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HIMSS15 Social Media and Influencer Thoughts

Posted on April 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I think this has been the case the past couple years. The Tuesday of HIMSS seems to always be my day of social media. This year was no different. This was highlighted by a meetup that Shahid Shah and myself did at the HIMSS spot. At first I wasn’t sure if anyone would show for the event. Luckily, 1-2 people were there early and so at least we wouldn’t be talking to ourselves. In fact, Shahid asked for those that weren’t there for the meetup to free up the seats for those that were there for it. Luckily, when I wasn’t watching a whole bunch of people showed up and the event was standing room only. I guess Shahid can really draw a crowd.

What was impressive was the mix of the audience. There was a large group of some of the most influential people in social media (I won’t name names since there were too many and I’ll forget someone), along with a number of newer people. I love that mix and particularly love the new people that are still finding their way. Sometimes they seem a bit like dear in the headlights. That’s ok. That’s part of the fun of learning.

What’s clear to me is that social influencing as really matured for many people, but there are still a lot of people that are trying to figure it out. It’s amazing to see the difference. I’ll be interested to watch this evolve. I still see so much opportunity with it and many aren’t taking advantage of it.

Then, my night was capped off with the New Media Meetup at HIMSS15. This is the 6th year I’ve hosted this event and it seems to get better each year. I’m always humbled by the list of people that register to attend. Plus, I’m extremely appreciative of Stericycle and Patient Prompt that basically through a big party for all these amazing people. It’s always amazing to see the broad spectrum of people that attend and how down to earth they are even given many of their significant social influence. Plus, what an amazing preview for the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference.

I didn’t go into many details on what was at the session or who attending the New Media Meetup, but you can get a lot of that information by checking out the #HITMC hashtag. Thanks to all of my new and old social media friends that made today special. I keep learning from you.

I’ll leave this with just one insight that really hit home to me when I shared it in the meetup. Really caring about the people you’re connecting with, the topics you’re sharing and the work you’re doing really comes through in social media. If you’re faking it, people will usually see that. Plus, really caring about those you connect with on social media and the things you share will change your life in really amazing ways.

Reminds me of the wrestler, Jessie Ventura who became governor of Minnesota. One time I heard him say he didn’t have to have a good memory, because he always said what he thought and never told things that were half true. On social media, if you’re faking it, it makes it hard to remember all the things you’ve faked. If you’re authentic and real, it makes it so much easier.

A Few Quick HIMSS15 Thoughts

Posted on April 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today’s been a long day packed with meetings at HIMSS 2015. I need to reach out to HIMSS to get the final numbers, but word is that there are over 40,000 people at the show. In the hallways, the exhibit hall and the taxi lines it definitely seems to be the case. I’m not sure the jump in attendees, but I saw one tweet that IBM had 400 people there. Don’t quote me on it since I can’t find the tweet, but that’s just extraordinary to even consider that many people from one company.

Of course, the reason I can’t find the tweet is that the Twitter stream has been setting new records each day. The HIMSS 2015 Twitter Tips and Tricks is valuable if you want to get value out of the #HIMSS15 Twitter stream. I also have to admit that I might be going a bit overboard on the selfies. I think I’ve got the @mandibpro selfie disease. Not sure the treatment for it since my doctor doesn’t do a telemedicine visit while I’m in Chicago.

I’ve had some amazing meetings that will inform my blog posts for weeks to come. However, my biggest takeaway from the first official day of HIMSS is that change is in the air. The forces are at work to make interoperability a reality. It’s going to be a massive civil war as the various competing parties battle it out as they set the pathway forward.

You might think that this is a bit of an exaggeration, but I think it’s pretty close to what’s happening. What’s not clear to me is whose going to win and what the final outcome will look like. There are so many competing interests that are trying to get at the data and make it valuable for the doctor and health system.

Along those lines, I’m absolutely fascinated by the real time analytics capabilities that I saw being built. A number of companies I talked to are moving beyond the standard batch loaded enterprise data warehouse approach to a real time (or as one vendor said…we all have to call it near real time) stream of data. I think this is going to drive a massive change in innovation.

