services you will outsource to your cloud provider. Your business associate agreement should note the details of each party’s responsibilities, avoiding ambiguity and gaps in security or compliance. Look for provider credentials verified by third-party entities that demonstrate security levels at the data center level, such as HITRUST CSF and SSAE 16 SOC 2 Type 2 and SOC3.

2.    Lack of Policies, Standards, and Security Practices
If your organization doesn’t have a solid foundation of policies, standards, and security practices, you will likely experience one or more of the security-related issues outlined below. It’s necessary to not only create policies, but also ensure your organization is able to enforce them consistently.

  • Shadow IT. According to a recent HyTrust Cloud Survey of 51 organizations, 40% of cloud services are commissioned without IT input.
  • Cloud Portability and Mobility. Mitigating risks among many endpoints, from wearables to smart beds, becomes more difficult as you add more end points.
  • Privileged User Access. Divide your user access by work role and limit access to mitigate malicious insider attacks.
  • Ongoing Staff Education and Training. Your team needs to be properly trained in best practices and understand the role that they play in cybersecurity.

Proper security and compliance also involves the processes that safeguard your data and the documentation that proves your efforts. Such processes include auditing operational and business processes, managing people, roles and identities, ensuring proper protection of data and information, assessing the security provisions for cloud applications, and data decommissioning.

Communicate your security and compliance policies to your cloud provider to ensure their end of the operations falls in line with your overall plan.

3. Protecting Data and Meeting HIPAA Controls
The HIPAA Privacy Rule, the HIPAA Security Rule, and HITECH all aim to secure your electronic protected health information (ePHI) and establish the national standards. Your concern is maintaining the confidentiality, availability, and integrity of sensitive data. In practice, this includes:

  • Technology
  • Safeguards (Physical & Administrative)
  • Process
  • People
  • Business Associates & Support
  • Auditable Compliance

Network solution experts recognize HIPAA compliant data must be secure, but also needs to be readily available to users and retain integrity across platforms. Using experienced cloud solution providers will bridge the gap between HIPAA requirements, patient administration, and the benefit of technology to treat healthcare clients and facilitate care.

Seek the right technology and implement controls that are both “required and addressed” within HIPAA’s regulations. When it comes to security, you can never be too prepared. Here are some of the measures you’ll want to implement:

  • Data encryption in transit and at rest
  • Firewalls
  • Multi-factor Authentication
  • Cloud Encryption Key Management
  • Audit logs showing access to ePHI
  • Vulnerability scanning, intrusion detection/prevention
  • Hardware and OS patching
  • Security Audits
  • Contingency Planning—regular data backup and disaster recovery plan

The number one mistake organizations make in protected data in a cloud deployment is insufficient encryption, followed by key management. Encryption must be FIPS 140-2 compliant.

4.    Ensuring Data Availability, Reliability, and Integrity
The key to service reliability and uptime is in your data backups and disaster recovery (DR) efforts. Data backup is not the same as disaster recovery—this is a common misconception. Data backup is part of business continuity planning, but requires much more. There’s a gap between how organizations perceive their track records and the reality of their DR capabilities. The “CloudEndure Survey of 2016” notes that 90% of respondents claim they meet their availability, but only 38% meet their goals consistently, and 22% of the organizations surveyed don’t measure service availability at all. Keep in mind that downtime can result from your cloud provider—and this is out of your control. For instance, the AWS outage earlier this year caused a ruckus after many cloud-based programs stopped functioning.

5.    Ability to Convey Auditable Compliance (Transparency)
Investors, customers, and regulators cannot easily discern that your cloud environment is compliant because it’s not as visible as other solutions, like on-premise hosting. You will have to work closely with your cloud provider to identify how to document your technology, policies, and procedures in order to document your efforts and prove auditable compliance.

Putting It All Together
The cloud provides significant advantages, but transitioning into the cloud requires a thorough roadmap with checkpoints for security and compliance along the way. Remember that technology is just the first step in a secure cloud deployment—proper security and compliance also involves the processes that protect your sensitive data and the documentation that proves your compliance efforts. You’ll want to identify resources from IT, security and operations to participate in your cloud deployment process, and choose a cloud provider that’s certified and knowledgeable in the nuances of healthcare cloud deployments.

