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6 Healthcare Incubators Growing the Future of HealthTech

Posted on October 30, 2014 I Written By

With the rapidly-growing demand for technologies that solve challenges for healthcare patients, professionals and institutions, many of the most innovative and disruptive solutions are coming not from large corporations, but small, scrappy startup companies.

With this trend has risen a group of startup “incubators” and “accelerators” specifically focused on healthcare technology entrepreneurs. These organizations serve as a launching pad for healthtech startups by facilitating high-value mentoring, collaboration and investor connections, plus basic needs like office infrastructure and seed funding.

For the startups, this gives them the time and resources to refine their technologies and services while finding investors and customers. Meanwhile the accelerators benefit by building local economies, solving healthcare challenges, and opening up highly-profitable opportunities for their backing investors

Below, we’ll introduce you to some of the leading incubators in the healthcare industry. These incubators have a proven track record in helping innovative young companies bring new ideas and services to consumers and businesses.

The Top-Six Healthcare Incubators and Accellerators

rockhealth

Rock Health – Rock Health invites early stage companies to work within the incubator and receive funding and mentorship from a variety of companies and health organizations. Rock Health notes that 18% of our economy is healthcare-based, but it’s one of the last industries to receive a tech makeover.  With more than 50 active startups in its portfolio, Rock Health is one of the most experienced healthcare incubators, especially for startups that focus on providing web services, mobile applications and SaaS solutions for healthcare providers and companies.

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Health Wildcatters – Health Wildcatters is a mentorship-driven healthcare seed accelerator in Dallas; slightly different than an incubator. Though similar to incubators in their goals, accelerators typically acquire a small amount of equity in a startup, then work quickly to help a company achieve a short-term goal like raising money or launching a product. While incubators house companies for months or years, accelerators like Health Wildcatters work in weeks. Health Wildcatters focuses mainly on early-stage healthcare technology startups, including IT,

SaaS, digital health and mobile health companies. Companies receive an initial seed investment and a 12-week program in which Health Wildcatters works quickly to help the company build value and refine its product. The name “wildcatter” hearkens back to independent oil entrepreneurs who were willing to take risks in where they drilled. Health Wildcatters takes the same approach to finding companies. This entrepreneurial approach allows it to help more startups reach their goals.

startup-health

StartUp Health –Chaired by TimeWarner CEO Jerry Levin, this incubator aims to fund 1,000 healthcare companies within the next decade to help transform the face of the healthcare industry. StartUp Health works to build sustainable growth in its companies over a three-year period. During the incubation period, StartUp Health matches companies with a network of more than 10,000 health professionals and business people focused on improving digital health and wellness.

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The Iron Yard – With its first location in Asheville, NC, the Iron Yard is growing a network of incubators focused on growing new areas of technology like digital health, green tech and emerging technologies. Its digital health accelerator, located in Spartanburg, SC, is working to turn one of the nation’s oldest railroad junctions into a hub for digital health innovation. The Iron Yard offers startups $20,000 in seed capital and three months of mentorship and workshops from experts in design, development and financing. The Iron Yard also offers training in web development and programming to place graduates with the startup companies it supports.

blueprint-health

Blueprint Health – Blueprint Health, located in New York City, is one of the largest incubators in any niche and offers an expansive network of healthcare mentors to assist healthcare entrepreneurs launch new ventures. Blueprint Health focuses on companies developing tech projects directly for hospitals, physicians and health plans rather than consumer-facing applications, which means deeper access to established customers. In 2013, Blueprint Health focused its efforts on mature startups companies. While many incubators assist early-stage companies, more than half of Blueprint’s mentees already had paying customers. With more than 12,000 sq. ft. of space and two classes per year, Blueprint Health is able to help more than 100 healthcare companies each year.

healthbox

Healthbox –  Healthbox offers accelerator programs in Boston, Chicago, Tampa, London, Nashville and Salt Lake City that provide  digital health entrepreneurs with funding and access to a global network of healthcare investors and providers. Healthbox launched its first accelerator program in Chicago in 2012 and quickly grew to other states and the UK. It recently expanded its business programs with $7 million in funding and started a program that helps hospitals create their own in-house Healthbox accelerator programs that, in turn, help companies gain traction within their own medical communities. So far, Healthbox has invested in 56 active startups, supported by a network of more than 350 expert mentors.

