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Health IT Usability Comic and a Little Rant – Fun Friday

Posted on May 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This comic reminds me of healthcare IT and EHR government regulations lately. See if you can relate to this great Dilbert comic.

For healthcare I might change the wording to say…

“Your certification and regulation requirements include four hundred features.”

“Do you realize that no doctor is able to use a product with that level of complexity?”

“Good point. How can I certify “Easy to use?””

I’m reminded of the keynote I saw the US CIO give. He said that one of the biggest challenges is taking regulation off the books. I’d love to see HHS and ONC see how many regulations they could remove as opposed to continuing to create new regulations.

If they’re not sure where to start, let me give them an idea. If you’ve required the collection of data which you haven’t ever used, that regulation is gone. That should do away with 3/4 of the healthcare regulations.

P.S. Sorry to take a Fun Friday and make it not so fun. I couldn’t help myself.

Both US And International Doctors Unimpressed With Govt Telehealth Adoption

Posted on May 25, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new survey by physician social network SERMO has concluded that both US and foreign physicians aren’t impressed with national and local telehealth efforts by governments.

The US portion of the survey, which had 1,651 physician respondents, found that few US doctors were pleased with the telehealth adoption efforts in their state. Forty-one percent said they felt their state had done a “fair” job in adopting telehealth, which 44 percent said the state’s programs were either “poor” or “very poor.” Just 15 percent of US physicians rated their state’s telehealth leaders as doing either “well” or “very well” with such efforts.

Among the various states, Ohio’s programs got the best ratings, with 22 percent of doctors saying the state’s telehealth programs were doing “well” or “very well.” California came in in second place, with 20 percent of physician-respondents describing their state’s efforts as doing “well” or “very well.”

On the flip side, 59 percent of New Jersey doctors said the state’s telehealth efforts were “poor” or “very poor.” New York also got low ratings, with 51 percent of doctors deeming the state’s programs were “poor” or “very poor.”

Interestingly, physicians based outside the US had comparable – though slightly more positive — impressions of their countries’ telehealth efforts. Thirty-eight percent of the 1,831 non-US doctors responding to the survey rated their country as having done a “fair” job with telehealth adoption, a stronger middle ground than in the US. That being said, 43 percent said their country has done a “poor” or “very poor” job with adopting telehealth programs, while just 19 percent rated their countries’ efforts as going “well” or “very well.”

As with state-by-state impressions in the US, physicians’ impressions of how well their country was doing with telehealth adoption varied significantly.  Spain got the best rating, with 26 percent of physicians saying efforts there were going “well” or “very well.” Meanwhile, the United Kingdom got the worst ratings, with 62 percent of doctors describing telehealth efforts there as “poor” or “very poor.”

Of course, all of this begs the question of what doctors were taking into account when they rated their country or state’s telehealth-related initiatives.

What makes doctors feel one telehealth adoption program is effective and another not effective? What kind of support are physicians looking for from their state or country? Are there barriers to implementation that a government entity is better equipped to address than private industry? Do they want officials to support the advancement of telehealth technology?  I’d prefer to know the answers to these questions before leaping to any conclusions about the significance of SERMO’s data.

That being said, it does seem that doctors see some role for government in promoting the growth of telehealth use, if for no other reason than that that they’re paying enough attention to know whether such efforts are working or not. That surprises me a bit, given that the biggest obstacles to physician telehealth adoption are generally getting paid for such services and handling the technology aspects of telemedicine delivery.

But if the study is any indication, doctors want more support from public entities. I’ll be interested to see whether Ohio and California keep leading the pack in this country — and what they’re doing right.

Seven Factors That Will Make 2018 A Challenging Year For EMR Vendors

Posted on May 24, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Unless they’re monumentally important, I generally don’t regurgitate the theories researchers develop about health IT. But this time I’m changing strategies. While their analysis may not fit in the “earth shattering” category, I thought their list of factors that will shape 2018’s EMR market was dead on, so here it is.

According to a report created by analyst firm Kalorama Research, a number of trends are brewing which could make next year a particularly, well, interesting one for EMR vendors. (By the by, the allegedly Chinese curse, “May you live in interesting times” probably wasn’t Chinese in origin — it seems to have been minted in the 19th century by a British politician named Joseph Chamberlain. But I digress.)

