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A Little #AHIMACon14 Twitter Roundup

Posted on September 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m in San Diego today at the AHIMA Annual Convention. It’s a great event that brings together some really passionate and wonderful Health Information Management professionals. There’s been some interesting Twitter activity at the event. Here’s a roundup of some of the interesting tweets:

Some really great insights. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the tweets above.

The Future of Healthcare IT Publishing

Posted on September 26, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

During today’s #HITsm chat, Karen DeSalvo joined the chat and asked what healthcare IT will be like in 2024. Brian Eastwood, Senior Editor at CIO.com, tweeted the following:


The topic was of interest to me as a health IT blogger myself. However, this was my response:


This of course led to Brian and I contributing to a series of possible 2024 Health IT Headlines we have to look forward to:

I’m pretty sure this wasn’t what Karen DeSalvo had in mind when she asked the question, but I thought it was fun to think about these possible headlines. Plus, I think there’s a fair amount we can learn from thinking about the future in this type of headline fashion. What do you think the healthcare IT headlines will say in 2024?

Outsourcing Claim Creation Infographic

Posted on September 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

You know I’m a sucker for an infographic. You can see my Health IT Infographic collection on Pinterest. I found the following infographic interesting since I’d describe it more as a sales infographic. It makes the case for outsourcing claim creation. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the infographic or on outsourcing claim creation. What do you think?

Outsourcing Claim Creation Infographic

Full Disclosure: ClinicSpectrum is a sponsor of the “Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series” on this site, but this post is not a sponsored post.

Has the Google Glass Hype Passed?

Posted on September 23, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It seems to me that the hype over Google Glass is done. Enough people started using them and many couldn’t see the apparent value. In fact, some are wondering if Google will continue to invest in it. They’ve gone radio silent on Google Glass from what I’ve seen. We’ll see if they’re planning to abandon the project or if they’re just reloading.

While the future of Google Glass seems unsure to me, I think the idea of always on, connected computing is still alive and well. Whether it’s eyeware, a watch or dome other wearable doesn’t matter to me. Always on, connected computing is a powerful concept.

I’m also interested in the telemedicine and second screen approaches that have been started using Google Glass in Healthcare. Both of these concepts will be an important part of the fabric of health care going forward.

I still remember the wow factor that occurred when I first used Google Glass. It still amazes me today. I just wish it were a little more functional and didn’t hurt my eyes when I used it for long periods.

What do you think of Google Glass and the category of always on computing?  Do you see something I’m missing?

What’s the Black Market Value of a Health Record?

Posted on September 22, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Somewhere in the past, an article put the value of a health record at $50. I’m really not sure who or what wrote the original article or set the price at $50, but that value has been perpetuated in article after article on the internet. Yes, that’s one of the features of the internet. It perpetuates misinformation (kind of like an EMR).

When people make the claim that a compromised health record is worth $50, they usually then say that it’s more valuable than a credit card which is only worth $5 (probably something else that’s debatable). When I hear this, I’ve always wondered how they got the $50 price tag. The reality is that the value of a health record is only what someone is willing to pay. You can say something has a certain value, but without a market to validate that people will consistently pay that price, then does it really have that value?

I’ve always wanted to dig into the black market of health records to try and validate the $50 price tag that everyone likes to claim for health records. However, there are some obvious reasons why I don’t want to dig around in the black market of health records. So, I’ve avoided touching that story.

The good news is that HIStalk discovered a great story by Krebs on Security that puts a value on the health record. Here’s an excerpt from the story:

How much are your medical records worth in the cybercrime underground? This week, KrebsOnSecurity discovered medical records being sold in bulk for as little as $6.40 apiece. The digital documents, several of which were obtained by sources working with this publication, were apparently stolen from a Texas-based life insurance company that now says it is working with federal authorities on an investigation into a possible data breach.

When you read the rest of the article, it’s amazing the sophisticated methods they’re using to sale, pay for and distribute these records. Reminds me of how many incredible things society could create if these smart people turned their efforts to good instead of bad, but I digress.

