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Is It Time To Redefine Interoperability?

Posted on October 26, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Recently, an article appearing in healthcare journal HealthAffairs argued that hospitals’ progress toward interoperability has been modest to date. The article, which looked at the extent to which hospitals found, sent, received and integrated information from outside providers in 2015, found that they’d made few gains across all four categories.

Researchers found that the percent of hospitals engaging in all four activities rose to 29.7% that year, up from 24.5% in 2014. The two activities that grew the most in frequency were sending (growing 8.1%) and receiving (8.4%). Despite this expansion, only 18.7% of hospitals reported that they used this data often. The extent to which hospitals integrated the information they received didn’t change from 2014 to 2015.

Interesting, isn’t it, how these stats fail to align with what we know of hospitals’ priorities?  Not only did the rate hospitals sent and received data increase slowly between those two years, hospitals don’t seem to be making any advances in integrating (and presumably, using) shared data. This doesn’t make sense given hospitals’ intense efforts to make interoperability happen.

The question is, are hospitals still limping along in their efforts, or are we failing to measure their progress effectively? For years now, looking at the extent to which they sent/received/found/integrated data has been the accepted yardstick most quarters. To my knowledge, though, those metrics haven’t been validated by formal research as being the best way to define and capture levels of interoperability.

Yes, hospital health data interoperability may be moving as slowly as the HealthAffairs article suggests. After all, I hardly have to tell readers like you how difficult it has been to foster interoperability in any form, and how challenging it has been to achieve any kind of consensus on data staring standards. If someone tells progress toward health data exchange between hospitals hasn’t reached robust levels yet, it probably won’t surprise you in the least.

Still, before we draw the sweeping conclusions about something as important as interoperability, it probably wouldn’t hurt to double-check that we’re asking the right questions.

For example, is the extent to which providers send data to outside organizations as important as the extent to which they receive such data?  I know, in theory, that health data exchanges would be just that, a back and forth between parties on both sides. Certainly, such arrangements are probably better for the industry as a whole long term. But does that mean we should discount the importance of one side or the other of the process?

Perhaps more importantly, at least in my book, is the degree to which hospitals integrate the data into their own systems a good proxy for measuring who’s making interoperability progress? And should be assumed that if they integrate the data, they’re likely to use it to improve outcomes or streamline care?

Don’t misunderstand me, I’m not suggesting that the existing metrics are useless. However, it would be nice to know whether they actually measure what we want them to measure. We need to validate our tools if we want use them to make important judgments about care delivery. Otherwise, why bother with measurements in the first place?

Aggregating the Patient Perspective and Incorporating It Into Software to Change Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 24, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/27 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by CP Nerve Center (@Cpnervecenter), Lisa Davis Budzinski (@lisadbudzinski), and Becky Brandt, RN (@bbhomebody) on the topic of “Aggregating the Patient Perspective and Incorporating It Into Software to Change Healthcare.”

“Fragmented Care” is costly and common

The term “feed forward” refers to designing an information system to collect patient data in real time as care is delivered. Data collection occurs from the first visit, and moves with the patient.

*If we cannot understand patients within our systems of care, how are we going to improve? Perhaps these problems can be overcome by designing data-rich, patient-centric, feed-forward information environments with real-time feedback using a novel approach that is described below.

*The objective is to turn an individual’s data into useful information that can guide intelligent action and to aggregate this patient-level information to show quantifiable results within the clinical microsystem, the healthcare macrosystem, and the community.

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: What extra data should be collected @ appts, to improve outcomes, patient satisfaction & help future patients? #hitsm

T2: Share an example of how Feed-Forward clinical data sytms have helped or harmed you as a pt, Or in caring for a patient. #hitsm

T3: What incentives could be used to create & improve patient centric clinical data systems? How do we connect more facilities? #hitsm

T4: Would patient satisfaction outcomes improve if patients carried full EHR on a thumb drive (etc), to share & update at the end of each visit? #hitsm

T5: Does your Doctor ask for your perspective about your plan of care or how your care is going? And about your satisfaction? #hitsm

BONUS: Is patient-centric care occurring at your medical facility? Are you asked your opinion? #hitsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
11/3 – Patient Burnout
Hosted by the Erin Gilmer (@GilmerHealthLaw)

11/10 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

11/17 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

11/24 – Thanksgiving Break!

