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Kill Passwords

Posted on January 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One time I was attending the crazy SXSW conference in Austin. As part of the event, there was a startup company from Las Vegas (where I live) that had a small tower in the big Vegas Tech booth. Their startup was a method to use your phone as your password and a few other password related things. I’m not sure how they came up with this idea, but half way through the conference they switched their monitor which previously had their logo on it to just say “Kill Passwords” in big black letters with a white background. It was amazing how much traffic they drove to their small table because of that simple digital signage.

While this is a story in marketing that’s worthy of the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference which I host, it also illustrated how much we hate passwords. Turns out that this is a universal truth, but it’s particularly poignant in healthcare because of absurd password policies that many healthcare organizations put in place in the name of security (even if many of the choices they make don’t actually improve security).

Doctors password frustration was illustrated well in the latest ZDoggMD video “Doc Vader on The Password Menace.” Check it out below:

I felt it was appropriate to use ZDoggMD’s latest video in today’s Fun Friday post, but I do it with some sadness. A couple days ago, ZDoggMD announced that his Turntable Health clinic in Las Vegas was shutting down. As a Vegas resident and former member of Turntable Health, I was sorry to see this happen. No doubt this is not the end for ZDoggMD. In fact, for those that are fans of his video and his message, I think this will give him more time to evangelize and inspire. So, that’s a good thing. Healthcare can use a shakeup that points out the challenges we face with a little lot of humor. Thanks ZDoggMD for all you do.

Now, I agree that passwords are a pain. Although, I think we’ve all learned to deal with them. I do look forward to the day when passwords will no longer exist in their current form. I’m not sure what it will look like, but it will be a welcome day!

8th Annual New Media Meetup at #HIMSS17 Sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions

Posted on January 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

8th Annual New Media Meetup - HIMSS17 in Orlando

For those of you planning to attend the HIMSS 2017 conference in Orlando, I’m excited to share the details of the 8th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS. For those who’ve missed the last 7 events, it’s a unique event that brings together healthcare IT bloggers, tweeters, and other social media influencers at the mecca of Healthcare IT conferences.

It’s incredible to think how far social media, blogging, and other new media formats have changed since we first started the New Media Meetup 8 years ago. What hasn’t changed is how many incredible connections happen on social media and how much fun we have meeting in person at the New Media Meetup during HIMSS. We’re lucky to have Stericycle Communication Solutions supporting our desire to bring together the best healthcare IT influencers at this incredible event. I hope everyone will spend some time checking out Stericycle Communication Solutions and thank them for sponsoring the event.

If you’d like to attend the event, please make sure you register.

Here’s a quick summary of what we have planned for the event:
When: Tuesday 2/21 6:00-8:00 PM
Where: Cuba Libre at Pointe Orlando, 9101 International Dr, Orlando, FL 32819 MAP (Cuba Libre is a short walk from the convention center.)
Who: Anyone who uses or is interested in New Media (Blogs, Twitter, Social Media, YouTube Live, Facebook, etc)
What: Food, Drinks, Dance Floor, Giveaways, and Amazing People

Register Now!

Sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions
SRCL Communication Solutions
Stericycle Communication Solutions helps bring patients and healthcare organizations closer together. We believe that the key to patient engagement and positive patient experiences is effective and timely communication. Stericycle Communication Solutions is a leading provider of live agent services and technology solutions including high quality telephone answering, online appointment scheduling, and automated communication services; allowing patients and providers to interact through multiple communication channels such as phone, email, voice, text and online.

Learn more at: www.stericyclecommunications.com

Those interested in the New Media Meetup at HIMSS will want to check out the full scale Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference that we’re hosting in Las Vegas April 5-7, 2017. It’s a special 3 days devoted to health IT marketing and PR professionals.

A really big thank you also goes out to all the members of Influential Networks and Healthcare Scene that help promote the New Media Meetup. This event was originally brought together through social media and is still largely organized thanks to social media.

Let me know if you have any questions and I look forward to seeing many of you in Orlando very soon!

The “Disconnects” That Threaten The Connected World

Posted on January 11, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I’m betting that most readers are intimately familiar with the connected health world. I’m also pretty confident that you’re pretty excited about its potential – after all, who wouldn’t be?  But from what I’ve seen, the health IT world has paid too little attention to problems that could arise in building out a connected health infrastructure. That’s what makes a recent blog post on connected health problems so interesting.