According to Kalorama publisher Bruce Carlton, many forces are converging, including:

  • Frustrated physicians: Physician rage over clunky EMRs may boil over next year. No one vendor seems positioned to scoop up their business, but of course many will try.
  • Hospital EMR switches: While hospitals have been switching out EMRs for quite some time, defections may climb to new levels. Their main objective: Improve workflows.
  • Emerging technologies: Trendy approaches like dashboarding, blockchain and advanced big data analytics will begin to be integrated with existing EMR technologies. Or as the report notes, “the Old EMR doesn’t cut it anymore.”
  • IT staff shortages: It takes a pretty seasoned IT pro to run an EMR, but they’re hard to find, especially if you want them to have a lot of relevant experience. But without their expertise, provider organizations may not get the most out of their systems. This may spell opportunity for vendors offering better service, the report says.
  • Breach of the day: With each cybersecurity breach, EMRs get negative coverage, and the effects of this bad PR are accreting. Tales of ransomware, a particularly lurid form of cybercrime, are only making things worse.
  • Many EMR vendors remain: Despite a barrage of M&A activity in the sector, there are still over 1,000 vendors in the EMR space, Kalorama notes. In other words, competition for EMR customers will still be brisk, particularly given that no one vendor – even giants like Cerner and Epic – owns more than one-fifth of the market (This assertion comes from firm’s own market estimates.)
  • New Administration, new goals: To date the White House hasn’t proposed specific changes to health IT policy, but one clue comes from the appointment of an HHS Secretary who dislikes the meaningful use program. Anything could happen here.

In addition to the factors cited by Kalorama, I’d suggest one other trend to consider. As I’ve noted above, Kalorama argues that customers will demand EMRs that incorporate sexy new technologies, perhaps more so than in the past. I’d go further with this projection. From what I’m hearing, a consensus is emerging that EMR architectures must be completely deconstructed and rethought for today’s data.

With important data flows emerging from wearables, apps, remote monitoring devices and the like, it may not makes sense to put a big database at the center of the EMR platform anymore. After all, what’s the point of setting up an enterprise EMR as the ultimate source of truth if so much important data is being generated by mobile devices at the network edge?

Anyway, that’s my two cents, along with Kalorama’s predictions. What do you think 2018 will look like for EMR vendors, and why?

How Will APIs Change Health IT? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on May 23, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 5/26 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Chad Johnson (@OchoTex) on the topic of “How Will APIs Change Health IT?.”

First, let’s define API: An application programming interface (API) is a set of standards that enable communication between multiple sources, most typically software applications. More specifically, an API is a set of routines, protocols, and data standards defined by a software vendor (an EHR for example) that specify how other vendor applications can contribute to or remove data from their database.

Other industries have profited from modern API integration, driven by the boost of internet technologies such as cloud applications and smart phones. Almost every consumer-facing technology runs on modern APIs – facebook, Twitter, Waze, Mint, etc. Facebook’s internal API, for example, pulls in data from all your friends’ FB feeds and displays it onto your feed. FB’s external API allows you to post items to your facebook feed using other applications, such as Instagram or Twitter.

Can you think of a popular/widespread/well known example of APIs in healthcare? No? Not surprisingly, healthcare has some catching up to do with APIs.

The good news for healthcare is that providers and vendors are realizing the potential impact modern APIs have on workflows, patient care, and… profits. The HL7 FHIR healthcare standard, along with Meaningful Use Stage 3 API requirements, have solidified the hype and marked API and cloud integration almost essential to understand.

Let’s discuss that in this week’s #HITsm chat.

T1: What barriers do you see for API adoption in hospitals? #HITsm

T2: Will EHRs eventually allow two-way API connectivity (read & write)? #HITsm

T3: Can API connectivity change perceptions about ‘siloed’ EHR patient databases? #HITsm

T4: Will APIs motivate hospitals to store their patient data in the cloud? #HITsm

T5: Will APIs open up the door to other vendors and applications? Or just broaden current EHR footprint? #HITsm

Bonus: What innovative solutions do you predict creative IT teams can employ for patients and caregivers? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
6/2 – Patient Stories, Not Just for Story Time Anymore
Hosted by the #WTFix Community

6/9 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

6/16 – TBD
Hosted by Danielle Siarri (@innonurse)

6/16 – TBD
Hosted by Megan Janas (@TextraHealth)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Big Data and the Social Good: The Value for Healthcare Organizations

Posted on May 22, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Mike Serrano from NETSCOUT.