12/1 – Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout
Hosted by Gabe Charbonneau, MD (@gabrieldane)

12/8 – TBD
Hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from @MyOpenNotes)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Health IT Continues To Drive Healthcare Leaders’ Agenda

Posted on October 23, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new study laying out opportunities, challenges and issues in healthcare likely to emerge in 2018 demonstrates that health IT is very much top of mind for healthcare leaders.

The 2018 HCEG Top 10 list, which is published by the Healthcare Executive Group, was created based on feedback from executives at its 2017 Annual Forum in Nashville, TN. Participants included health plans, health systems and provider organizations.

The top item on the list was “Clinical and Data Analytics,” which the list describes as leveraging big data with clinical evidence to segment populations, manage health and drive decisions. The second-place slot was occupied by “Population Health Services Organizations,” which, it says, operationalize population health strategy and chronic care management, drive clinical innovation and integrate social determinants of health.

The list also included “Harnessing Mobile Health Technology,” which included improving disease management and member engagement in data collection/distribution; “The Engaged Digital Consumer,” which by its definition includes HSAs, member/patient portals and health and wellness education materials; and cybersecurity.

Other hot issues named by the group include value-based payments, cost transparency, total consumer health, healthcare reform and addressing pharmacy costs.

So, readers, do you agree with HCEG’s priorities? Has the list left off any important topics?

In my case, I’d probably add a few items to list. For example, I may be getting ahead of the industry, but I’d argue that healthcare AI-related technologies might belong there. While there’s a whole separate article to be written here, in short, I believe that both AI-driven data analytics and consumer-facing technologies like medical chatbots have tremendous potential.

Also, I was surprised to see that care coordination improvements didn’t top respondents’ list of concerns. Admittedly, some of the list items might involve taking coordination to the next level, but the executives apparently didn’t identify it as a top priority.

Finally, as unsexy as the topic is for most, I would have thought that some form of health IT infrastructure spending or broader IT investment concerns might rise to the top of this list. Even if these executives didn’t discuss it, my sense from looking at multiple information sources is that providers are, and will continue to be, hard-pressed to allocate enough funds for IT.

Of course, if the executives involved can address even a few of their existing top 10 items next year, they’ll be doing pretty well. For example, we all know that providers‘ ability to manage value-based contracting is minimal in many cases, so making progress would be worthwhile. Participants like hospitals and clinics still need time to get their act together on value-based care, and many are unlikely to be on top of things by 2018.

There are also problems, like population health management, which involve processes rather than a destination. Providers will be struggling to address it well beyond 2018. That being said, it’d be great if healthcare execs could improve their results next year.

Nit-picking aside, HCEG’s Top 10 list is largely dead-on. The question is whether will be able to step up and address all of these things. Fingers crossed!

HIT for HIEs

Posted on October 17, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Mike O’Neill, CEO at MedicaSoft. This is the third blog in a three-part sponsored blog post series focused on new HIT for integration. Each month, a different MedicaSoft expert will share insights on new and innovative technology and its applications in healthcare.

Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) have been in the news lately, and for good reason. With major hurricanes devastating Texas, Florida, the British Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico, accessibility of patient health information rapidly became a major concern. Electronic Health Record adoption has led to most patient data being in electronic form, but it hasn’t necessarily made that data available when and where care is delivered. HIEs can help make that data available; during the recent storms two HIEs were able to spring to action to help clinicians provide care for patients. The ability of the Houston and San Antonio-area HIEs (Greater Houston Healthconnect (GHHC) and Healthcare Access San Antonio (HASA) to exchange information allowed patient records to be accessed remotely – which was absolutely critical during this natural disaster.