For more information download the white paper “HOW TO DEPLOY A SECURE, COMPLIANT CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE.”

About OnRamp

OnRamp is a HITRUST-certified data center services company that specializes in high security and compliant hybrid hosting and is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. Our solutions help organizations meet compliance standards including, HIPAA, PCI, SOX, FISMA and FERPA. As an SSAE 16 SOC 2 Type 2 and SOC 3, PCI-DSS certified, and HIPAA compliant company, OnRamp operates multiple enterprise-class data centers to deploy cloud computing, colocation, and managed services. Visit www.onr.com or call 888.667.2660 to learn more.

HHS HIPAA Breach Wall of Shame Updated

Posted on August 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

HHS has recently updated the HHS Wall of Shame…I mean the HIPAA Breach Reporting Tool (HBRT). Whatever you want to call the tool, you can find the most updated version here. Here’s a short description from the press release about the updates to the breach notification tool:

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office for Civil Rights (OCR) today launched a revised web tool that puts important information into the hands of individuals, empowering them to better identify recent breaches of health information and to learn how all breaches of health information are investigated and successfully resolved. The HIPAA Breach Reporting Tool (HBRT) features improved navigation for both those looking for information on breaches and ease-of-use for organizations reporting incidents. The tool also helps educate industry on the types of breaches that are occurring, industry-wide or within particular sectors, and how breaches are commonly resolved following investigations launched by OCR, which can help industry improve the security posture of their organizations.

The new design is nice and it makes sense to finally archive some of the breaches on the list. How long should we condemn an organization that’s had a breach by having them on the list? Of course, it is still available on the archive.

Since the start of the HIPAA Breach notification tool (October 2009), there have been 1674 breach notifications (only includes breaches of 500 people or more). In just the last 24 months they’ve posted 364 breaches with nearly 28 million individuals affected. I’ll have to get my friends at Qlik to import the data to do more analysis of the data. Here’s a look at the data the tool provides:

The tool includes: the name of the entity; state where the entity is located; number of individuals affected by the breach; the date of the breach; type of breach (e.g., hacking/IT incident, theft, loss, unauthorized access/disclosure); and location of the breached information (e.g., laptop, paper records, desktop computer).

I wish they included more details on what caused the breach and more practical ways to defend against the various breaches. That would make the list a lot more actionable. However, I also understand why that would be a hard task to accomplish.

Just looking over some of the recent breaches, I wasn’t shocked by the number of hacking incidents that are being reported. We’ve widely reported on these types of hacking incidents as well. However, I was pretty shocked by how many of the recent breaches were by email. Once again, I wish I had a lot more information about what actually happened with these email breaches. Looks like HHS collects it when someone files a breach. I guess I understand why they can’t share the individual answers, but it would be nice to have some summary reports of actions taken by those that were breached.

What do you think of HHS’ updates to this tool? Is it useful in helping them reach their goal of making the industry safer? Is there something else they could do with the tool to make it work better? We look forward to reading your thoughts in the comments.

Business Associates are NOT Responsible for Clients’ HIPAA Compliance, BUT They Still Might Be At-Risk

Posted on August 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Mike Semel from Semel Consulting.

“Am I responsible for my client’s HIPAA compliance?”

“What if I tell my client to fix their compliance gaps, and they don’t? Am I liable?”

“I told a client to replace the free cable Internet router with a real firewall to protect his medical practice, but the doctor just won’t spend the money. Can I get in trouble?”

“We are a cloud service provider. Can we be blamed for what our clients do when using our platform?”

 “I went to a conference and a speaker said that Business Associates were going to be held responsible for their clients’ compliance. Is this true???”

I hear questions like these all the time from HIPAA Business Associates.

The answers are No, No, No, No, and No.

“A business associate is not liable, or required to monitor the activities of covered entities under HIPAA, but a BA has similar responsibilities as a covered entity with respect to any of its downstream subcontractors that are also BA’s,” said Deven McGraw, Deputy Director for Health Information Privacy, US Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR), Acting Chief Privacy Officer for the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. on August 17, 2017.

So, while you aren’t responsible for your clients’ HIPAA compliance, what they do (or don’t do) still might cost you a lot, if you aren’t careful.