I’ll be talking more about the various vendors I saw and their approaches to this in future posts after HIMSS. While I’m excited by some of the many things these companies are doing, I still feel like many of them are constrained by their inability to get to the data. A number of them were working on such small data sets. This was largely because they can’t get the other data. One vendor told me that their biggest challenge is getting an organization to turn over their data for them for analysis.

While it’s important that organizations are extremely careful with how they handle and share their data. More organizations should be working with trusted partners in order to extract more value out of the data and to more importantly make new discoveries. The discoveries we’re making today are really great, but I can only imagine how much more we could accomplish with more data to inform those discoveries.

Recorded Video from Dell Healthcare Think Tank Event – #DoMoreHIT

Posted on March 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I mentioned that I was going to be on the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event again this year. It was my 3rd time participating and it didn’t disappoint. In fact, this one dove into a number of insurance topics which we hadn’t ever covered before. I really learned a lot from the discussions and hopefully others learned from me.

Plus, in the first session I had the privilege to sit next to Dr. Eric Topol. He’s got such great insights into what’s happening in healthcare. Of course, I’m also always amazed by Mandi Bishop, who many of you may know from Twitter or her Eyes Wide Shut series here on EMR and HIPAA.

In case you missed the live stream of the event, you can find each of the three recorded sessions below. I also posted the 3 drawings that were created during the event on EMR and EHR. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on what was shared. Thanks Dell for hosting the conversation that brought together so many perspectives from across healthcare.

Session 1: Consumer Engagement & Social Media

Session 2: Bridging the Gap Between Providers, Payers and Patients

Session 3: Entrepreneurship & Innovation

Crowdfunding Medical Bills

Posted on February 3, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently had a friend send over a Give Forward campaign for the Faul Family Recovery Fund. I don’t know the family, but they have three autistic children and one fo the daughters has a severe congenital heart defect. To top if off, the Father is autistic and suffers from depression and lost his job thanks to these health challenges. Such an amazing situation.

It’s no wonder that this family is having financial challenges and needs people to support their GiveForward campaign. We’ve all heard that medical bills is the #1 source of bankruptcy in the US. It’s expensive to get the treatment you need when you have a chronic illness.

With that said, I’m really intrigued by these crowd funding platforms that help people like the Faul Family raise money from family, friends and other caring people in order to help cover their medical expenses. The campaign I mentioned has currently raised $4,225 and they’re trying to raise $25,000. That’s not a small sum of money, but is much more manageable when a crowd of caring people are all contributing their Starbucks money to someone in need. The site has raised nearly $150 million this way. That’s amazing!

While Give Forward can be used for a lot of things, the medical category seems to dominate. A look through the medical category puts a face, a name and a story to healthcare in a way that those outside of healthcare rarely see. Walking through the list is both expiring and heart wrenching. Something that those on the front lines of healthcare see every day.

As someone who writes about healthcare, IT, and social media I’m really intrigued by the crowdfunding of medical bills. No doubt it’s a lifesaver for so many involved and likely gets a lot of doctors and hospitals paid that would otherwise get paid. I think those are great things. Plus, I think there’s value to all of us to give of ourselves to others.

I guess I just wonder if this will become a predominant model or how this model will evolve over time. Every hospital in the nation has stories like this walking through their doors every day. Should healthcare organizations be partnering with these crowdfunding platforms? Where do you think all of this is going?

Social Media Platforms and Techniques for Medical Practices

Posted on December 18, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Barry Haitoff, CEO of Medical Management Corporation of America.
Barry Haitoff
In my previous post I talked about the benefits of using social media in a medical practice and I said that the next post in the series would take a look at the tools, techniques, and social media platforms you should use to help you realize the benefits of social media. This will not be an exhaustive look at social media platforms or the way to get the most out of them. However, it will be a good place for you to start and will offer some techniques that those who’ve started might not have heard about.

First, a word of warning. When starting to work with social media, be sure to pace yourself appropriately. As you start working with a specific social media platform, you might want to start “sprinting” and dive really deep into the product. That’s a great way to develop a deep understanding of the platform, but it’s not sustainable. After doing a deep dive into a social media platform, find a sustainable rhythm that your practice can sustain long term.