About the Author: David Vogel is a blogger for Datapipe, a leading provider of HIPAA-compliant hosting and managed cloud hosting. Connect with David on Twitter (@DavidVogelDotCo) and Google+ (+David Vogel).

The Shifting Focus to Patients, Really?

Posted on October 27, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Everywhere I turn I’m reading articles and tweets that talk about the shift of healthcare towards the patient. All the EHR vendors are touting various patient focused features. Supposedly, a new engaged patient is getting involved in their healthcare and doctors are having to focus much more on the patient that they’ve ever done before. The drum beat of patient focus is being beat in so many places.

Is this really happening or is this just the topic du jour?

Some might argue that things like meaningful use’s patient engagement requirements are pushing this movement forward. However, those who have worked to meet those requirements know very well that meeting the meaningful use patient engagement measures doesn’t look very much like true patient engagement. The concept was interesting, but the actual implementation leaves a lot to be desired.

I have recently seen some patients start to care a little bit more about their health than they did before. This is driven largely by the high deductible plans. It’s amazing how getting people to pay for their care will change their attitude. Although, even then it hasn’t made people want to care about their healthcare. It’s just made them more informed on the price of the healthcare they receive.

Has the healthcare system really turned towards the patient? Are we any more focused on the patient now than we’ve ever been before? I don’t think we are. For all the talk, I haven’t seen much action and I can’t think of something that’s really going to dramatically change things.

I’d love to hear if people disagree. Do you see a shift of focus towards the patient? Have we always been focused on the patient, and so it’s not really a shift at all? Are there things we should be doing to encourage a shift to the patient?

Karen DeSalvo and Jacob Reider Leave ONC

Posted on October 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s been a tumultuous few months for ONC and it’s just gotten even more tumultuous. We previously reported about the departures of Doug Fridsma MD, ONC’s Chief Science Officer, Joy Pritts, the first Chief Privacy Officer at ONC, and Lygeia Ricciardi, Director of the Office of Consumer eHealth, and Judy Murphy, Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) from ONC. Yesterday, the news dropped that Karen DeSalvo, ONC’s National Coordinator, and Jacob Reider, ONC’s Deputy National Coordinator, are both leaving ONC as well.

Karen DeSalvo has been tapped by HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell to replace Wanda K. Jones as assistant secretary of health which oversees the surgeon general’s office and will be working on Ebola and other pressing health issues. I think DeSalvo’s letter to staff describes it well:

As you know, I have deep roots and a belief in public health and its critical value in assuring the health of everyone, not only in crisis, but every day, and I am honored to be asked to step in to serve.

DeSalvo’s always been a major public health advocate and that’s where her passion lies. Her passion isn’t healthcare technology. So, this change isn’t surprising. Although, it is a little surprising that it comes only 10 months into her time at ONC.

The obvious choice as Acting National Coordinator would have been Jacob Reider who was previously Acting National Coordinator when Farzad Mostashari left. However, Reider also announced his decision to leave ONC:

In light of the events that led to Karen’s announcement today–it’s appropriate now to be clear about my plans, as well. With Jon White and Andy Gettinger on board, and a search for a new Deputy National Coordinator well underway, I am pleased that much of this has now fallen into place–with only a few loose ends yet to be completed. I’ll remain at ONC until late November, working closely with Lisa as she assumes her role as Acting National Coordinator.

As Reider mentions, Lisa Lewis who is currently ONC’s COO will be serving as Acting National Coordinator at ONC.