It’s a well-known fact that Facebook, Google, and our phone companies collect a lot of information about each of us. This has been the case for a long time, and more often than not it’s to improve the user experience of the services we rely on. If data is shared outside the organization, it’s anonymized to prevent the usage of any one individual from being identified. But it’s understandable while this practice has still sparked a passionate and longstanding debate about privacy and ‘big brother’-style snooping.

What is often forgotten, however, or more likely drowned out by the inevitably growing chorus of privacy concerns, is the opportunity within the big data community for this valuable information to be used for social good. The potential is already there. The question, though, is how different organizations, and particularly the healthcare sector, can take advantage of anonymized user data to benefit society and improve the human condition.

When it comes to healthcare, data from mobile networks holds the biggest opportunity for the patient experience to be dramatically improved. To truly understand how real-time traffic and big data, in the form of historical network usage and traffic patterns, can be used for social good, let’s look at a few possible scenarios – two of which can be accomplished without needing to disclose individual user information at all.

Public health – Getting ahead of an outbreak

What a decade ago would have seemed impossible is very much a reality today. The pervasiveness of the smartphone and how people are using it has fundamentally changed our ability to leverage real-time communications data to the benefit of our society. For many people, smartphones have replaced computers as the primary device to search for information. This has value in itself, as when people use a smartphone it’s possible to place them in context of their community and travel patterns.

Zika is a recent example of a parasite spread by mosquitos that produces flu-like symptoms and can have grave consequences on a developing fetus, causing microcephaly. To control the mosquito population, local vector control agencies place field traps to capture mosquitos and periodically test the mosquitos they collect. This approach has value, but it’s slow and reactive.

What we have learned from flu epidemics is there’s typically an increase in Google searches of “flu symptoms” that emerge just before or at the same time as an outbreak of influenza. Since Zika is a mosquito-born pathogen, it will occur outside of times of the normal spread of influenza, but the initial symptoms are very similar to the common flu.

By monitoring mobile searches for any of a number of unique search terms, it is possible to quickly identify real-time locations where outbreaks may be occurring; thus allowing for a more targeted response by both vector control and public health agencies. In addition, it’s then possible to identify the extent to which migration through the area has occurred, and to where that population has traveled.

When merged with environmental data such as wind patterns, temperature, and precipitation, public health agencies can be extremely targeted about where to deploy resources and the nature of those resources to deploy. Such a targeted and immediate response is only available through the use of real-time network traffic data.

Public safety and medical deployments – disaster response

Recent earthquakes have emphasized the potential death and destruction that natural disasters can create. When buildings collapse first responders’ rush in to look for survivors, putting themselves in harms way as a series of aftershocks could cause additional damage to already weakened structures. But it’s a calculated risk. The search for life must happen quickly, which often means first responders are operating with no knowledge of the potential number of causalities within a building.

To ensure the appropriate allocation of response teams, public safety agencies working in tandem with healthcare organizations could leverage mobile network data. When a mobile phone is turned on, it automatically registers to the mobile network. At this point, the operator knows the number of devices in a certain area based on the placement of the cell tower and the parameters of that tower.

By comparing the last known number of registrants against historical network usage, the operator could guide public safety and relief agencies by understanding the number of known mobile phones in an impacted area. If needed, the operator could also assist in the identification of precisely who may still be in a damaged structure, should that level of detail be required.

Pandemic control – removing the guesswork

All major health organizations understand the next major pandemic is only a plane ride away from arriving on their doorstep. For example, when an international flight lands from a country that’s had a recent outbreak of flu or disease, there could potentially be hundreds of infected passengers on board. Those passengers will exit the plane, grab their luggage, and quickly head into the community – travelling far from the airport and growing the transmission radius significantly.

In a situation such as this, the challenge of containing or managing an outbreak is intrinsically tied to knowing where those passengers end up. How far have they travelled, how did they diffuse into the existing population, and how many circles of control need to be established in order to mitigate the risk?

Big data can address this issue. By working with mobile network operators the local healthcare community can quickly react, taking advantage of big data to deploy public health resources more effectively than they could otherwise. Operators already have access to this information, including where subscribers join the network and their current location, and this data is tremendously valuable when placed in the hands of healthcare professionals looking to stem a viral outbreak. The airline involved could also assist by providing any the phone numbers of passengers once the risk was identified.