Phil Baumann, an RN and digital strategist at Telerx, writes that while the concept of connecting things is useful, there’s a virtually endless list of “disconnects” that could lead to problems with connected health. Some examples he cites include:

  • The disconnect between IoT hardware and software
  • The disconnect between IoT software and patches (which, he notes, might not even exist)
  • The disconnect between the Internet’s original purpose and the fast-evolving purposes created in the Connected World
  • The disconnects among communication protocols
  • The disconnect between influencers and reality (which he says is “painfully wide”)
  • The disconnects among IoT manufacturers
  • The disconnects among supply chains and vendors

According to Baumann, businesses that use IoT devices and other connected health technologies may be diving in too quickly, without taking enough time to consider the implications of their decisions. He writes:

Idea generation and deployment of IoT are tasks with enormous ethical, moral, economic, security, health and safety responsibilities. But without considering – deeply, diligently – the disconnects, then the Connected World will be nothing of the sort. It will be a nightmare without morning.

In his piece, Baumann stuck to general tech issues rather than pointing a finger at the healthcare industry specifically. But I’d argue that the points he makes are important for health IT leaders to consider.

For example, it’s interesting to think about vulnerable IoT devices posing a mission-critical security threat to healthcare organizations. To date, as Baumann rightly notes, manufacturers have often fallen way behind in issuing software updates and security patches, leaving patient data exposed. Various organizations – such as the FDA – are attempting to address medical device cybersecurity, but these issues won’t be addressed quickly.

Another item on his disconnect list – that connected health deployment goes far beyond the original design of the Internet – also strikes me as particularly worth taking to heart. While past networking innovations (say, Ethernet) have led to rapid change, the changes brought on by the IoT are sprawling and almost unmanageable under current conditions. We’re seeing chaotic rather than incremental or even disruptive change. And given that we’re dealing with patient lives, rather than, for example, sensors tracking packages, this is a potentially dangerous problem.

I’m not at all suggesting that healthcare leaders should pull the plug on connected health innovations. It seems clear that the benefits that derive from such approaches will outweigh the risks, especially over time. But it does seem like a good idea to stop and think about those risks more carefully.

New Year’s Goals for Healthcare IT – #HITsm Chat Topics

Posted on January 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/13 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from @HealthcareScene on the topic of “New Year’s Goals for Healthcare IT“. Should be a great time looking at the healthcare IT industry and evaluating what goals might help move the industry forward. Plus, we’ll talk about personal goals we can make in our own life and as an #HITsm community to make healthcare IT better as well.

Here’s the full list of questions that will serve as the framework for the #HITsm chat on New Year’s Goals for Healthcare IT:

T1: What big, hairy, audacious, goals (BHAG) should healthcare IT strive to accomplish? #HITsm

T2: What small, reasonable goals could healthcare IT achieve in 2017 that would make a big difference? #HITsm

T3: Which organizations can have the most impact on health IT and what goals should they strive for? #HITsm

T4: As an #HITsm community, what goals should we strive to achieve in 2017?

T5: Personally, what do you commit to do in 2017 to move healthcare IT forward? #HITsm

Bonus: What’s your prediction on what will really happen in healthcare IT in 2017? #HITsm

Here’s a look at the upcoming #HITsm chat schedule:

1/20 – Identifying, Engaging, and Learning from Health IT Influencers, Leaders & Organizations
Hosted by Juliana Ruiz from Bryte Box Consulting (@BryteBox)

1/27 – Key Components of Health IT Strategy and Disaster Recovery
Hosted by Bill Esslinger (@billesslinger) from @FogoDataCenters

2/3 – Makers
Hosted by MrRimp (with assistance from @wareflo)

2/10 – TBD
Hosted by Steve Sisko (@shimcode)

2/17 – TBD
Hosted by Burt Rosen (@burtrosen) from @healthsparq

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you have ideas for how to make #HITsm better.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

FDA Weighs In On Medical Device Cybersecurity

Posted on January 5, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

In the past, medical devices lived in a separate world from standard health IT infrastructure, typically housed in a completely separate department. But today, of course, medical device management has become much more of an issue for health IT managers, given the extent to which such devices are being connected to the Internet and exposed to security breaches.

