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Do You Periscope?

Posted on August 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently started to play around with Periscope. Have you been using it? Or have you been watching other people’s Periscopes? For those not familiar with the technology (or its competitor Meerkat), Periscope is a super simple way to live stream video from a mobile device. In literally a few clicks of your mobile screen, you can live stream pretty much anything.

Charles Webster is officially a Periscope addict and wrote a great post about why he’s become an addict and some of its healthcare IT uses. Here’s a section of that post:

I’ve fallen hard for Periscope, Twitter’s new live video streaming app. Despite a long list of “But…”s (privacy, flakey clients, low rez video, difficulty finding the best videos in real-time, trolls…), the idea itself — “Explore the world in real time through someone else’s eyes” — is great, perhaps even, dare I say, revolutionary. For example, yesterday I explored the world of EHR and health IT medical office workflow through the eyes of a patient and her physician. (By the way, the Periscope link is only good for 24 hours, so will cease to work today around 2PM EST. See further below for YouTube archive. The Periscope is to be preferred, because it includes comments and hearts.) I’ve surfed off the coast of Australia. I’ve admired kittens online (now, that IS revolutionary!).

Personally, I’m not as taken by Periscope as Chuck. The video quality isn’t as good. It’s not as fun for me to do by myself, but it is fun to do at a party where there are a lot of people. If you’re on a busy periscope, the chat messages get lost in the wave of messages. The hearting in periscope is nice unless you’re in a busy periscope where the hearts just never stop.

I’ll admit that the few periscopes I’ve done personally have felt really awkward. Dr. James Legan described it this way:

All of this said, I love to try new technologies and understand what’s going on by getting my hands a little dirty. Periscope is part of a trend around live streamed video that’s been happening for a lot of years now. Periscope has just taken it to another level of ease. Before it took a bit of technical skill to live stream video everywhere. Now anyone can do it with Periscope and it takes almost no effort. That’s something to watch.

Still don’t believe me? According to a post which is a few weeks old, there are over 10 million periscope accounts. Plus, they’re seeing over 40 years of video watched every day. I’m sure that’s number even larger today. Will this be a passing fad? I don’t think so since it’s really just the continued evolution of live streamed video.

I’m still not sure all the impact for good and bad of all this live streamed video. However, there’s something compelling about someone taking you live into their life. The list of Periscopes I’ve seen is quite different than Chuck’s list above. However, it’s just as broad of a spectrum of things and it’s great that we each have a customized experience of what’s interesting to us. There’s something really exciting about the discovery of something new or a look into something you’ve never seen before. It’s like going backstage into someone’s life. Everyone likes a behind the scenes look into something.

Consider this the start to my exploration of new technology. I’d love to hear your thoughts on Periscope. Have you used it? Have you found it valuable? Does it scare you? How will we see it used in healthcare?

The Power of Writing Regularly

Posted on August 3, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare Writing

Anyone who has written something regularly will appreciate the image above. The final sentiment is the important one: Writing is really hard work. Although, it produces amazing results.

At the recent HIM Summit, I participated in a session on social media where we covered LinkedIn, Twitter, and blogging. One of the key messages I tried to convey to attendees was the power in sharing your ideas. This is true on a forum in a group discussion or in blogging (and to a lesser extent on Twitter). Many people think that participating in these various social media platforms is about connection. Connection is a valuable benefit of social media engagement, but I think that the value of what you learn from writing is even more powerful.

In many ways, this concept was illustrated in my post that blogging requires you to raise your standard. It’s one thing to know something. It’s another thing to be able to do something. It’s another thing to know something and be able to do something so well that you can share it with other people. That’s the power of writing a blog or participating in a group where you share deep discussions. You have to really deeply know the subject to be able to write about it. That’s powerful!

Along with raising the bar of how deeply we understand a certain topic, publishing our thoughts and ideas on these social platforms provides people the opportunity to tell us we’re wrong. Ok, that’s probably a harsh way of saying it. The more politically correct way to say it might be to say that it provides people the opportunity to give us feedback on ways we can improve. No matter how you frame it, hundreds and thousands of people reading your content means that dozens will point out flaws in your thinking/process/ideas or they’ll add on with more details on how you can extend what you’re doing. That’s powerful!