The future of big data analysis for healthcare

Understanding human movement and social activity, powered by big data pulled from mobile networks, will have a fundamental role to play in more efficient healthcare response in the future. National, state, and local public health officials should all look to implement initiatives based on the use of big data for social good.

When you compare the use of big data against the current approach – where patient zero arrives at hospital and the local healthcare body has to try and identify who else is at risk based on the patient’s travel patterns and limited information they can provide – the benefits of this new approach are obvious.

As the conversation around the use of big data for healthcare purposes evolves, there will inevitably be new questions over individual privacy. While the examples outlined above do take advantage of subscriber behavior and individual insights – be that search terms of location information – the purpose is to understand populations or communities, not to identify any one subscriber. With this in mind, it is easy to mask subscriber identifiers while preserving the information about the population. Ultimately, the goal is to provide a more efficient utilization and allocation of society’s resources as we work to improve the human condition, not to undermine any one person’s right to privacy.

About Mike Serrano
Mike has over 20 years of experience in the communications industry. He is currently responsible for Service Provider Marketing at NETSCOUT. He began his career at PacBell (now part of at&t) where he designed service plans for the business market and where he was responsible for demand analysis and modeling. His career continued with Lucent technologies where he brought to market the first mobile data service technology. At Alloptic, he was responsible for marketing the industry’s first EPON access solution and bringing to market the first RFOG solution. At O3B Networks, Mike headed up marketing bringing to market the first MEO based constellation of satellites for serving internet service to the Other 3 Billion on the planet. Mike’s work continued at Cisco where he helped to define MediaNet (Videoscape) and the network technology transformation for cable operators. Mike holds a B.S. in Information Resource Management from San Jose State University and an MBA from Santa Clara University

E-Patient Update:  Changing The Patient Data Sharing Culture

Posted on May 19, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I’ve been fighting for what I believe in for most of my life, and that includes getting access to my digital health information. I’ve pleaded with medical practice front-desk staff, gently threatened hospital HIT departments and gotten in the faces of doctors, none of whom ever seem to get why I need all of my data.

I guess you could say that I’m no shrinking violet, and that I don’t give up easily. But lately I’ve gotten a bit, let me say, discouraged when it comes to bringing together all of the data I generate. It doesn’t help that I have a few chronic illnesses, but it’s not easy even for patients with no major issues.

Some these health professionals know something about how EMRs work, how accurate, complete health records facilitate care and how big data analysis can improve population health. But when it comes to helping humble patients participate in this process, they seem to draw a blank.

The bias against sharing patient records with the patients seems to run deep. I once called the PR rep at a hospital EMR vendor and complained casually about my situation, in which a hospital told me that it would take three months to send me records printed from their EMR. (If I’d asked them to send me a CCD directly, the lady’s head might have exploded right there on the phone.)

Though I didn’t ask, the vendor rep got on the phone, reached a VP at the hospital and boom, I had my records. It took a week and a half, a vendor and hospital VP just to get one set of records to one patient. And for most of us it isn’t even that easy.

The methods providers have used to discourage my data requests have been varied. They include that I have to pay $X per page, when state law clearly states that (much lower) $Y is all they can charge. I’ve been told I just have to wait as long as it takes for the HIM department to get around to my request, no matter how time-sensitive the issue. I was even told once that Dr. X simply didn’t share patient records, and that’s that. (I didn’t bother to offer her a primer on state and federal medical records laws.) It gets to be kind of amusing over time, though irritating nonetheless.

Some of these skirmishes can be explained by training gaps or ignorance, certainly. What’s more, even if a provider encourages patient record requests there are still security and privacy issues to navigate. But I believe that what truly underlies provider resistance to giving patients their records is a mix of laziness and fear. In the past, few patients pushed the records issue, so hospitals and medical groups got lazy. Now, patients are getting assertive, and they fear what will happen.

Of course, we all have a right to our medical records, and if patients persist they will almost always get them. But if my experience is any guide, getting those records will remain difficult if attitudes don’t change. The default cultural setting among providers seems to be discomfort and even rebellion when they’re asked to give consumers their healthcare data. My protests won’t change a thing if people are tuning me out.