What’s All This Mean?
There’s a lot of speculation as to why all of these departures are happening at ONC. Many people believe that ONC is a sinking ship and people are doing everything they can to get off the ship before it sinks completely. Others have suggested that these people see an opportunity to make a lot more money working for a company. The government certainly doesn’t pay market wages for the skills these people have. Plus, their connections and experience at ONC give them some unique qualifications that many companies are willing to pay to get. Some have suggested that the meaningful use work is mostly done and so these people want to move on to something new.

My guess is that it’s a mix of all of these things. It’s always hard to make broad generalizations about topics like this. For example, I already alluded to the fact that I think Karen DeSalvo saw an opportunity to move to a position that was more in line with her passions. Hard to fault someone for making that move. We’d all do the same.

What is really unclear is the future of ONC. They still have a few years of meaningful use which they’ll have to administer including the EHR penalties which could carry meaningful use forward for even longer than just a few years. I expect ONC will still have money to work on things like interoperability. We’ll see if ONC can put together the patient safety initiative they started or if that will get shut down because it’s outside their jurisdiction.

Beyond those things, what’s the future of ONC?

Medical Device Security – Where Is the Finger Pointing?

Posted on October 23, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If a picture is worth a thousands words, the above picture is worth about 10,000. I think this picture is best summed up by saying that the medical device industry is a heavily regulated industry. You can see why EHR vendors don’t want to be regulated by the FDA. It would get pretty crazy.

This image also illustrates to me why a company that’s built an FDA or medical device compliance capability has something of real value. Navigating the process is not easy and it helps if you’ve been there and done it before.

As to Dr. Wen’s comment on the tweet. There are a lot of challenges when it comes to medical device security. Definitely no antivirus and many are running on old operating systems that can’t be updated. We’re going to have to put some serious thought into how to solve problems like these in future medical devices.

Interesting and Funny Insights Into EHR and Health Information Management

Posted on October 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last week I had the chance to attend the Craneware Summit in Las Vegas. It was a really interesting event where I had the chance to meet and talk with a wide variety of people from across the spectrum of healthcare. I love getting these added perspectives.

One of the sessions I attended was an E&M session which provided some really interesting insights into the life of an E&M coder and how they look at things. There’s a lot more to their job, but I tweeted these comments because they made me laugh and illustrated part of the challenge they face in a new EMR world.


I thought these immediate responses to the question were interesting. They came from a crowd of HIM and coding professionals. Overall, they were quite supportive of EMR it seemed.


Many doctors don’t understand this. That’s why so many coders still have jobs.


Too funny.


Said like a true coder.

Are You a Healthcare Data Hoarder?

Posted on October 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m thinking I need to start a new healthcare reality TV show called “Healthcare Data Hoarders.” We’ll go into healthcare institutions (after signing our HIPAA lives away), and take a look through all the data a healthcare organization is storing away.

My guess is that we wouldn’t have to look very far to find some really amazing healthcare data hoarders. The healthcare data hoarding I see happening in comes in two folds: legacy systems and data warehouses.

Legacy Systems – You know the systems I’m talking about. They’re the ones stored under a desk in the back of radiology. The software is no longer being updated. In fact, the software vendor is often not even around anymore. However, for some reason you think you’re going to need the data off that system that’s 30 years old and only one person in your entire organization knows how to access the legacy software. Yes, I realize there are laws that require healthcare organizations to “hoard” data to some extent. However, many of these legacy systems are well past those legal data retention requirements.

Data Warehouses – These come in all shapes and sizes and for this hoarding article let me suggest that an EHR is kind of a data warehouse (yes, I’m using a really broad definition). Much like a physical hoarder, I see a lot of organizations in healthcare that are gathering virtual piles of data for which they have no use and will likely never find a way to use it. Historically, a data warehouse manager’s job is to try and collect, normalize, and aggregate all of the healthcare organizations data into one repository. Yes, the data warehouse manager is really the Chief Healthcare Data Hoarder. Gather and protect and and all data you can find.