I share this concept based on first hand experience. I wouldn’t know 1/100th of the things I know if I didn’t write on the Healthcare Scene blogs so regularly. Doing so requires me to really process ideas into something manageable and understandable. I have to also thank the tens of thousands of you who’ve educated me on things I didn’t understand previously. I’m better for it.

If you’re not writing regularly, I suggest you do it. I’m not suggesting everyone start a blog. You can and should if you’re really committed to doing it regularly, but most shouldn’t go that direction. Instead, you should guest post on other people’s sites or leverage LinkedIn’s new blogging platform where you have a built in audience (your connections) and there’s little expectation of how often you blog.

Try it out and see. You’ll realize that writing is hard. However, the benefits of doing so are powerful as well. As I’ve found regularly in life, the most powerful things are often the hardest.

The 2015 #HIT99 Results Are In

Posted on July 31, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Thanks to everyone who participated in the #HIT99. The #HIT99 was announced on July 6th and nominations were opened. We saw a wide variety of nominations and a lot of new additions that I’d never seen before. For me the #HIT99 and #HIT100 are all about social discovery and showing gratitude to your social media peers. I know I experienced both of those during the process. I hope you did as well.

A big shout out to Steve Sisko (@shimcode) for aggregating, cleaning, and otherwise analyzing all of the data associated with #HIT99 nominations. I can only imagine the time he spent working on it. It’s hard work, so thank you Steve!

No list like this would be appropriate without recognition of Michael Planchart (@theEHRGuy) who created the first (and many subsequent) #HIT100. Hopefully this list will honor what he started.

Details:
Here are a few quick observations on the rankings and participation:

  • Includes all tweets tagged with #HIT99 and/or #HIT100 from 7/6/15 through 7/27/15
  • 633 accounts made nominations
  • 319 UNIQUE accounts were nominated
  • Total of 1650 valid nominations were made
  • People were allowed to vote for themselves
  • RT’s of a nomination were counted but only once. (meaning if a person RT’d multiple tweets made by different accounts and that RT contained a nomination already contained in a different tweet the person RT’d, then only one instance of the nomination via RT would be counted)

And a few other notes about the #HIT99 and #HIT100 data that was collected and posted below:

  • Steve Sisko is cleaning up the raw data so it can be posted and shared with the community. You can watch for it to be posted on Steve’s blog shortly. Update: You can download the raw #HIT99 data here.
  • Feel free to post the #HIT99 list to your blog, social media site, paper, LinkedIn group, tattooed on your chest, or wherever else you’d like to post it. Share away. No attribution is necessary unless you want to attribute the #HIT99 community on Twitter.

We really hope that those in the community will take the #HIT99 data and do really cool things with it well beyond what I’ve posted below and what Steve will post on his site. If you need some inspiration or want to join forces, you might start by looking at what Don Lee (@dflee30) has started doing.

I personally thought it would be fun to post 3 interesting lists for great healthcare social discovery: the #HIT99, New Additions to the #HIT99, and #HIT99 Nominees with 1 Vote. So, without further ado, here are those lists: Read more..

Voting for the #HIT99 Starts Now!

Posted on July 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

A few of my healthcare social media friends were talking about why there was no #HIT100 this year and suggested that in true social media fashion someone should pick it up and run with it and I was nominated. I’m always happy to run with a good idea. Especially when @ShimCode offered to take care of the hard work. We also wanted to respect that we didn’t start the #HIT100 and so we created our modified version called the #HIT99. In open source we’d call that a fork of the original project. Hopefully we can still have the same spirit of fun and healthcare social media discovery that was embodied by the original #HIT100 (See last year’s unofficial list).

The first #HIT100 was started by @theEHRGuy as a great way to celebrate the Fourth of July holiday and turned out to be a fun way to get to know many of the various healthcare social media influencers throughout the summer. This summer we hope we can do the same with the #HIT99.

If you missed past versions, the #HIT99 is a way for you to recognize your peers, friends, and heroes who have been contributing to the #HealthIT, #HITsm, #hcsm, #HITchicks, #hcldr, and other related communities through their tweets, blogs, books, etc. Your nomination is a small reward for their efforts and all of the nominations in aggregate make for an amazing list of people working to improve healthcare. Plus, we’re looking at having a great #HIT99 celebration/meetup at 2016 HIMSS in Las Vegas as well.