I love the last line of the article, “Incidentally, even at $8 per record, that’s cheaper than the price most stolen credit cards fetch on the underground markets.”

Like most markets, prices fluctuate based on supply and demand. So, I’m sure we could find various prices for health records. However, I hope we can do away with the blanket statement that health records are worth $50 and worth more than credit cards. Articles like this illustrate why I’m not sure that’s the case.

RACs’ Limited Restart and Partial Payment Window Opens

Posted on September 15, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Dawn Crump, VP of Audit Management Solutions at HealthPort.
Dawn Crump - HealthPort
The RACs are back and they’re offering acute care and critical access hospitals a sweet deal—at least for now.

The Recovery Audit Contractor (RAC) program had been on hold due to the reassigning and re-contracting of regions. In addition, there was a lawsuit pending between Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and CGI over RAC reimbursement rates, models and approaches. The lawsuit was resolved in August. But CGI quickly appealed causing further delay in full resumption of the RAC program.

So while everyone awaits another court decision and green light from CMS, two important RAC announcements were made by CMS.

  • A “limited” restart of the RAC program began in August, 2014, including a restricted number of claim reviews and service targets.
  • Some claims currently pending appeals of inpatient-status claim denials by RACs may be eligible for a partial payment settlement.

Limited Restart Underway

Until the RAC program is 100 percent back in session, some reviews will be conducted. These will be mostly automated reviews, but there will be some records requests and a limited number of complex reviews in certain select areas. During the restart, RACs will not review claims to determine whether the care was delivered in the appropriate setting. CMS said it hopes that the new RAC contracts will be awarded later this year.

From the Aug. 5 edition of the American Hospital Association’s News Now: “CMS will allow current RACs to restart a limited number of claim reviews beginning this month. The agency said most reviews will be done on an automated basis. However, a limited number will be complex reviews on certain claims, including spinal fusions, outpatient therapy services, durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies, and Medicare-approved cosmetic procedures.

One example of the latter is blepharoplasty, also known as an eyelid lift. The number of claims for this procedure has tripled in recent years, so I expect the RACs will make this procedure a hot target. To be covered under Medicare, vision must be impaired. What’s needed? Physician documentation of the reasons for surgery (e.g., eyelid droop interfering with vision).

Here are three specific steps to take with regard to the limited RAC restart:

  • Stay abreast of all RAC news and announcements and remain diligent in communicating with your regional peers regarding new RAC region assignments, contacts and educational opportunities.
  • Conduct an internal probe to ensure you’re following all of Medicare’s National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCDs).
  • Educate coders, billers and physicians around documentation, coding and billing for specific targets as mentioned above.

But the limited restart wasn’t the only important news.

Partial Repayment Deal Announced

In their September 9th, 2014 inpatient hospital reviews announcement, CMS announced an administrative agreement for acute care and critical access hospitals.  To reduce the backlog of cases in appeal status and overall administrative costs, these hospitals now have the option to withdraw their pending appeals in “exchange for timely partial payment (68% of the allowable amount)”, according to the CMS administrative agreement.

Of course there are parameters to understand and details to sort out regarding the settlement opportunity. Here is what we know so far:

  • Only acute care and critical access hospital claims are eligible.
  • Claims must already be in the appeals process for inpatient-status claims with an admission date prior to October 1, 2013.
  • Services might have been found reasonable and necessary by the Medicare contractor, but treatment as an inpatient was not.
  • Hospitals may choose to settle some claims and continue to appeal others.
  • Hospitals should send their request for settlement to CMS by October 31, 2014.

Many more details are available on the CMS.gov website.

Settle….Or Not?

Eligible hospitals must determine if requesting a settlement offer makes sense for cases in appeal that meet the specified parameters. For some cases, it will make sense to take the 68 percent settlement and cut your losses. For other denials, waiting out the appeal process may be a better choice.