If you were on the fence about “the cloud,” this is the perfect case study in its effectiveness. More than ever, HIEs are called upon to assist by making health records available during critical care encounters. HIEs need modern technology to best serve their communities in these instances, going beyond basic connectivity and interoperability to deliver tangible value using the wealth of data they collect –

  1. Organize the data into meaningful health records. HIEs often have access to years of raw data. They may need help organizing it into a clinical data repository, matching patients, and providing a health record that is clinically useful. This is one way we assist HIEs in using the data they’ve collected.
  2. Provide valuable alerts & notifications. These are useful, especially in a crisis, to locate patients, but they can also give patients notice on events they need to follow-up on. This is another layer we build onto HIEs’ data foundation.

Health records that are useful go a long way – beyond individual hospitals, and regions and state lines. To be useful, health records must go where the patients go, wherever that may be.

An emerging approach to meet this need is the Strategic Health Information Exchange Collaborative (SHIEC’s) Patient-Centered Data Home (PCDH) concept among HIEs. PCDH helps providers access real-time health information across regional and state lines, wherever the patient is seeking care. Regardless of where the clinical data originates, it becomes part of the patient’s longitudinal patient record – the PCDH – giving patients control of their data.

About Mike O’Neill
Mike is the CEO at MedicaSoft. He came to MedicaSoft from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) where he was a Senior Advisor and member of the founding team of the VA Center for Innovation. Mike serves as the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Open Source Electronic Health Record Alliance (OSEHRA). Prior to VA, Mike was involved in the commercialization of new products and technology in startups and large companies. He is a die-hard Virginia Tech Hokie.  

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Where Patient Communications Fall Short?

Posted on October 12, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sarah Bennight, Marketing Strategist for Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

We are constantly switching devices to engage in our daily lives. In fact, in the last ten minutes I have searched a website on my desktop computer, answered a phone call, and checked several text messages and emails on my cellphone. Our ability to seamlessly jump from one device to the next affects our consumer behavior when interacting with places of business.

Today, we can order coffee and groceries online, web chat with our internet service company, and research store offerings before ever physically walking into a building. Traditionally, healthcare consumers had mainly phone support until the 2014 Meaningful Use 2 rule dictated messaging with a physician and patient portal availability. Recently, online scheduling and urgent care check in has been an attractive offering for consumers of health wanting to take control of their calendars and wait times.

Healthcare is certainly expanding functionality and communication channels to meet consumer demand. But where are we falling short? The answer may be relatively simple: data integration. Much like the clinical side of the healthcare business, integration is a gap we must solve. The key to turning technological convenience into optimal experience is evolving multichannel patient interactions into omnichannel support.

Omnichannel means providing a seamless experience regardless of channel or device. In the healthcare contact center, this means ensuring live agents, scheduling apps, chat bots, messaging apps, and all other interaction points share data across channels. It removes the individual information silos surrounding the patient journey, and connects them into one view from patient awareness to care selection, and again when additional care is needed.

In 2016, Cisco Connect cited four key reasons a business should invest in omnichannel consumer experiences, but I believe this resonates in the healthcare world as well:

  1. A differentiated patient and caregiver experience which is personal and interactive. Each care journey is unique, and their initial experiences should resonate and instill confidence in your brand. We now communicate with several generations who have different levels of comfort with technology and online resources. Offering multiple channels of interaction is crucial to success in the competitive healthcare space. But don’t stop there! Integrated channels connecting the data points along the journey into and beyond the walls of the care facility will create lasting loyalty.
  2. Increased profit and revenue. The journey to finding a doctor or care facility begins long before a patient walks in your door. Most of these journeys begin online, by interviewing friends, and checking online reviews. Once an initial decision is made to visit your organization, you can extend your marketing budget by targeting patients who might actually be interested in your services. When you know what your patients’ needs are, there is a greater focus and a higher chance of conversion.
  3. Maintain and contain operating costs. Integrating with EMRs is not always the easiest task. However, your scheduling and reminder platforms must be able talk to each other not only for the optimal experience, but also for efficient internal process management. For example, if a patient receives a text reminder about an appointment and realizes the timing won’t work, they can request to reschedule via text. Real time communication with the EMR enables agents currently on the phone with other patients to see the original appointment open up and grab the slot. Imagine the streamlining with the patient as well in an integrated platform. Go beyond the ‘request to reschedule’ return text and send a message says “We see that you want to reschedule your appointment. Here are some alternative times available”. Take it one step further with a one-step click to schedule process. With this capability, the patient could immediately book without a follow-up phone call reminder or staff having to hunt them down to book.
  4. Faster time to serve the patient. When systems and people communicate pertinent data, faster issue resolution is possible. Healthcare can be scary, and when you address patient and caregiver needs in a timely manner, trust in your organization will grow. In omnichannel experiences, a patient can search for care in the middle of the night online, and when they don’t find an appointment opening a call could be made. Imagine the value of already knowing that a patient was searching for a sick visit for tomorrow morning with Dr. X. With this data in mind, you are able to immediately offer alternatives and keep that patient in your system before they turn to a more convenient option.