In order to make the nominations more meaningful, we ask that all nominations include the person being nominated, the #HIT99 hashtag, and a short phrase or hashtag identifying why you’re nominating that person. Explaining “Why” is not required, but you’ll receive bonus points from the person you’re nominating and the rest of the community for doing so.

Here’s an example nomination: “I nominate @HITConfGuy to the #HIT99 list, because he makes it easy for me to filter through the mass of tweets during HIMSS.”

We’ll be using the following rules for counting nominations:
1. Twitter accounts must have existed prior to today.
2. The nomination process is completely socially biased, but we’ll filter obvious abuse where reasonable (Did the Chilean Princess with no followers really nominate you?).
3. RTs will be counted if they include the required elements.
4. Thank you RTs by the person being nominated will not be counted, but we do encourage sincere gratitude being expressed to those who nominate you. If you remove the nomination from your tweet you’ll have more room to show thanks without cluttering the stream.
5. There will only be one round of voting.
6. Please do not include the #HITsm or other hashtags unless they apply to the person(s) being nominated. Let’s be conscious of unnecessarily adding tweets to everyone’s stream.
7. Nominations will be counted at the sole discretion of the hosts (This is for fun anyway, so don’t stress it.)
8. Last but not least, you must have lots of fun!

I’m looking forward to seeing all the nominations and the final list of 99 healthcare social media influencers. Plus, I can’t wait for all the tweets joking that they’re part of the 99.

Legal Disclaimer: By submitting a nomination, you agree that any statements are your own opinion otherwise you would not have written or tweeted the message. All statements, whether funny or not, are your own information and thoughts. Funny tweets add no weight to your vote, but if you make us laugh we’ll love you for it. All other generic disclaimers apply, we just couldn’t take up any more words to state them.
Thanks @Matt_R_Fisher

Past #HIT100 Lists:
2014 #HIT100
2013 #HIT100
2012 #HIT100
2011 #HIT100

Are You a Healthcare IT Troublemaker or Rebel?

Posted on June 3, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What a great image and list! I’m going to be chewing on this one for a while. I think it’s a fine line between troublemaker and rebel. Although, at it’s core I’d suggest that the main difference is motivation. A person or organizations motivation will make all the difference.

As I think about social media, I can think of a lot of healthcare IT troublemakers and rebels. Social media has a way of really exposing people as troublemakers or rebels. It’s hard to hide your motivation on social media.

Now I’m going to go and chew on whether I’m a troublemaker or rebel.

How Will Patients Choose Healthcare?

Posted on May 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent conversation with Medhost CEO, Bill Anderson, he asked the question that’s the title of this blog post: “How Will Patients Choose Healthcare?” He then proceeded to answer his question by saying, “Healthcare will buy on brand like they do in their other purchasing decisions.” It’s worth adding that Bill and Medhost are working to build their YourCare Everywhere brand in healthcare. You can decide if their business efforts are skewing his perspective or not.

For me, I find the question absolutely fascinating and an extremely important question for healthcare organizations. This question is becoming more and more important since the shift to high deductible plans is forcing patients to be more selective in how they choose their healthcare provider. Will brand be the way that people choose healthcare?

One challenge I have with this idea is that healthcare is a complex decision. I don’t know many people who make impulse healthcare provider decisions. I wonder if there are other complex decisions we could learn from. What is true is that healthcare decisions are often crisis decisions. In a crisis, where do people turn? I think the answer is the brands they know.

As I look at healthcare, which organizations have a true national healthcare brand? The first one that comes to mind is Mayo Clinic. Cleveland Clinic seems to be working down a similar path. Are their others? There are very few national healthcare brands that are trusted.

There are many local healthcare brands. Dignity Health has been pouring money into commercials in Vegas to build their brand. I assure you the commercials are all brand. Intermountain has a brand in Utah and Partners Healthcare has a brand in Boston. We could argue whether they have good or bad brands since they are both so dominant in their region. There are many other examples of local healthcare brands.

On the other side of healthcare brands is the CVS Minute Clinic, Walmart, and all the other retailers trying to make a space for themselves in healthcare. Also competing for brand recognition with a similar direct to consumer, retail healthcare play are the telemedicine providers like MD Live.