In my book, How to Avoid HIPAA Headaches, there are stories about HIPAA Covered Entities that suffered when their Business Associates failed to protect PHI. North Memorial Health Care paid $ 1.55 million in HIPAA penalties based on an investigation into the loss of an unencrypted laptop by one of its Business Associates, Accretive Health.

Cottage Health, a California healthcare provider, is being sued by its insurance company to get $ 4.1 million back from a settlement after Cottage Health’s IT vendor, a Business Associate,  accidently published patient records to the Internet.

Your marketing activities; what you and your salespeople say to prospects and clients; and your written Terms & Conditions; may all create liability and financial risks for you. These must be avoided.

Semel Consulting works with a lot of Business Associates.

Many are IT companies, because I spent over 30 years owning my own IT companies. I’ve been the Chief Information Officer for a hospital and a K-12 school district, and the Chief Operating Officer for a cloud backup company. I now lead a consulting company that helps clients address their risks related to regulatory compliance, cyber security, and disaster preparedness. I speak at conferences, do webinars, and work with IT companies that refer their clients to us.

I look at the world through risk glasses. What risks do our clients have? How can I eliminate them, minimize them, or share them? When we work with our healthcare and technology industry clients, we help you identify your risks, and quantify them, so you know what resources you should reasonably allocate to protect your finances and reputation.

Under HIPAA, compliance responsibility runs one way – downhill.

Imagine a patient on top of a hill. Their doctor is below the patient. You are the doctor’s IT support company, below the doctor, and any vendors or subcontractors you work with are below you.

The doctor commits to the patient that he or she will secure the patient’s Protected Health Information (PHI) in all forms – verbal, written, or electronic. This is explained in the Notice of Privacy Practices (NPP) that the doctor gives to patients.

Under HIPAA, the doctor is allowed to hire vendors to help them do things they don’t want to do for themselves. Vendors can provide a wide variety of services, like IT support; paper shredding; consulting; malpractice defense; accounting; etc. The patient is not required to approve Business Associates, and does not have to know that outsourcing is happening. This flexibility is also explained in the patient’s Notice of Privacy Practices.

As a vendor that comes in contact with PHI, or the systems that house it, you are a HIPAA Business Associate. This requires you to sign Business Associate Agreements and, since 2013, when the HIPAA Omnibus Final Rule went into effect, it also means that you must implement a complete HIPAA compliance program and be liable for any breaches you cause.

IT companies may decide to resell cloud services, online backup solutions, or store servers in a secure data center. Since the HIPAA Omnibus Final Rule went into effect, a Business Associate’s vendors (known as subcontractors) must also sign Business Associate Agreements with their customers, and implement complete HIPAA compliance programs.

Because compliance responsibility runs downhill, the doctor is responsible to the patient that his Business Associates will protect the patient’s confidential information. The Business Associates assures the doctor that they, and their subcontractors, will protect the patient’s confidential information. Subcontractors must commit to Business Associates that they will protect the information. A series of two-party agreements are required down the line from the doctor to the subcontractors.

It doesn’t work the other way. Subcontractors are not responsible for Business Associates, and Business Associates are not responsible for Covered Entities, like doctors.

HIPAA compliance responsibility, and legal and financial liability, are different.

A HIPAA Covered Entity is responsible for selecting compliant vendors. Business Associates are responsible for selecting compliant subcontractors. Subcontractors must work with compliant subcontractors.

Because Covered Entities are not liable for their Business Associates, and Business Associates are not liable for their Subcontractors, they are not required to monitor their activities. But, you still need to be sure your vendors aren’t creating risks. The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) says that:

… if a covered entity finds out about a material breach or violation of the contract by the business associate, it must take reasonable steps to cure the breach or end the violation, and, if unsuccessful, terminate the contract with the business associate. If termination is not feasible (e.g., where there are no other viable business alternatives for the covered entity), the covered entity must report the problem to the Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights. See 45 CFR 164.504(e)(1).

With respect to business associates, a covered entity is considered to be out of compliance with the Privacy Rule if it fails to take the steps described above. If a covered entity is out of compliance with the Privacy Rule because of its failure to take these steps, further disclosures of protected health information to the business associate are not permitted.

In its Cloud Service Provider (CSP) HIPAA Guidance released in 2016, the OCR said:

A covered entity (or business associate) that engages a CSP should understand the cloud computing environment or solution offered by a particular CSP so that the covered entity (or business associate) can appropriately conduct its own risk analysis and establish risk management policies, as well as enter into appropriate BAAs.  See 45 CFR §§ 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(A); 164.308(a)(1)(ii)(B); and 164.502. 