Social media is a marathon, not a sprint.

Facebook – With nearly 800 million active users, it’s hard to ignore the power of Facebook. Given these numbers, the majority of patients are on Facebook and they’re likely talking with their friends about their doctors. Unlike many other social media platforms, most people are connected to their real life friends on Facebook. That means the focus of your work on Facebook should be to help your most satisfied patients be able to remember to share this with their friends as the need arises.

On Facebook this usually takes the form of a practice Facebook page that your patients can “like.” Invite your patients to like your Facebook page when they’re in your office or through your patient portal. You can even test some Facebook advertising using your internal email list to get your patients to like your page. However, the most important thing you can do is to make sure you regularly update your Facebook page with quality content. That way, they will want to like your page when they find it.

When it comes to content, put yourself in the shoes of your patients and think about what content you would find useful as a patient. Don’t be afraid to post things that represent the values of your practice, but may not be specific to your practice. In most cases, what you’re sharing on Facebook is more about helping that patient remember your practice as opposed to trying to sell them something. For example, it’s more effective to post something entertaining that your patients will like and comment on than it is to post some dry sales piece that they’ll ignore.

Twitter – Similar to Facebook, you want to create a two step process with Twitter. First, think about content you can post to your Twitter feed that would be useful to your patients and prospective patients. No matter what marketing methods you employ to increase Twitter followers, if your Twitter account isn’t posting interesting, useful, funny, entertaining, or informative content, then no one will follow you.

Second, find and engage with people in your area that could be interested in the services you offer. Finding them is pretty easy thanks to the advanced Twitter search. When you first start on Twitter you’re going to want to spend a bit of time on that search page as you figure out what search terms (including location) are going to be most valuable to your clinic. Sometimes you’ll have to be creative. For example, if you’re an ortho doctor, you might want to check out search terms and followers of a local youth rec league.

Once you find potential patients on Twitter, follow them from your account and engage with those you find interesting. Just to be clear, a tweet saying “Come visit our office: [LINK]” is not engagement. Offering them answers to their questions or links to appropriate resources (possibly on your website, blog, or Facebook page) is a great form of engagement. You’ll be amazed how consistently following and engaging with potential patients over time will build your Twitter profile. Once they’ve followed your account, you have created a long term connection with that person.

As I suggested in my previous post, Twitter can be a great way to find patients, but it can also be a great way for your practice to connect and learn from peers and colleagues. I’d suggest using different accounts for each effort. The tweets you create for each will likely be quite different so don’t mix the two. However, the same search and engagement suggestions apply whether you’re connecting with patients or colleagues. The search terms will just be quite different.

Physician Review/Rating Websites
There are dozens of physician rating and review websites out there today. Some of the top ones include: Health Grades, Angie’s List, ZocDoc, Yelp, Google Local, and many more. Which of these websites you should engage with usually depends on where you live. In most cases one or two of these websites are dominant in a region. For example, Yelp is extremely popular in San Francisco while Angie’s List is very popular in the south.

Discovering which one is most popular in your region is pretty easy. Many of your patients will have told you that they found your practice through these sites. However, you can also do a search on each of these services and see which ones are most active. A Google search for your specialty and city is another way for you to know which services are likely popular in your area.

Many of these sites will let you claim your profile and be able to respond to any reviews. Do it (although, don’t pay for it). Responding to reviews is a powerful way to engage your patients. If they post a bad review, keep calm and show compassion, understanding, and a willingness to help and that bad review will become good. Plus, that negative review could be an opportunity for you to improve your practice. If they post a good review, show gratitude for them trusting you as their doctor.

Once you’ve discovered which website is most valuable in your region, encourage your satisfied patients to go on that site and post a review of your practice. In some cases that might be handing the patient a reminder to rate you as they leave. In other cases, you might send them an email after their visit asking for them to review you on one of these sites. With mobile phones being nearly ubiquitous, a sign in the office can encourage a review as well.

Summary
There are hundreds of social media platforms out there today. However, if you focus on the platforms and techniques I mention above, you’ll be off to a great start. Mastering these techniques will make sure you get the most value out of your social media efforts.