There’s many reasons for their reaction, including the rise of challenging, self-propelled patients who don’t assume the doctor knows best in all cases. Also, as in any other modern industry, data is power, and physicians in particular are already feeling almost powerless.

That being said, the healthcare industry isn’t going to meet its broad outcomes and efficiency goals unless patients are confident and comfortable with managing their health. Collecting, amassing and reviewing our health information greatly helps patients like me to stay on top of issues, so encumbering our efforts is counter-productive.

To counter such resistance, we need to transform the patient data sharing culture from resistant to supportive. Many health leaders seem to pine for the days when patients could have the data when and if they felt like it, but those days are past. Participating happily in a patient’s data collection efforts needs to become the norm.

If providers hope to meet the transformational goals they’ve set for themselves, they’ll have to help patients get their data as quickly, cheaply and easily as possible. Failing to do this will block or at least slow the progress of much-needed industry reforms, and they’re already a big stretch. Just give patients their data without a fuss – it’s the right thing to do!

The EHR Market – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on May 17, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Note: We’re sorry to share that Anne Zieger (@annezieger) who was suppose to host this week’s chat had some health issues and so we had to change the topic and host. Anne is doing ok and we’ll be sure to have her back as host of a future chat.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 5/19 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by John Lynn (@hospitalEHR) on the topic of “The EHR Market.”

The EHR market has gotten very mature. Thanks to $36 billion in stimulus money fromt he government, most organizations have adopted an EHR. Depending on who you check for EHR market penetration numbers, in the hospital world EHR adoption looks to be well over 90%. The ambulatory world is further behind, but it’s well over 50% adoption now.

Given the maturity of the EHR market, I thought it would be fun to hold an #HITsm chat to discuss the future of the EHR market. Let’s talk about where it’s at today, where it’s going in the future, and what else we can expect from EHR vendors that will now be working in a largely saturated market. What does this mean for the industry and for you as a customer of these EHR vendors?

Join us on Friday May 19th at 12:00pm ET as we discuss the following questions on #HITsm:

The Questions
T1: How would you describe the state of the EHR market today? (specify ambulatory and/or hospital) #HITsm

T2: In what ways will the EHR market evolve over the next 5, 10, 20 years? #HITsm

T3: How much EHR switching do you expect to see in the future? What will be the impact to vendors and customers? #HITsm

T4: Where will we see EHR vendors expand as the market for EHR sales dries up? #HITsm

T5: What must have products will form alongside the EHR or even replace the EHR? #HITsm

Bonus: Which EHR vendors will be gone (or basically gone) in 10 years? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
5/26 – How APIs Will Change Health IT
Hosted by Chad Johnson (@OchoTex)

6/2 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

6/9 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

6/16 – TBD
Hosted by Danielle Siarri (@innonurse)

6/16 – TBD
Hosted by Megan Janas (@TextraHealth)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Direct, Sequoia Interoperability Projects Continue To Grow

Posted on May 15, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

While its fate may still be uncertain – as with any interoperability approach in this day and age – the Direct exchange network seems to be growing at least. At the same time, it looks like the Sequoia Project’s interoperability efforts, including the Carequality Interoperability Framework and its eHealthExchange Network, are also expanding rapidly.

According to a new announcement from DirectTrust, the number of health information service providers who engaged in Direct exchanges increased 63 percent during the first quarter of 2017, to almost 95,000, over the same period in 2016.  And, to put this growth in perspective, there were just 5,627 providers involved in Q1 of 2014.

Meanwhile, the number of trusted Direct addresses which could share PHI grew 21 percent, to 1.4 million, as compared with the same quarter of 2016. Again, for perspective, consider that there were only 182,279 such addresses available three years ago.

In addition, the Trust noted, there were 35.6 million Direct exchange transactions during the quarter, up 76 percent over the same period last year. It expects to see transaction levels hit 140 million by the end of this year.

Also, six organizations joined DirectTrust during the first quarter of 2017, including Sutter Health, the Health Record Banking Alliance, Timmaron Group, Moxe Health, Uticorp and Anne Arundel Medical Center. This brings the total number of members to 124.

Of course, DirectTrust isn’t the only interoperability group throwing numbers around. In fact, Seqouia recently issued a statement touting its growth numbers as well (on the same day as the Direct announcement, natch).