While I love the idea that we’re collecting data that can hopefully make healthcare better, just collecting data doesn’t do anything to improve healthcare. In fact, it can often retard efforts to leverage healthcare data to improve health. The problem is that the healthcare data that can be leveraged for good is buried under all of this useless data. It takes so much effort to sift through the junk data that people just stop before they even get started.

Are you collecting data and not doing anything with it? I challenge you to remedy that situation.

Is your healthcare organization a healthcare data hoarder?

8 Steps to Creating a Solid EHR Foundation – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on October 15, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Noelle Whang, Sr. Instructional Designer at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Noelle Whang
Implementing an electronic health record (EHR) is a huge undertaking, but the work after go live can be even more demanding. Mapping and redesigning workflows is an important aspect of EHR implementation and optimization that is often overlooked, especially after the application has been live for a while.  This seemingly simple but complex task involves diagraming and analyzing all current work processes and adjusting them to include use of a new EHR system or upgrade, or to be more effective with a current system.

Workflow mapping and redesign should occur before implementation and regularly after go live to ensure end users truly adopt the EHR and organizational benefits are realized. Following these eight steps can ease the task of mapping workflows to identify any that should be adjusted to maximize optimization:

  1. Identify what workflows will need to be mapped in detail. “Understanding the full clinical context for health IT to the level of task, resources, and workflow is a necessary prerequisite for successful adoption of health IT,” according to a Perspectives in Health Information Management article. It’s helpful to first map out the entire patient care process at a high level, such as from registration to discharge in the inpatient setting and scheduling to check-out in the ambulatory setting. Documenting how business is performed at a high-level facilitates identifying the more granular tasks that need to be mapped in detail, such as scheduling a patient appointment or placing verbal orders.  It also helps in identifying all the roles involved in each workflow, as these can vary depending on the department or patient process.  For example, discharging a patient from Labor and Delivery may include roles, such as a lactation nurse and pediatrician, not found in other departments.  Remember to also consider departments or patient processes that are often overlooked, such as Materials Management and Respiratory Therapy. Other areas of concentration should be those with lower productivity or that relate to how the organization is going to determine return on investment.
  1. Identify teams to map out each process. After identifying what workflows need to be mapped, establish the team that will do the actual mapping. Usually, individuals who perform a particular workflow or those who are responsible for implementing any redesign changes are best suited to map workflows, as they have in-depth knowledge of the process. For example, select one registrar, one nurse and one physician to map out all workflows in the Emergency Department.
  1. Determine the process for mapping the workflows. Once the team has been identified, determine how information about workflows will be gathered, documented, and visually represented. The process for gathering information can be through interviews, observation, or meetings.  The information can be documented with tools such as Microsoft Word or Visio or simply on paper.  The data can be represented in formats such as a swim lane chart, a flow process chart or other process diagrams.   In my experience mapping out workflows, the most commonly used format is a swim lane chart created through Visio.  And remember: Internal staff will most likely need to be trained on how to gather the data and use the appropriate tools.
  1. Map the workflow as actually performed. After determining how information is gathered and documented, create the actual workflows diagrams.  Document all work as it is currently being performed, including any undesirable behavior such as workarounds or inconsistencies.  For a case study on how one organization created their workflow diagrams, see the following Journal of American Medical Information Association article.
  1. Analyze the workflow. Once the workflows are diagramed, begin the analysis. If a vendor has not been selected, use the diagrams to determine if a particular application fits the needs of your organization, with the caveat that it is neither feasible nor desirable to keep workflows exactly the same after an implementation.  If the application is already in place, the diagrams can be used to determine where problems are occurring, what the root cause is, and how to fix them.  The diagrams can also be used to determine where optimization or efficiencies may be gained.
  1. Document the new workflow. Once the analysis is complete and you have determined what workflows are currently not working for your organization, document the new and improved workflow.  It is a good idea to take the new workflows through a couple of use-case scenarios to ensure that the updates are not causing other problems or unintended consequences.
  1. Update or create policies and procedures. New or updated policies and procedures may be necessary to implement and support the new workflow. This can include determining consequences for any end users that do not adhere to the new workflows.  Note that this also requires thinking about how non-adherence will be identified, perhaps through routine application audits or quarterly in-department observation.
  1. Train staff. After all the hard lifting of creating the workflow diagrams, analyzing the processes and updating the workflows, the last step is to train end users on the new workflows, policies and procedures.  Remember to convey why the changes are occurring, and if possible, tie the reasons to big-ticket items such as increasing patient safety and satisfaction.