Both covered entities and business associates must conduct risk analyses to identify and assess potential threats and vulnerabilities to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of all ePHI they create, receive, maintain, or transmit.  For example, while a covered entity or business associate may use cloud-based services of any configuration (public, hybrid, private, etc.),[3] provided it enters into a BAA with the CSP, the type of cloud configuration to be used may affect the risk analysis and risk management plans of all parties and the resultant provisions of the BAA.

How can a Business Associate be affected by a client’s compliance failure?  Here are some scenario’s.

(FYI, I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. These ideas came out of meetings I had with my attorney to review our contracts and our marketing. Talk to your lawyer to make sure you are protected!)

  1. IT companies should never tell your client, “We’ll be responsible for your IT so you can focus on your medical practice.”

Sound familiar? This is what many IT Managed Service Providers tell their prospects and clients.

Then the client has a data breach because they were too cheap to buy a firewall, they refused to let you implement secure passwords because it would inconvenience their staff, or they lost an unencrypted thumb drive even though you had set up a secure file sharing platform.

Someone files a HIPAA complaint, the OCR conducts an investigation, and your client pays a big fine. Then they sue you, saying you told them IT was your responsibility. Maybe they misunderstood what you included in your Managed Services. Maybe you did not clearly explain what responsibility you were accepting, and what IT responsibility was still theirs. Either way, you could spend a lot on legal fees, and even lose a lawsuit if a jury believes you made the client believe you were taking over their compliance responsibility.

  1. You must clearly identify what is, and what is not, included in your services.

Your client pays you a monthly fee for your services. Then they have a breach. They may expect that all the tasks you perform, and the many hours of extra labor you incur, are included in their monthly fee. They get mad when you say you will be charging them for additional services, even though they have just hired a lawyer at $ 500 per hour to advise them. Without written guidelines, you may not be able to get paid.

  1. You must be sure you get paid if your client drags you into something that is not your fault.

Imagine you were the IT company that set up an e-mail server for a recent presidential candidate. As unlikely as this may sound, this becomes a political issue. You just did what the client requested, but now you must hire attorneys to advise you. You must hire a public relations firm to deal with the media inquiries and protect your name in the marketplace. You must send your techs and engineers – your major source of a lot of income – to Washington for days to testify in front of Congress, after they spent more unbillable time preparing their testimony.

Who pays? How do you keep from losing your client? How do you protect your reputation?

HOW TO PROTECT YOUR FINANCES AND YOUR REPUTATION

  • Make sure you and your salespeople are careful to not overpromise your services. Make sure you and your sales team tell your prospects and clients that they are always ultimately responsible for their own security and compliance.
  • Make sure your contracts and Terms and Conditions properly protect you by identifying what services are/aren’t covered, and when you can bill for additional services. Don’t forget to include your management time when sending bills. Use a competent lawyer familiar with your needs to write your agreements and advise you on any agreements presented to you by others.
  • State in your Terms & Conditions that you will be responsible for your own company’s compliance (you are anyway) but that you are not responsible for your clients’ compliance.
  • Include terms that require your client to pay for ALL costs related to a compliance violation, government action, investigation, lawsuit, or other activity brought against them, that requires your involvement. Use a competent lawyer familiar with your needs to write your agreements and advise you on any agreements presented to you by others.
  • My attorney said we should include “change in government regulations” in our Force Majeure clause to allow us to modify our contract or our pricing before a contract expires. The 2013 HIPAA Omnibus Rule created a lot of expensive responsibilities for Business Associates. You don’t want to get stuck in an existing contract or price model if your costs suddenly increase because of a new law or rule.
  • Get good Professional Liability or Errors & Omissions insurance to protect you if you make a mistake, are sued, or dragged into a client’s investigation. Make sure you understand the terms of the policy and how it covers you. Make sure it includes legal representation. Ask for a custom policy if you need special coverage.
  • Make a negative a positive by promoting that you offer the specialized services clients will need in case they are ever audited, investigated, or sued.