Each denial will be different and each case unique. Time, money and resources must be balanced against the potential revenue retained or returned potential. Audit management directors, in conjunction with their revenue cycle and finance teams, must analyze RAC data for each eligible case.  It’s a complicated equation. And with a deadline of October 31, 2014, there is no time to lose.

About Dawn Crump

Dawn Crump, MA, SSBB, CHC, has been in the healthcare compliance industry for more than 18 years and joined HealthPort in 2013 as Vice President of Audit Management Solutions. Prior to joining HealthPort, Ms. Crump was the Network Director of Compliance for SSM. She is a former board director of the Greater St. Louis Healthcare Finance Management Association chapter and currently serves as the networking chair.

Modeling Health Data Architecture After DNS

Posted on September 12, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was absolutely intrigued by the idea of structuring the healthcare data architecture after DNS. As a techguy, I’m quite familiar with the structure of DNS and it has a lot of advantages (Check out the Wikipedia for DNS if you’re not familiar with it).

There are a lot of really great advantages to a system like DNS. How beautiful would it be for your data to be sent to your home base versus our current system which requires the patient to go out and try and collect the data from all of their health care providers. Plus, the data they get from each provider is never in the same format (unless you consider paper a format).

One challenge with the idea of structuring the healthcare data architecture like DNS is getting everyone a DNS entry. How do you handle the use case where a patient doesn’t have a “home” on the internet for their healthcare data? Will the first provider that you see, sign you up for a home on the internet? What if you forget your previous healthcare data home and the next provider provides you a new home. I guess the solution is to have really amazing merging and transfer tools between the various healthcare data homes.

I imagine that some people involved in Direct Project might suggest that a direct address could serve as the “home” for a patient’s health data. While Direct has mostly been focused on doctors sharing patient data with other doctors and healthcare providers, patients can have a direct address as well. Could that direct address by your home on the internet?

This will certainly take some more thought and consideration, but I’m fascinated by the distributed DNS system. I think we healthcare data interoperability can learn something from how DNS works.

How Does a Practice Deal with All These High Deductible Plans?

Posted on September 11, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Vishal Gandhi, CEO of ClinicSpectrum as part of the Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter @ClinicSpectrum and @csvishal2222.
Vishal Gandhi
One of the biggest trends we’re seeing in healthcare today is a shift towards high deductible plans. This shift first started as more and more employers stopped offering insurance or cut the type of health insurance they offered. This started the trend towards individuals purchasing high deductible insurance plans.

While the shift to high deductible insurance plans started well before the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the government mandated health insurance and associated health insurance exchanges (HIX) have thrown gas on the already flaming fire. What most patients didn’t realize when they signed up for insurance on the government’s HIX is that a large majority of the plans were high deductible insurance plans. This has led to a huge influx in high deductible plans entering medical offices.

What does this increase in high deductible plans mean?
This change is one of the most significant changes in healthcare reimbursement we’ve seen. High deductible plans mean a major shift in who will be paying the bill. Instead of collecting most of your money from insurance companies, your clinic will need to become expert at collecting money from patients as well. Yes, that’s right. You’re still going to have to collect from the insurance companies like before, but you’re going to have to build additional expertise around collecting payments from patients too.

While it’s true that clinics have been collecting payments from patients forever, that doesn’t mean that clinics have been doing a good job of actually collecting the money. In fact, I find practice after practice who hasn’t stayed on top of their patient collections. In the end, they often send their patient collections to a collections agency which frustrates the patients and tarnishes their name or they just write off the patient pay portion completely.

Suggestions to Improve Patient Collections
The first step to improving patient collections is to really understand the details of your patient’s insurance plan. This starts with doing an insurance eligibility check and verifying your patient’s plan details. We wrote about ways to streamline your insurance eligibility checks previously. Doing it right takes time, but with the right workflow automation solutions you can make sure that those working in your practice have the right insurance information. Once they have the right payment information, you’re much more likely to collect the payment from the patient while they’re standing in front of you at the office.