It’s easy to focus entirely on big tasks such as vendor selection and system configuration when implementing an EHR, but neglecting workflows can have serious negative impacts, including costly reconfigurations and operational inefficiencies.  It’s like building a house where each individual room is perfect, but the doors are all in the wrong place. With poor design you end up having to go through the closet to get to the kitchen, or even worse the foundation may begin to crack.  Similarly, with poorly designed EHR workflows, you can end up with duplicate documentation, activities that take more time than they should, and workarounds or shortcuts that can lead to negative consequences. Set your healthcare organization up for success and create a solid foundation by making workflow mapping and redesign a priority.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts. The Breakaway Group is a leader in EHR and Health IT training.

Google Helpouts Tested in Google Search Results – Dr. Google?

Posted on October 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It was first noticed by someone on Reddit and then confirmed by Engadget that Google has been testing a Google Helpout style feature which offers a telemedicine video visit with a doctor. You can see an image of the test Google search telemedicine integration below:
Google Helpout - Google Search Integration

This is a really interesting integration for a number of reasons. First, Google wasn’t charging for these initial test visits, but would no doubt charge for these visits in the future. Second, it takes an Act of God to get Google to integrate something into their cash cow: search results. That should tell us how serious Google is about doing these types of integrations.

I can already hear the naysayers who think this is a terrible idea. They might be right as a business. We’ll have to see how that plays out. The reimbursement model could a challenging one. Plus, there are plenty of reasons why this won’t work. Google will have to get really good at knowing when to offer a visit and when not to offer a visit. We’ll see if they want to make the investment required to understand when the visit is something that should be encouraged and when it shouldn’t be encouraged.

One thing I’ve observed with Telemedicine is that it can really work well…if you have the right situation. The reason Telemedicine has gotten a bad rap is that the naysayers have plenty of ammo they can use to explain why Telemedicine could be a terrible thing. These naysayers are correct. There are a bunch of healthcare situations where a telemedicine visit just isn’t going to work. However, just because something doesn’t solve 100% of the situations doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be used for the 30% of the time (I think it could be more than this) that it’s a beautifully elegant solution that’s just as effective as an in office visit?

As noted, this was just at trial by Google. Google is well known for trying things to see how they do and then scraping them after the trial. So, we’ll see how this goes. It does seem that Google can’t keep its hands out of healthcare. I think they see the trillion dollar industry and just can’t resist.

Patient Shark Tank at Digital Health Conference

Posted on October 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’ve been working with NYeC to promote the Digital Health Conference since the very first Digital Health Conference 4 years ago. It’s a great event and I get a chance to meet many of you readers there. Plus, I just love spending time in NYC. If you’ve never been, you can register here (20% off your registration when you use the discount code: HCS).

I just heard about a new feature at the conference this year: The Patient Shark Tank. Here’s a description of what they have in store:

How do we ensure that the patient voice is amplified in the design, the development, or enhancement of innovations created FOR the patient? Patient communities are emerging as key influencers and disrupting the healthcare landscape. They are impacting strategies, policies, and setting the stage for new patient-centric innovations. Patients are now sought after thought leaders influencing the way healthcare systems think about and interact with patients and prodding them to improve the patient experience.

Join us as our judges rate innovations from the patient and caregiver perspective and innovators build their perspective into the innovations designed to serve them. As each innovator pitches their concept or initiative, our patient and caregiver panelists will ask targeted questions based on their experiences to understand how the innovation uniquely addresses patient needs. In addition, we will integrate clinician perspective to understand whether a doctor would prescribe the innovation to their patients.