If you do this right, you will protect your business and leverage compliance to increase your profits. When you focus on compliance, you can get clients willing to pay higher prices because you understand their compliance requirements. I know. I have generated millions of dollars in revenue using compliance as a differentiator.

About Mike Semel

Mike Semel is a noted thought leader, speaker, blogger, and best-selling author. He is the President and Chief Security Officer of Semel Consulting, focused on HIPAA (and other regulatory) compliance; cyber security; and Business Continuity planning. Mike is a Certified Business Continuity Professional through the Disaster Recovery Institute, a Certified HIPAA Professional, Certified Security Compliance Specialist, and Certified Health IT Specialist. He has owned or managed technology companies for over 30 years; served as Chief Information Officer (CIO) for a hospital and a K-12 school district; and managed operations at an online backup company.

Healthcare Orgs May Be Ramping Up Cybersecurity Efforts

Posted on August 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As I’ve noted (too) many times in the past, healthcare organizations don’t have a great track record when it comes to cybersecurity. Compared to other industries, healthcare organizations spend relatively little on IT security overall, and despite harangues from people like myself, this has remained the case for many years.

However, a small new survey by HIMSS suggests that the tide may be turning. It’s not incredibly surprising to hear, as health it leaders have been facing increasingly frequent cybersecurity attacks. A case in point: In a recent study by Netwrix Corp., more than half of healthcare organizations reported struggling with malware, and that’s just one of many ongoing cyber security threats.

The HIMSS cybersecurity survey, which tallies responses from 126 IT leaders, concluded that security professionals are focusing on medical device security, and that patient safety, data breaches and malware were their top three concerns.

In the survey, HIMSS found that 71% of respondents were allocating some of their budgets toward cybersecurity and that 80% said that their organization employed dedicated cybersecurity staff.

Meanwhile, 78% of respondents were able to identify a cybersecurity staffing ratio (i.e. the number of cybersecurity specialists versus other employees), and 53% said the ratio was 1:500 which, according to HIMSS is considered the right ratio for information-centric, risk-averse businesses with considerable Internet exposure.

Also of note, it seems that budgets for cybersecurity are getting more substantial. Of the 71% of respondents whose organizations are budgeting for cybersecurity efforts, 60% allocated 3% or more of their overall budget to the problem. And that’s not all. Eleven percent of respondents said that they were allocating more than 10% of the budget to cybersecurity, which is fairly impressive.

Other stats from the survey included that 60% of respondents said their organizations employed a senior information security leader such as a Chief Information Security Officer.  In its press release covering the survey, it noted that CISOs and other top security leaders are adopting cybersecurity programs that cut across several areas, including procurement and education/training. The security leaders are also adopting the NIST Cybersecurity Framework.

According to HIMSS, 85% of respondents said they conduct a risk assessment at least once a year, and that 75% of them regularly conduct penetration testing. Meanwhile, 75% said they had some type of insider threat management program in place within their healthcare organization.

One final note: In the report, HIMSS noted that acute care providers had more specific concerns was cybersecurity than non-acute care providers. Over the next few years, as individual practices merge with larger ones, and everyone gets swept up into ACOs, I wonder if that distinction will even matter anymore.

My take is that when smaller organizations work with big ones, everyone’s tech is set up reach the level better-capitalized players have achieved, and that will standardize everyone’s concerns. What do you think?

Despite Privacy Worries, Consumers Trust Apple With Their Health Data

Posted on August 14, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

These days, everyone seems to want access to consumer health data. We’re talking not just about healthcare companies, but also financial firms, insurance companies and technology giants like Apple, Google and Amazon.

Consumers have every reason to be concerned how their data is used, as companies outside of the healthcare realm, in particular, might use it in ways that make them uncomfortable. After all, these health-related companies may not have to follow HIPAA rules. Not only that, laws that govern data collection of any kind are still evolving on the state and federal level. It’s just not clear where privacy rules for health data are going.

Troubling ambiguities like these may be why 37% of the 1,000-plus people responding to a new Twitter poll said they wouldn’t share their data with anyone. Perhaps they’ve begun to realize that companies like Google could do a lot of harm if they act recklessly with the health data they’re accumulating.

Nonetheless, there’s at least one company they trust more than others with their PHI, according to the poll, which was conducted by a CNBC writer. That company is Apple, says columnist Christina Farr. When asked which companies they trust with the health data, 41% picked Apple. Meanwhile, Google and Amazon came in at 14% and 8% respectively. That’s a pretty big gap.