On that day, the Project announced that the Carequality Interoperability Framework had been implemented by more than 19,000 clinics, 800 hospitals and 250,000 providers.

It also noted that its eHealth Exchange Network, a healthcare data sharing network, had grown 35 percent over the past year, connecting participants in 65 percent of all US hospitals, 46 regional and state HIEs, 50,000 medical groups, more than 3,400 dialysis centers and 8,300 pharmacies. This links together more than 109, million patients, Sequoia reported.

So what does all of this mean? At the moment, it’s still hard to tell:

  • While Direct and Sequoia are expanding pretty quickly, there’s few phenomena to which we can compare their growth.
  • Carequality and CommonWell agreed late last year to share data across each others’ networks, so comparing their transaction levels to other entities would probably be deceiving.
  • Though the groups’ lists of participating providers may be accurate, many of those providers could be participating in other efforts and therefore be counted multiple times.
  • We still aren’t sure what metrics really matter when it comes to measuring interoperability success. Is it the number of transactions initiated by a provider? The number of data flows received? The number of docs and facilities who do both and/or incorporate the data into their EMR?

As I see it, the real work going forward will be for industry leaders to decide what kind of performance stats actually equate to interoperability success. Otherwise, we may not just be missing health sharing bullseyes, we may be firing at different targets.

ZDoggMD Talks Suicide

Posted on May 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was looking to do a Fun Friday post this week and so I went over to see if ZDoggMD had a new parody video I could share with the community. Instead of finding a Fun Friday video, I came across this episode of ZDogg’s Incident Report show and podcast that talks about suicide, mental health, and the new Netflix show called 13 Reasons Why.

No doubt this is just the start of the conversation, but I was really glad to see someone with a platform like ZDoggMD talking about mental health and suicide. Check out the conversation below:

I hope that ZDogg covers this topic more in the future and brings on some experts in the area. It’s a hard topic for him since his shows are usually so full of humor and sarcasm, but it’s ok for him to turn that off for a few shows here and there.

On the video, ZDogg talks about one of my friends that committed suicide in downtown vegas. It was a hard experience for many of us who knew him and had had no idea that he was suffering in silence. I know that many readers of this site have their own stories. Of course, I don’t think I need to mention how many doctors are suffering in silence as well. It’s a tragic thing and hopefully shows like the one above will help us talk about it more and find better solutions and support.

MUMPS and Healthcare

Posted on May 11, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Leave it to David Chou to point out how odd it is to work in healthcare IT. What’s shocking about the image David Chou shared above is that there are so many languages listed. However, despite the vast number of languages listed, MUMPS is so far off the radar of most tech people that they literally didn’t care about it enough to add it to the chart. That’s pretty sad for those of us who care about healthcare.

If you want to get another view about the challenge of so much of healthcare being run on MUMPS, check out this MUMPS thread on Hacker News. For those not familiar with Hacker News, it’s a site that was started by YCombinator and has grown into a community of some of the most progressive tech startup people in the world. The Hacker News thread is really long, so for those who don’t want to read it all the message is simple: MUMPS? What’s that? That’s awful!

To be fair, there were a few dissenting voices who commented on the great features of MUMPS. However, I have to admit that these people sound a little bit like those who espouse the benefits of the fax machine. Sure, it has some extremely beneficial features, but it’s downsides far outweigh the benefits described.

The reality is that we’re not going to get away from MUMPS in healthcare. When you realize that Epic, MEDITECH, Vista (VA), and Intersystems all use some form of MUMPS (or M as they prefer to call it now), you can see why MUMPS will be part of healthcare for a long time to come.

What’s more disappointing to me after reading the Hacker News thread was how people described the culture of the EHR vendors that use MUMPS. They really described it as uninterested in even exploring other more modern options that could help them better able to innovate their products and serve their customers.

Plus, it also hurts to hear so many programmers in the thread talk about how they shunned healthcare because they saw working on something like MUMPS as a career killer. I’m sure this is a common refrain for most developers out there. It’s disheartening to think that many EHR vendors will never benefit from the best developers as long as we’re on MUMPS.

I’m sure MUMPS was great in its day. It seems to have been a wise choice by Epic to start using it when I was born back in 1979. However, can you imagine the technical debt that’s accumulated all these years? Is it any wonder that innovation in healthcare works so slow?