Medical Management Corporation of America, a leading provider of medical billing services, is a proud sponsor of EMR and HIPAA.

Social Networks In Healthcare: Breaking Down Barriers To Change

Posted on December 4, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Ivo Nelson, Chairman of the Board of Next Wave Connect.
Ivo Nelson
As U.S. hospitals, professionals, and patients from coast to coast grapple with a daunting maize of healthcare challenges that’s growing more complex each day, it’s easy to forget that the solutions we need might just be sitting in someone else’s back yard.  And no matter who might own those great ideas, harvesting their value depends upon finding the best ways to share and make the most of them.

Both of these themes were at the heart of an exceptional two-day event I attended in Copenhagen recently, hosted by Healthcare DENMARK.  Called “The Ambassadors’ Summit,” each participant was invited to attend based upon his or her lifetime healthcare-industry contributions.  The Summit provided our group the opportunity to compare ideas and benchmark best practices with peers from around the world.  And while every national representative had something valuable to offer, some of the best thinking came directly from our hosts themselves.

Denmark has long stood out among nations for its health system, which is differentiated by its fundamental focus on the patient.  The Danish system functions by placing the patient in the center of its care-delivery circle.  Patients’ involvement in their own care is essential for the system to work.  And while few argue that patients should have a greater say in their own care, in Denmark they really do.

Because the Danes have made healthcare a true national – not political — priority, there’s a team mentality country-wide to support it – to improve it continuously over time.  It was this commitment that led Healthcare DENMARK to hold the Summit in the first place: they recognized that every country around the world has its own best practices to offer for consideration.  For example, Summit Ambassadors from Germany brought participants their expertise in international healthcare systems, managed care, integrated care, secure data transfer, and theoretic medicine, among others.  Colleagues from the United Kingdom shared insights from their roles in organizations like the World Health Care Congress and in subject areas such as healthcare analytics and health system financing, to name a few.

At the end of the Summit, we all agreed to return a year from now having advanced our own care systems by harnessing and developing the rich ideas we’d shared in just 48 hours.  Easily said, but what will prove the best means of connecting all the ideas in all those back yards?  The answer is social media used smartly – in a way that establishes closely defined social networks that engage communities interested in solving very specific problems.

As I left the Summit, I could already envision a new group of social communities that could invite the participation of the leaders who contributed so much to the Ambassadors Summit – effectively creating real-time conversations around the key issues that concerned each one of us.  For example, we could launch a new community with a “Danish voice” to advance our nation’s work to increase patient centricity.  Another smart social network could consider the construction of new hospitals and the consolidation of existing ones.  Other smart social healthcare communities could focus on medical homes, the roles of primary-care physicians, and the true connectivity of personal health records.

The possibilities are energizing because they are so clearly within our reach.  With the smart use of social platforms, global boundaries lose relevance, great meetings like the Ambassadors Summit never have to adjourn, and our power to drive a world of better care increases exponentially.

What Are The Benefits of a Medical Practice Participating in Social Media?

Posted on November 17, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest post by Barry Haitoff, CEO of Medical Management Corporation of America.
Barry Haitoff
No doubt social media has become an integral part of many of our lives. We use it in our personal lives and if we don’t use it personally, our children are using it all the time. With nearly 800 million daily active users on Facebook and nearly 300 million monthly active users on Twitter, most medical practices are asking how they could benefit from having their practice participate in social media.

Before I begin with the specific benefits of social media use, I should define how I’m using the term social media. In this case, I’ll be talking about social media in the broadest context. Certainly this would include platforms like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Google+. However, I also include healthcare focused websites like Health Grades, Angie’s List, ZocDoc, Yelp, and many more in this list. Each of these websites or mobile apps has a social aspect to them which allows the practice to engage with patients online.

Now let’s take a look at some of the benefits your practice can receive from your participation in social media.

Be Part of the Discussion – The reality of the internet is that your practice is being discussed online whether you participate or not. Many of the social media sites listed above have already created your profile and patients are talking about their experience at your practice. While you may wish that this wasn’t the case, it’s something that you can’t stop.