Why do consumers trust Apple more than other technology companies?  It’s far from clear. But Andrew Boyd, a professor of biomedical and health information sciences at the University of Illinois, suggests that it’s because Apple has taken steps to foster trust. “Apple has done a big push around health and privacy to breed familiarity and comfort,” Boyd told CNBC.

He noted that Apple has announced plans to make aggregated health information available on smartphones. Next, it plans to integrate other medical data, such as lab results, which usually aren’t part of an integrated health record, Farr points out. Apple has also promised users that it won’t sell health data to advertisers or third-party developers.

Ideally, other companies should be following in Apple’s footsteps, suggests health data privacy expert Lucia Savage, who responded to the Twitter poll.

Savage, who is currently serving as chief privacy and regulatory officer at Omada Health, believes that any company that collects health data should at least provide consumers with a summary of the data they collect on their users and promise not to sell it. (She didn’t say so directly, but we know most non-healthcare firms can’t be bothered with such niceties.)

I think we all look forward to the day when every company takes health data privacy seriously. But giants like Google, with effectively infinite resources, are still pushing the envelope, and we can only expect its competitors to do the same thing. Unless consumers mount a massive protest, or there’s a radical change in federal law, I suspect most non-healthcare firms will keep using health data however they please.

Healthcare Security Cartoon – Fun Friday

Posted on August 11, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday and school is beginning in a lot of places around the country. I know we’re ready for school to start in our house. They moved it up a couple weeks in Las Vegas and so we had a short summer, but we’re excited for the rhythm that school brings.

The last Friday in summer seems the perfect time for a Fun Friday blog post. This cartoon was shared by Fogo Data centers that highlights the always challenging balance between security and convenience.

Do your security policies seem a bit like this picture? Or do you edge on the other side of too convenient and not secure enough?

Healthcare Cybersecurity Cartoon – Fun Friday

Posted on July 21, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week’s Fun Friday comes from the #IoMTchat (Internet of Medical Things) and was shared by Rasu Shrestha. This cartoon has so many good elements including the great password sticky note. As in most humor, this isn’t too far from the truth.

Rasu is spot on in his tweet too. Key to cybersecurity in healthcare is understanding employee behaviors and motivators. You’ll never change the culture and improve cybersecurity if you don’t understand your employees’ needs.

One Hospital Faces Rebuild After Brutal Cyberattack

Posted on July 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Countless businesses were hit hard by the recent Petya ransomware attack, but few as hard as Princeton, West Virginia-based Princeton Community Hospital. After struggling with the aftermath of the Petya attack, the hospital had to rebuild its entire network and reinstall its core systems.

The Petya assault, which hit in late June, pounded large firms across the globe, including Nuance, Merck, advertiser WPP, Danish shipping and transport firm Maersk and legal firm DLA Piper.  The list of Petya victims also includes PCH, a 267-bed facility based in the southern part of the state.

After the attack, IT staffers first concluded that the hospital had emerged from the attack relatively unscathed. Hospital leaders noted that they are continuing to provide all inpatient care and services, as well as all other patient care services such as surgeries, therapeutics, diagnostics, lab and radiology, but was experiencing some delays in processing radiology information for non-emergent patients. Also, for a while the hospital diverted all non-emergency ambulance visits away from its emergency department.

However, within a few days executives found that its IT troubles weren’t over. “Our data appears secure, intact, and not hacked into; yet we are unable to access the data from the old devices in the network,” said the hospital in a post on Facebook.

To recover from the Petya attack, PCH decided that it had to install 53 new computers throughout the hospital offering clean access to its Meditech EMR system, as well as installing new hard drives on all devices throughout the system and building out an entirely new network.

When you consider how much time its IT staff must’ve logged bringing basic systems online, rebuilding computers and network infrastructure, it seems clear that the hospital took a major financial blow when Petya hit.

Not only that, I have little doubt that PCH faces doubts in the community about its security.  Few patients understand much, if anything, about cyberattacks, but they do want to feel that their hospital has things under control. Having to admit that your network has been compromised isn’t good for business, even if much bigger companies in and outside the healthcare business were brought to the knees by the same attack. It may not be fair, but that’s the way it is.