You can see how omnichannel experiences are going to pave the way for the future of the contact center. Right now, the interactions with patients before and after treatment provide an enormous opportunity to build trust and further engagement with your organization. By integrating the data and allowing cross-channel experiences that build on each other, the contact center will extend into the main hub of engagement in the future. The time to build that integrated infrastructure is now, because in the near future new channels of engagement will be added and expected. Are you ready to deliver an omnichannel experience?

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality call center & telephone answering servicespatient access services and automated communication technology. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

Moving from “Reporting on” to “Leading” Healthcare – A Conversation with Dr. Halee Fischer-Wright, President & CEO of MGMA

Posted on October 11, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

In Chapter 3 of Dr. Halee Fischer-Wright’s new book Back to Balance, she writes: “People are increasingly being treated as if they are the same. Science and data are being used to decrease variability in an attempt to get doctors to treat patients in predictable ways.” This statement is Fischer-Wright’s way of saying that the current focus on standardization of healthcare processes in the quest to reduce costs and increase quality may not be the brass ring we should be striving for. She believes that a balance is needed between healthcare standardization and the fact that each patient is a unique individual.

As president of the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), a role Fischer-Wright has held since 2015, she is uniquely positioned to see first-hand the impact standardization (from both legislative and technological forces) has had on the medical profession. With over 40,000 members, MGMA represents many of America’s physician practices – a group particularly hard hit over the past few years by the technology compliance requirements of Meaningful Use and changes to reimbursements.

For many physician practices Meaningful Use has turned out to be more of a compliance program rather than an incentive program. To meet the program’s requirements, physicians have had to alter their workflows and documentation approaches. Complying with the program and satisfying the reporting requirements became the focus, which Fischer-Wright believes is a terrible unintended consequence.

“We have been so focused on standardizing the way doctors work that we have taken our eyes off the real goal,” said Fischer-Wright in and interview with HealthcareScene. “As physicians our focus needs to be on patient outcomes not whether we documented the encounter in a certain way. In our drive to mass standardization, we are in danger of ingraining the false belief that populations of patients behave in the same way and can be treated through a single standardized treatment regimen. That’s simply not the case. Patients are unique.”

Achieving a balance in healthcare will not be easy – a sentiment that permeates Back to Balance, but Fischer-Wright is certain that healthcare technology will play a key role: “We need HealthIT companies to stop focusing just on what can be done and start working on enabling what needs to be done. Physicians want to leverage technology to deliver better care to patient at a lower cost, but not at the expense of the patient/physician relationship. Let’s stop building tools that force doctors to stare at the computer screen instead of making eye contact with their patients.”

To that end, Fischer-Wright issued a friendly challenge to the vendors in the MGMA17 exhibit hall: “Create products and services that physicians actually enjoy using. Help reduce barriers between physician, patients and between healthcare organizations. Empower care don’t detract from it.”

She went on to say that MGMA itself will be stepping up to help champion the cause of better HealthIT for patients AND physicians. In fact, Fischer-Wright was excited to talk about the new direction for MGMA as an organization. For most of its history, MGMA has reported on the healthcare industry from a physician practice perspective. Over the past year with the help of a supportive Board of Directors and active members, the MGMA leadership team has begun to shift the organization to a more prominent leadership role.