Given that you can’t stop patients from posting information about their visit to your office, it really benefits your practice to keep an eye on what’s being said about your practice on these social media sites. If someone posts something nice, that’s an opportunity for your practice to show some gratitude for their kindness. If someone posts something negative, that’s an opportunity for you to show some compassion even when difficult situations arise.

When a negative physician review is shown compassion, understanding, and a willingness to help, it turns a negative into a positive for your practice. Now instead of driving patients away from your practice, a sincere interest in helping the disgruntled patient will drive new patients to your practice who realize that you care about your patients. Of course, if you’re not taking part in social media, that negative comment will remain and discourage patients from ever visiting your office.

First Impressions – One of the first impressions many patients get about your practice is on your website and your social media presence. While it’s not the end all be all for how patients select a doctor, being an active participant in social media shows potential new patients that you’re a progressive organization that stays on top of the latest trends. If you’re not on social media and/or your website looks like it came out of the 90’s, many patients will wonder how well your practice keeps up with more important areas like clinical skills. Right or wrong, we draw these connections between a practice’s online presence and their ability to stay up with the latest medicine.

Engage Current Patients – Social media is a great way for your organization to engage with your current patients. One of the largest sources of new patient referrals comes from existing patients. A simple follow on Twitter or Like on Facebook creates a powerful connection between your practice and your patients. That connection then serves as a reminder to your patients of the services you provide. You’ll be surprised at the serendipity of social media. Your social media post on back pain can often arrive in the same stream as one of your patient’s friend’s complaint of back pain. Now you just gave your previous patient a simple way to refer their friend to you.

Promote High Margin Services – This doesn’t apply to all specialties, but many specialties have high margin services they can offer patients on a repeat basis. Other specialties can remind their patients of annual visits. Social media is a simple, scalable way to inform and remind patients of these high margin services. With the right set of followers, a simple tweet that says “Women, take care of yourself! Don’t forget to get your annual pap smear.” can be a really effective way to drive more patients to your practice.

Local Social Media – One challenge medical practices face is that the majority of their patient population is local. Social media and the internet by its very nature is a national and international tool. However, with the integration of GPS into every phone and location enabled web browsers, the websites and tools to target local people are amazing. Do a simple Twitter search for “back pain” and add your location and you’ll find a captive audience of people with back pain near you. Here’s a simple example I found in NYC. Once you find these potential patients, you can easily follow or engage with their tweet.

Learn from Others – While much of this list has been about driving more high quality patients to your practice, social media can also be an excellent way for doctors, practice managers, billing staff, etc to learn from their peers. You can find a community of peers on social media that are focused on pretty much any element of a medical practice. Many of them are posting amazing content which can help you learn how to do your job better. Plus, as you engage with your peers on social media, you create relationships which can be leveraged to get answers to difficult questions. Not to mention, you’ll receive the satisfaction of helping other people and developing deep friendships with amazing people. Social media is a font of knowledge just waiting for you to tap into it.

In the next post in our series, I’ll look at the tools, techniques, and social media platforms you should use to help you realize the benefits mentioned above. Are there other social media benefits I missed on my list? I’d love to hear how you’re using social media in your practice and the benefits you’ve received from it.

Medical Management Corporation of America, a leading provider of medical billing services, is a proud sponsor of EMR and HIPAA.

Google Helpouts Tested in Google Search Results – Dr. Google?

Posted on October 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It was first noticed by someone on Reddit and then confirmed by Engadget that Google has been testing a Google Helpout style feature which offers a telemedicine video visit with a doctor. You can see an image of the test Google search telemedicine integration below:
Google Helpout - Google Search Integration

This is a really interesting integration for a number of reasons. First, Google wasn’t charging for these initial test visits, but would no doubt charge for these visits in the future. Second, it takes an Act of God to get Google to integrate something into their cash cow: search results. That should tell us how serious Google is about doing these types of integrations.

I can already hear the naysayers who think this is a terrible idea. They might be right as a business. We’ll have to see how that plays out. The reimbursement model could a challenging one. Plus, there are plenty of reasons why this won’t work. Google will have to get really good at knowing when to offer a visit and when not to offer a visit. We’ll see if they want to make the investment required to understand when the visit is something that should be encouraged and when it shouldn’t be encouraged.