That being said, PCH seems to have done a good job keeping the community it serves aware what was going on after the Petya dust settled. It also made the almost certainly painful decision to rebuild key IT assets relatively quickly, which might not have been feasible for a bigger organization.

All told, it seems that PCH survived Petya successfully as any other business might have, and better than some. Let’s hope the pace of global cyberattacks doesn’t speed up further. While PCH might have rebounded successfully after Petya, there’s only so much any hospital can take.

A Programmatic Approach to Print Security

Posted on July 17, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sean Hughes, EVP Managed Document Services at CynergisTek.

Print devices are a necessary tool to support our workflows but at the same time represent an increasing threat to the security of our environment.

Most organizations today have a variety of devices; printers, copiers, scanners, thermal printers and even fax machines that make up their “print fleet”. This complex fleet often represents a wide variety of manufacturers, makes and models of devices critical to supporting the business of healthcare.

Healthcare organizations continue to print a tremendous amount of paper as evidenced by an estimated 11% increase in print despite the introduction of the EHR and other new systems (ERPs, CRMs, etc.). More paper generally means more devices, and more devices means more risk, resulting in increased security and privacy concerns.

Look inside most healthcare organizations today and even those with a Managed Print Services program (MPS) probably have a very disjointed management responsibility of their inventory. Printers are most often the responsibility of IT, copiers run through supply chain with the manufacturer providing support, and fax machines may even be part of Telecommunications. Those organizations that have an MPS provider probably don’t have all devices managed under that program – what about devices in research or off-site locations, or what if you have an academic medical facility or are part of a university?

These devices do have a couple of things in common that are of concern – they are somehow connected to your network and they hold or process PHI.

This fact and the associated risk requires an organization to look at how these devices are being managed and whether the responsibility for security and privacy are being met. Are they part of your overall security program, does your third party manage that for you, do you even know where they all are and what risks are in your fleet today?  If multiple organizations manage, do they follow consistent security practices?

Not being able to answer these questions is a source of concern and probably means that the risk is real. So how do we resolve this?

We need to take a programmatic approach to print and print security to ensure we are addressing the whole. Let’s lay out some steps to accomplish this.

  • Know your environment – the first thing we must do is identify ALL print devices in our organization. This includes printers, scanners, copiers, thermals, and fax machines, whether they are facility owned, third-party managed, networked or local, or sitting in a storage room.
  • Assess your risk – perform a comprehensive security risk assessment of the entire fleet and develop a remediation plan. This is not a one-time event but rather needs to be part of your overall security plan.
  • Assign singular ownership of assets – either through an internal program or a third-party program, the healthcare organization should fold all print-related devices into a single program for accountability and management.
  • Workflow optimization – you probably have millions of dollars of software in your organization that is the source of the output of these devices. Even more was spent securing the environment these applications are housed in, and accessed from, to make sure the data is secure and privacy is maintained. The data in those systems is at its lowest price point, most optimal from a workflow efficiency standpoint, and most secure — yet every time we hit print we multiply the cost, decrease the operational efficiency and increase the risk to that data.
  • Decrease risk – while it is great that we identify all the devices, assess and document risk and develop a mitigation/remediation plan, the goal should be to put controls in place to stem the proliferation of devices and ultimately to begin the process of decreasing the unnecessary devices thereby eliminating the risk associated to those devices.

The concept of trying to reduce the number of printers from a cost perspective is not new to healthcare. However, many have achieved mixed results, even those that have used an MPS partner. The reason that happens is generally because they are focused on the wrong things.

The best way to accomplish a cost-effective print program is to understand what is driving the need or want for printers, and that is volume. You don’t need a print device if you don’t need to print. I know it sounds like I am talking about the nirvana that is the paperless environment but I am not. This is simply understanding what and where is unnecessary to print and eliminating it, thereby eliminating the underlying need for the associated device, and with it the inherent security risk as well as the privacy concern of the printed page. Refocusing on volume helps us to solve many problems simultaneously.

Putting a program in place that provides this visibility, and using that data to make the decisions on device reduction can significantly reduce your current risk. Couple this with security and privacy as part of your acquisition determination, and you can make intelligent decisions that ensure you only add those devices you need, and when you do add a device it meets your security and privacy requirements. More often than not the first line of defense in IT is better management of the environment.