“We are going to take a much more active role in healthcare. We are going to focus on fixing healthcare from the ground up –  from providers & patients upwards. In the next few years MGMA will be much bigger, much strong and even more relevant to physician practices. We are forging partnerships with other key players in healthcare, federal/state/local governments and other associations/societies.“

Members should expect more conferences, more educational opportunities and more publications on a more frequent basis from MGMA going forward. Fischer-Wright also hinted at several new technology-related offerings but opted not to provide details. Looking at the latest news from MGMA on their revamped data-gathering/analytics, however, it would not be surprising if their new offerings were data related. MGMA is one of the few organizations that regularly collects information on and provides context on the state of physician practices in the US.

It will be exciting to watch MGMA evolve in the years ahead.

Role of Provider Engagement for Improving Data Accuracy – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/13 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by @CAQH on the topic of “Role of Provider Engagement for Improving Data Accuracy.”

Healthcare provider data forms the foundation of many important processes in the nation’s healthcare system, whether referring a patient to a specialist, paying insurance claims, credentialing providers or maintaining accurate provider directories. Yet access to accurate, timely provider data has remained elusive.

A lack of authoritative and reliable sources has resulted in a costly, piecemeal approach to acquiring and maintaining provider information. The commercial healthcare industry spends at least $2.1 billion annually on inefficient processes to maintain the data, according to a recent CAQH white paper.

While healthcare providers are important contributors of their professional and practice information, the task of submitting frequent updates to different organizations, through different channels, has created a significant administrative challenge.

Join @CAQH in a discussion about the role of provider engagement in improving data accuracy. Topics will cover strategies for collaboration and enhanced communication to ease the burdens on providers and users of provider data.

Reference Materials:

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: Stakeholders define provider data differently. How do you use provider data & in what role, i.e. payer, provider, consumer? #hitsm

T2: How does the shifting definition of “provider” (e.g. emerging provider types) impact data management? #hitsm

T3: How can the industry empower providers to participate more actively in data accuracy? #hitsm

T4: What can industry stakeholders do to reduce the administrative burden on providers? #hitsm

T5: What strategies would help providers and payers hold each other accountable for high-quality provider data? #hitsm

BONUS: What is the biggest opportunity you see for improving the quality of provider data right now? #hitsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/20 – Community Sharing Chat
Hosted by the #HITsm Community

10/27 – Aggregating the Patient Perspective and Incorporating It Into Software to Change Healthcare
Hosted by Lisa Davis Budzinski (@lisadbudzinski)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

MGMA17 Day 1 – Drawing Inspiration from Consumer Experience

Posted on October 9, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Last night, attendees celebrated the opening of the Medical Group Management Association’s annual conference (MGMA17) in Anaheim CA with a block party that featured local food trucks instead of traditional food-stations. This welcome twist allowed attendees to sample small portions from several vendors.

The block party was a reflection of the exhibitor reception that happened earlier in the evening. With just 90 minutes, attendees could only sample a small portion of the 300 vendors that filled two halls in the Anaheim Convention Center. Despite that short amount of time, a key theme emerged – consumer experiences are serving as inspiration for HealthIT companies.

Ken Comée, CEO of CareCloud, summed it up this way: “Patients have high expectations from their healthcare providers now. They want the same level of service and convenience that they get from Amazon, Uber, OpenTable and banks.”

Prominently featured in the CareCloud booth was Breeze – a recently announced platform developed in partnership with First Data (see this blog post for more details). Comée had this to say about their new platform “If I had to compare Breeze to a consumer experience, I would have to say that it is most similar to checking in for a flight. Very few people check in for their flight in-person at the airport anymore. Almost everyone checks in at home on their computer or via their phone well ahead of their flight. You fill in all the relevant information online and you just show up to the airport and go where you need to go. There’s no paperwork you have to fill out, no need to arrive early…it’s just a smooth seamless experience. Armed with Breeze, our clients can now offer that same airline check-in experience with new as well as returning patients.”