One thing I’ve observed with Telemedicine is that it can really work well…if you have the right situation. The reason Telemedicine has gotten a bad rap is that the naysayers have plenty of ammo they can use to explain why Telemedicine could be a terrible thing. These naysayers are correct. There are a bunch of healthcare situations where a telemedicine visit just isn’t going to work. However, just because something doesn’t solve 100% of the situations doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be used for the 30% of the time (I think it could be more than this) that it’s a beautifully elegant solution that’s just as effective as an in office visit?

As noted, this was just at trial by Google. Google is well known for trying things to see how they do and then scraping them after the trial. So, we’ll see how this goes. It does seem that Google can’t keep its hands out of healthcare. I think they see the trillion dollar industry and just can’t resist.

Comprehensive Patient View, Social Media Time, and Linking Millions of EMR

Posted on August 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


You don’t really need to click on the link above. The answer is no. The answer is that it probably won’t ever happen. There are just too many source systems where our health data is stored and it’s getting more complicated, not less.


If the social media maven Mandi has a challenge getting her social media on, now you can understand why many others “don’t have the time.” It takes a commitment and many don’t want to make that commitment. It doesn’t make them bad people. We all only have so many hours in a day.


No need to read this link either. Although, I found it great that they described the challenge as linking millions of EMR. Let’s be generous and say there are 700 EHR vendors. Unfortunately, that doesn’t describe what it takes to make EMR interoperable. To use a cliche phrase, if you’ve connected with one Epic installation, you’ve connected with one Epic installation. I know it’s getting better, but it’s not there. If you want interoperable EMR data, you need to connect a lot of different installs.

Taking Down Dr. Oz

Posted on July 23, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I briefly mentioned Dr. Oz in my recent post about NY Med (and the healthcare social media firing). It’s clear to anyone watching the show that Dr. Oz is there for the celebrity factor and not for the actual medical work. He’s always “partnered” with another cardiologist who provides the actual patient care. Of course, I don’t really care too much that he’s on it or not. If it gives them a boost in ratings, good. I like the show.

However, I don’t know a single doctor that likes Dr. Oz and I know many of them who hate Dr. Oz. With this in mind, I found this interview with a medical student whose trying to “take down” Dr. Oz quite interesting. Here’s a short take on what this med student is doing:

Last year, Mazer brought a policy before the Medical Society of the State of New York—where Dr. Oz is licensed—requesting that they consider regulating the advice of famous physicians in the media. His idea: Treat health advice on TV in the same vein as expert testimony, which already has established guidelines for truthfulness.

Although, this quote is really powerful as well, “DR. OZ HAS SOMETHING LIKE 4-MILLION VIEWERS A DAY. THE AVERAGE PHYSICIAN DOESN’T SEE A MILLION PATIENTS IN THEIR LIFETIME.”

This is absolutely one of the problems with social media and other medium like television. The person with the biggest voice doesn’t always have the best information. In fact, sometimes the wrong information is the best way to grow an audience. What’s popular is not always what’s right.

Mazer in his interview highlights the biggest problem with some of the things that Dr. Oz says. The movement in healthcare has largely been towards evidence based medicine. I think that movement will only grow stronger as we can prove the effectiveness of care even better. However, many of the things on Dr. Oz’s show go contrary to evidence based medicine. This leaves the patient-doctor relationship at a cross roads when a patient chooses to follow something they’ve seen on TV versus the advice of the doctor (even if the doctor is on the side of evidence).

Dr. Oz aside, the same principle applies to other information patients might find on the internet. Many doctors would like to just brush this aside and say that patients should “trust” them since there’s bad information on the internet or there’s a bigger picture. That might work in the short term, but won’t last long term.

Long term doctors are going to have to take a collaborative approach with patients. As patients we just have to be careful that we don’t take it too far. Collaboration means that the patient needs to be collaborative as well.

The other way for doctors to battle the misinformation out there is to provide quality sources of trusted information. One way this will happen is on the physician website. Instead of being a glorified yellow page ad, the physician website is going to have to do more to engage and educate patients. That’s part of the opportunity and vision for Physia. It’s an exciting time to be in healthcare…if you like change.