While collecting the patient payment from the patient while their in your office is ideal, there are dozens of reasons why this won’t happen. Some don’t have the money on them. Some walk out before you can collect. Etc etc etc. How then do you engage the patient in the payment process once they’ve left your office? In the past, the best solution was to send out bill after bill through the US postal service or possibly call the patient directly. This is an extremely time consuming and costly process that can take 60 to 90 days to obtain results.Plus, it costs several hours of man power and postage.

In the electronic world we live in, the first thing you can do to improve your patient collection process is to implement an online patient payment portal. This online payment process increases patient collections dramatically. The next generation patient is so unfamiliar with writing checks and sending snail mail, that those payments often get delayed. However, by offering the online patient payment option, you remove this barrier to payment.

The other way to improve patient collections is to use an automated messaging and collection process. This approach uses a collection of text, secure text, email, secure email and even smart phone notifications and automated calls in order to ensure the patient knows about their bill and has the opportunity to pay the bill. Plus, these customized decision rules provide a much more seamless and consistent approach to patient collections.

Conclusion
This movement to the empowered patient with a high deductible insurance plan is not likely to go away. Employers are happily getting out of the health insurance business and many want patients to have more responsibility over the healthcare they receive. Being sure that you have a well thought out patient collection workflow is going to be critical to the ongoing success of any medical practice.

The Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts is sponsored by ClinicSpectrum, a leading provider of workflow automation solutions for healthcare. Their Invoice Spectrum and Auto Collect Spectrum products are a great way to handle the increase in high deductible plans that are entering medical offices.

Proving HIPAA Compliance

Posted on September 9, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Given the name of this blog, I get a lot of people asking me about HIPAA compliance. Many of them that are new to the industry are looking for some sort of regulating or certifying body that they can go to in order to be HIPAA compliant.

Unfortunately, there is no body that can audit you and basically certify that you’re HIPAA compliant. HIPAA is basically a self certification, so you can just claim “compliance.” However, if a real audit happens, you better make sure your ducks are all in a row and that you are actually complying. While there is no body that certifies HIPAA compliance, there are pretty specific guidelines on what you need to do to be HIPAA compliant.

When companies and organizations ask me what they need to do to be HIPAA compliant, I usually suggest they start with these HIPAA trainings from one of my partner companies, 4MedApproved: http://bit.ly/191zR9N (20% discount if you use the code healthcare20 since I’m a partner). The HIPAA compliance officer training will teach you what you need to do and it includes HIPAA documentation templates you can use along with business associate agreement forms. Then, the HIPAA workforce trainings are good to train the rest of your staff. With this training and documentation, you’ll feel much more comfortable saying you’re HIPAA compliant and having something to show for it. You’ll also learn what other places you might be lacking when it comes to HIPAA compliance.

I had someone on a LinkedIn discussion about a breach suggest that organization should regularly train their staff on HIPAA. Turns out that doing so isn’t just a good idea, but is also a HIPAA requirement. Having some sort of proven HIPAA training that you’ve completed is one step in the right direction of proving your HIPAA compliance.

The other major step an organization should take is doing a full HIPAA risk assessment. Many organizations are doing this since they’ve had to in order to get meaningful use money. However, even those organization who aren’t asking for the EHR incentive handout are still required to do a HIPAA risk assessment.

What are you doing in your organization or company to prove HIPAA compliance?

Aligning Incentives Across Disparate P&Ls

Posted on September 8, 2014 I Written By

Kyle is Founder and CEO of Pristine, a company in Austin, TX that develops telehealth communication tools optimized for Google Glass in healthcare environments. Prior to founding Pristine, Kyle spent years developing, selling, and implementing electronic medical records (EMRs) into hospitals. He also writes for EMR and HIPAA, TechZulu, and Svbtle about the intersections of healthcare, technology, and business. All of his writing is reproduced at kylesamani.com

My company sells solutions that typically span multiple avenues of care. We’ve encountered a unique problem: incentives to improve care coordination rarely align when disparate P&Ls accrue to different players across the continuum of care. In other words, split P&Ls pose a destructive risk to care coordination and ultimately outcomes.