Long story short, we’re seeing patients having more power when it comes to selecting their healthcare provider and we see a ton of brand competition. Will a healthcare organization be able to survive without a major investment in their brand? What does this mean for small physician practices?

I’d love to hear your thoughts about what’s happening with healthcare brands. Do they matter? In what ways will they matter? What should a healthcare organization be doing to shore up its brand?

Healthcare Big Data Use, Real Patient Engagement, and Practice Marketing

Posted on May 5, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I use to do these a lot more and I think people enjoyed them. So, maybe I’ll start doing them again. It’s basically a short Twitter round up of some interesting tweets and often some pithy commentary about the tweets. Let me know what you think.


This seems about in line with my own personal experience talking to people. Although, some might argue that 100% are clueless. We’re all still trying to figure out all the data.


Great article by Michelle. I agree with her that I hate patient engagement. I love engaging patients, but I think that meaningful use requirements have forever corrupted the term patient engagement. We better move on to a new term, because I assure you that what’s happening with meaningful use is not engaging patients.


This is a little self serving, but Wednesday (5/6/15) I’ll be doing a webinar on the topic of practice marketing. I’m going to cover quite a bit of ground from a high quality practice website, to search engine optimization (SEO), reputation management, and meaningful patient engagement (sorry I had to use the term after my last comment). I hope many of you will attend and then let me know what you thought of it.

The Power of Twitter Chats – Community

Posted on April 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve long been a fan of Twitter chats. There’s something great about a group of people coming together regularly to discuss a certain topic. The discussion can be really interesting and insightful. Many people will follow a Twitter chat and learn about a topic they are learning about, but not participate. However, the biggest value for me from participating in Twitter chats is the relationships that are built during the chat.

Mandi Bishop tweeted something at said at HIMSS15:

Considering it’s been retweeted and favorited like crazy, the message has really resonated on social media. Twitter chats are the perfect opportunity to interact with other humans. It’s the quintessential act of being human. Yes, that means that some people will fight over a topic, some people will have good behavior, some people will have bad behavior, some people will go off topic and start talking about hoping on a boat for a vacation, etc. While not all of these things are favorable, it gives a great glimpse into the humanity of a Twitter account. That bonds people in some of the same ways that bonding with someone in person can do.

What comes from all of these human connections is the growth of a community of people interested in a similar topic area. Notice that I said they were interested in a certain topic area and not necessarily that it was a monolithic group of people with the same interests. In fact, every Twitter chat I’ve been in has an amazingly diverse group of participants. No one really knows if you have 10 followers or 33,000 followers. They judge you on the content of your tweet and not your follower count in a Twitter chat.

I’ve seen this first hand as I’ve put together the #HITMC (Healthcare IT Marketing Community) chats. The community that’s come together around these chats has been phenomenal. I think we might have gone a little fast for the community hosting the chat every other week, but we’ll remedy that soon when we move to a monthly #HITMC chat. Regardless, it’s been a fantastic way to bring together the healthcare IT marketing and PR community. It’s become sort of a rallying space for people to share their ideas, learn from their colleagues, and meet new and interesting people. That’s powerful.

I’ve seen the same thing happen in participation in the #KareoChat and #InfoTalk Twitter chats. A community really comes together in a well hosted Twitter chat. One part education and one part meeting really smart people.

I’m not suggesting that Twitter chats are the solution to all your marketing challenges. In fact, in some places, it might not be the answer. However, I’m always amazed at the power of a great Twitter chat to bring together a community of people around an important topic.

Of course, if you don’t have the energy or reach to start your own Twitter chat, you can always piggy back other popular Twitter chats: #HITsm, #hcsm, or #hcldr to name a few.

HIMSS15 Social Media and Influencer Thoughts

Posted on April 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I think this has been the case the past couple years. The Tuesday of HIMSS seems to always be my day of social media. This year was no different. This was highlighted by a meetup that Shahid Shah and myself did at the HIMSS spot. At first I wasn’t sure if anyone would show for the event. Luckily, 1-2 people were there early and so at least we wouldn’t be talking to ourselves. In fact, Shahid asked for those that weren’t there for the meetup to free up the seats for those that were there for it. Luckily, when I wasn’t watching a whole bunch of people showed up and the event was standing room only. I guess Shahid can really draw a crowd.