I’m a huge fan of Shark Tank, so I love the idea. I only hope that they’ve got a line up of judges that are as entertaining as Shark Tank. Sometimes these events can get pretty bland if they choose judges who are shy about sharing their opinions on a company or product. That doesn’t benefit the companies or the audience.

Unfortunately, you won’t have much time to get your idea submitted. The deadline to apply to pitch your innovative concept or initiative is Thursday, October 16th. I look forward to seeing what ideas get pitched at the event.

Building Accountability and Consistency Into Your Healthcare Practice

Posted on October 9, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Vishal Gandhi, CEO of ClinicSpectrum as part of the Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with him on Twitter @ClinicSpectrum and @csvishal2222.
Vishal Gandhi
One of the biggest challenges a leader in any organization faces is building accountability into their workflow. While we’d all like to think that we’re hiring great people that will always work at a high level, we all know that even the best people’s work improves when you build in some accountability for the work they do.

What I’ve found in the hundreds of practices I’ve seen is that the majority of people in a medical practice are working hard. Sure, there are the outliers that are just coasting through the day, watching the clock for when they can punch out, but we all can recognize and deal with those people pretty well. The harder challenge is those staff who are working really hard, but are busy working on the wrong things.

How do you make sure that someone in your practice is working on the right things? The simple answer is to track and report on the work that matters most in your office. In some cases, this report can be something as simple as a text message or email. In other cases, you might automate the reporting so that the accountability is built directly into the practice’s regular workflow.

Reporting and accountability is an extremely powerful concept for a practice. Not only does it ensure that the practice is working on the right things, but it improves productivity as well. Reports that are collected and checked regularly encourage your employees to work harder and be more productive. It’s just human nature for people to want to look good on a report. This is a powerful part of accountability and reporting.

However, let me offer a few words of caution when it comes to measuring, tracking, and reporting on productivity in your office. First, make sure that you’re clear with your staff on why these reports are important to the office. Second, be sure they understand that you’ll be working together with them to make sure that you’re tracking and reporting is accurate and focused on the right things. Accountability and reporting is a double edged sword. If you’re tracking the right things, it can lead to tremendous results. If you’re tracking the wrong things, it can lead to negative results. Don’t be afraid to make adjustments to what you’re doing. Also, be generous with your staff and understanding when something doesn’t look or feel right. Dig into the data with them to find the real story before jumping to conclusions. Then, make corrections if necessary.

Be sure to leverage technology where it makes sense to automatically track and report the data that matters. Your goal should be to work with your staff to create a consistent and expected workflow that efficiently measures and reports on the key metrics for your organization. Not only will this consistency make your staff more efficient, but it will make it much easier when staff don’t show up to work due to some family emergency or the inevitable staff turnover.

When you create a practice that is process dependent instead of people dependent, it opens up all sorts of options and flexibility for your practice. This shift in mentality provides a buffer where a strategic sourcing partner can cover any “down time” your office may experience during staff emergencies or staff turnover. Plus, your ongoing tracking and reporting is the perfect way to hold this sourcing partner accountable for the work they do for your practice.

These measurements and reports also serve as a baseline benchmark for your practice going forward. As your staff turns over, you can easily assess the health of your practice and the quality of your future hires using these benchmarks. Plus, as you improve your clinic’s efficiency, you and your staff will be able to celebrate the success of beating previous benchmarks. In future posts, we’ll look at what benchmarks matter most and comparing your practice’s benchmarks against national benchmark data.

The Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts is sponsored by ClinicSpectrum, a leading provider of workflow automation solutions for healthcare. Their Productivity Spectrum product provides a simple monitoring tool that provides time clock functionality, benchmarking and compliance, performance analysis, and productivity management for clinical practices. Stop by the ClinicSpectrum booth at MGMA (Booth 330) for more info.