How does this play out in the real world?

Ambulances

Most health systems do not own or operate their own ambulances (Atlantic Health System and NS-LIJ being notable exceptions). Instead, ambulances are typically run by local governments or private companies. Why is this a problem? Many of the most critically ill patients arrive to hospitals via ambulance. Many of these patients are are in time-critical conditions. Ambulances should have the best tools to help save those patients and improve outcomes and suffering. All of the care that ambulances provide should be coordinated with the receiving hospital.

However, ambulances, especially publicly-operated ambulances, run on extremely tight margins; they can’t afford to invest in many new technologies. Hospitals won’t invest in tools for ambulances – even for at-risk patients – since hospitals won’t actually control the deployment of the technology to ensure they impact outcomes for at-risk patients.

But what if hospitals owned the ambulances that fed the hospitals? In this model, as hospitals move towards risk-based care-delivery models, incentives will be aligned to deploy mobile technologies into ambulances to improve time-to-care, diagnostics, and even triage patients to avoid hospitalizations entirely. Specifically, what if every ambulance was equipped with a mobile X ray, CT, EKG, ultrasound, and a suite of standard diagnostic tools (blood pressure, thermometer, stethoscope, etc? Upon arriving at a non-emergent patient’s home, the paramedics could locally diagnose and triage the patient with a virtual physician’s input and avoid non-essential ER admissions.

But that can only happen if incentives – specifically P&Ls – are aligned across the continuum of care.

Outsourced physician Management Services (e.g., EmCare)

Many hospitals contract with physician groups to staff service lines in the hospital. Although these groups provide real value – e.g., more flexible hours and operational processes – than employed physicians these groups also break up how P&Ls are accrued.

For example, many anesthesiologists align as a group to contract with hospitals. Within their practice, these MDs may find a new automated anesthesia monitor that enables more effective management of residents and CRNAs across multiple ORs. In turn, anesthesiologists should be able to extend the MD:mid-level ratio, drive improvement in patient safety, and make more money. But, concerns about damage, theft, and losing the hospital contract render these same anesthesiologists unlikely to ever buy the equipment themselves. Hospitals will also be reluctant to invest since they won’t accrue the financial benefits of improved labor productivity since the financial benefits accrue to the anesthesiologist group, not the hospital.

But Modularization Works In Other Industries

Indeed, most value-chain centric industries are highly modular. Each layer of the value chain can independently optimize itself and control how it interacts with the layers of the value chain above and below it. A few examples:

In the movie value chain, movie production studios don’t own and operate theaters; theaters are independent

In the retail value chain, retailers usually don’t act as distributors, and distributors don’t usually act as producers

With the exception of Apple (who by no means control the entire value chain), most of the computing value chain is modular; retailers like Best Buy have no hand in chipset design, chipset manufacturing, OEM design, OEM manufacturing, operating systems, Internet infrastructure, internet service providers, or cloud services.

Modularization In Healthcare Delivery: Can it work?

Healthcare delivery is not a linear value chain. Each player in the healthcare delivery system doesn’t build incremental, linear value on top of its suppliers. Rather, healthcare delivery involves the coordination of a breadth of disparate resources to A) diagnose, B) treat, and, C) manage chronic conditions / maintain wellness (these are the three different businesses that Clayton Christensen astutely observes in his excellent book, The Innovator’s Prescription).

Healthcare could perhaps be modularized if a certain set of providers acted to diagnose a patient, then handed off the patient to another set of providers for treatment, who in turn would transfer the patient to another set of providers whose job it was to manage ongoing chronic care. However, this arrangement is only tenable if: 1) the boundaries between these three different businesses are clear and distinct, and 2) the providers in each have a high degree of confidence in the “output” from their “suppliers” (e.g., an accurate diagnosis).

What are your thoughts? Have you seen other scenarios where disparate P&Ls lead to mis-aligned incentives? Have you seen risk-based payment models that successfully bridge disparate P&Ls?