A few booths over, David Rodriguez founder of NextPatient, talked about how OpenTable was one of the inspirations for their online appointment-booking platform. “In today’s world, when a person arrives at the website of a restaurant, they want to be able to see the times when they can make a reservation and they want to be able to click the time they want, fill in no more than 2 or 3 key pieces of information and lock it in. That’s what we offer physician practices – an elegant way to allow patients to click and book an appointment right from the practice’s own website without complex coding.”

Calibrater Health, a company that texts surveys to patients after a visit and creates “tickets” for any responses with a low NPS, was inspired by ZenDesk. Though not technically a consumer-facing application, ZenDesk does help companies forge and manage relationships with end-users by streamlining customer-service workflows, something Calibrater brings to its clients.

Patient engagement vendor, Relatient, drew inspiration from salon experiences. For many years it has been common practice in the salon and spa industries to send customers friendly reminders of their upcoming appointments via voice, text and email. Not only did these reminders reduce no-shows, but they also helped to improve customer loyalty. The Relatient solution brings those same benefits to healthcare organizations.

The night’s most thoughtful story of consumer inspiration came from Aaron Glauser, Senior Director of Product Marketing at AdvancedMD. “If I had to pick a consumer experience that inspires me and that we are closest to, it’d have to be Amazon. When you search Amazon for a product, a lot of matching entries come up – just like searching online for a doctor. You then narrow the search by looking at the star ratings and the reviews. Once you decide on a product, you click in and you decide how, when and where you want it delivered. That’s how patients want to book appointments. With AdvancedMD they can choose an open appointment time and they can even opt for a telemedicine appointment. That’s analogous to whether I want the physical book or the Kindle version on Amazon. Then as a user I get to choose how I want to pay for my Amazon purchase – which we can offer through AdvancedMD.”

Whether its Amazon, Zendesk, OpenTable, a salon or an airline that has served as inspiration. What was made clear on Day 1 of MGMA17’s exhibit hall is that consumer-experiences have become an important factor in the design of HealthIT solutions…and healthcare will be better for it.

New Service Brings RCM Process To Blockchain

Posted on October 6, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Much of the discussion around blockchain (that I’ve seen, at least) focuses on blockchain’s potential as a platform for secure sharing of clinical data. For example, some HIT experts see blockchain as a near-ideal scalable platform for protecting the privacy of EHR-based patient data.

That being said, blockchain offers an even more logical platform for financial transactions, given its origins as the foundation for bitcoin transactions and its track record of supporting those transactions efficiently.

Apparently, that hasn’t been lost on the team at Change Healthcare. The Nashville-based health IT company is planning to launch what it says is the first blockchain solution for enterprise-scale use in healthcare. According to a release announcing the launch, the new technology platform should be online by the end of this year.

Change Healthcare already processes 12 billion transactions a year, worth more than $2 trillion in claims annually.  Not surprisingly, the new platform will extend its new blockchain platform to its existing payer and provider partners. Here’s an infographic explaining how Change expects processes will shift when it deploys blockchain:

Change_Healthcare_Intelligent_Healthcare_Network_Workflow_Infographic

To build out blockchain for use in RCM, Change is working with customers, as well as organizations like The Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger project.

Hyperledger encompasses a range of tools set to offer new, more-standardized approaches to deploying blockchain, including Hyperledger Cello, which will offer access to on-demand “as-a-service” blockchain technology and Hyperledger Composer, a tool for building blockchain business networks and boosting the development and deployment of smart contracts.

It’s hard to tell how much impact Change’s blockchain deployment will have. Certainly, there are countless ways in which RCM can be improved, given the extent to which dollars still leak out of the system. Also, given its existing RCM network, Change has as good a chance as anyone of building out blockchain-based RCM.

Still, I’m wondering whether the new service will prove to be a long-term product deployment or an experiment (though Change would doubtless argue for the former). Not only that, given its relatively immature status and the lack of broadly-accepted standards, is it really safe for providers to rely on blockchain for something as mission-critical as cash flow?

Of course, when it comes to new technologies, somebody has to be first, and I’m certainly not suggesting that Change doesn’t know what it’s doing. I’d just like more evidence that blockchain is ready for prime time.