What was impressive was the mix of the audience. There was a large group of some of the most influential people in social media (I won’t name names since there were too many and I’ll forget someone), along with a number of newer people. I love that mix and particularly love the new people that are still finding their way. Sometimes they seem a bit like dear in the headlights. That’s ok. That’s part of the fun of learning.

What’s clear to me is that social influencing as really matured for many people, but there are still a lot of people that are trying to figure it out. It’s amazing to see the difference. I’ll be interested to watch this evolve. I still see so much opportunity with it and many aren’t taking advantage of it.

Then, my night was capped off with the New Media Meetup at HIMSS15. This is the 6th year I’ve hosted this event and it seems to get better each year. I’m always humbled by the list of people that register to attend. Plus, I’m extremely appreciative of Stericycle and Patient Prompt that basically through a big party for all these amazing people. It’s always amazing to see the broad spectrum of people that attend and how down to earth they are even given many of their significant social influence. Plus, what an amazing preview for the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference.

I didn’t go into many details on what was at the session or who attending the New Media Meetup, but you can get a lot of that information by checking out the #HITMC hashtag. Thanks to all of my new and old social media friends that made today special. I keep learning from you.

I’ll leave this with just one insight that really hit home to me when I shared it in the meetup. Really caring about the people you’re connecting with, the topics you’re sharing and the work you’re doing really comes through in social media. If you’re faking it, people will usually see that. Plus, really caring about those you connect with on social media and the things you share will change your life in really amazing ways.

Reminds me of the wrestler, Jessie Ventura who became governor of Minnesota. One time I heard him say he didn’t have to have a good memory, because he always said what he thought and never told things that were half true. On social media, if you’re faking it, it makes it hard to remember all the things you’ve faked. If you’re authentic and real, it makes it so much easier.

A Few Quick HIMSS15 Thoughts

Posted on April 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today’s been a long day packed with meetings at HIMSS 2015. I need to reach out to HIMSS to get the final numbers, but word is that there are over 40,000 people at the show. In the hallways, the exhibit hall and the taxi lines it definitely seems to be the case. I’m not sure the jump in attendees, but I saw one tweet that IBM had 400 people there. Don’t quote me on it since I can’t find the tweet, but that’s just extraordinary to even consider that many people from one company.

Of course, the reason I can’t find the tweet is that the Twitter stream has been setting new records each day. The HIMSS 2015 Twitter Tips and Tricks is valuable if you want to get value out of the #HIMSS15 Twitter stream. I also have to admit that I might be going a bit overboard on the selfies. I think I’ve got the @mandibpro selfie disease. Not sure the treatment for it since my doctor doesn’t do a telemedicine visit while I’m in Chicago.

I’ve had some amazing meetings that will inform my blog posts for weeks to come. However, my biggest takeaway from the first official day of HIMSS is that change is in the air. The forces are at work to make interoperability a reality. It’s going to be a massive civil war as the various competing parties battle it out as they set the pathway forward.

You might think that this is a bit of an exaggeration, but I think it’s pretty close to what’s happening. What’s not clear to me is whose going to win and what the final outcome will look like. There are so many competing interests that are trying to get at the data and make it valuable for the doctor and health system.

Along those lines, I’m absolutely fascinated by the real time analytics capabilities that I saw being built. A number of companies I talked to are moving beyond the standard batch loaded enterprise data warehouse approach to a real time (or as one vendor said…we all have to call it near real time) stream of data. I think this is going to drive a massive change in innovation.

I’ll be talking more about the various vendors I saw and their approaches to this in future posts after HIMSS. While I’m excited by some of the many things these companies are doing, I still feel like many of them are constrained by their inability to get to the data. A number of them were working on such small data sets. This was largely because they can’t get the other data. One vendor told me that their biggest challenge is getting an organization to turn over their data for them for analysis.

While it’s important that organizations are extremely careful with how they handle and share their data. More organizations should be working with trusted partners in order to extract more value out of the data and to more importantly make new discoveries. The discoveries we’re making today are really great, but I can only imagine how much more we could accomplish with more data to inform those discoveries.