This has not been lost on the FDA, which has been looking at medical device security problems for a long time. And now – some would say “at long last” – the FDA has released final guidance on managing medical device cybersecurity. This follows the release of earlier final guidance on the subject released in October 2014.

While the FDA’s advice is aimed at device manufactures, rather than the health IT managers who read this blog, I think it’s good for HIT leaders to review. (After all, you still end up managing the end product!)

In the guidance, the FDA argues that the best way to bake cybersecurity protections into medical devices is for manufacturers to do so from the outset, through the entire product lifecycle:

Manufacturers should build in cybersecurity controls when they design and develop the device to assure proper device performance in the face of cyber threats, and then they should continuously monitor and address cybersecurity concerns once the device is on the market and being used by patients.

Specifically, the agency is recommending that manufacturers take the following steps:

  • Have a way to monitor and detect cybersecurity vulnerabilities in their devices
  • Know assess and detect the level of risk vulnerabilities pose to patient safety
  • Establish a process for working with cybersecurity researchers and other stakeholders to share information about possible vulnerabilities
  • Issue patches promptly, before they can be exploited

The FDA also deems it of “paramount” importance that manufacturers and stakeholders consider applying core NIST principles for improving critical infrastructure cybersecurity.

All of this sounds good. But considering the immensity of the medical device infrastructure – and the rate of its growth – don’t expect these guidelines to make much of an impact on the device cybersecurity problem.

After all, there are an estimated 10 million to 15 million medical devices in US hospitals today, according to health tech consultant Stephen Grimes, who spoke on biomedical device security at HIMSS ’16. Grimes, a past chair of the HIMSS Medical Device Security Task Force, notes that one 500-bed hospital could have 7,500 devices on board, most of which will be networked. And each networked monitor, infusion pump, ventilator, CT or MRI scanner could be vulnerable to attack.

Bottom line, we’re looking at some scary risks regardless of what manufacturers do next. After all, even if they do a much better job of securing their devices going forward, there’s a gigantic number of existing devices which can be hacked. And we haven’t even gotten into the vulnerabilities that can be exploited among home-based connected devices.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m glad to see the FDA stepping in here. But if you look at the big picture, it’s pretty clear that their guidance is clearly just a small step in a very long and complicated process.

MACRA and CMS- #HITsm Chat Topics

Posted on January 4, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/6 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Andy Slavitt (@ASlavitt) and the @CMSGov team (@AislingMcDL, @JessPKahn, @AndreyOstrovsky, @N_Brennan, @LisaBari, and @ThomasNOV) on the topic of “MACRA and CMS“. Should be a lively discussion with Andy Slavitt and the CMS team. Plus, a great time for the healthcare IT community to be able to engage with CMS.

Here’s the full list of questions that will serve as the framework for the #HITsm chat on MACRA and CMS:

T1: How are you planning to participate in MACRA (MIPS/APMs)? Do you have a final plan or are you still figuring it out?

T2: What do you think MACRA’s impact will be on care quality?

T3: MACRA is an opportunity for new payment models, what new models should be incorporated into MACRA?

T4: What new initiatives should be taken on by CMS and what should be left in place and not changed by the new administration?

T5: What’s an effective interaction between the public and CMS? What’s been your experience?

Bonus: What’s your 2017 healthcare IT resolutions?

Here’s a look at the upcoming #HITsm chat schedule:

1/13 – New Years Goals for Healthcare IT
Hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from Healthcare Scene

1/20 – Identifying, Engaging, and Learning from Health IT Influencers, Leaders & Organizations
Hosted by Juliana Ruiz from Bryte Box Consulting (@BryteBox)

1/27 – Key Components of Health IT Strategy and Disaster Recovery
Hosted by Bill Esslinger (@billesslinger) from @FogoDataCenters

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always let us know if you have ideas for how to make #HITsm better.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Patient Engagement Platforms Are 2017’s Sexiest Tech

Posted on January 3, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Over the last few months, I’ve become convinced that the predictable star of 2017 — population health management — isn’t going to be as hot as people think.

Instead, I’d argue that the trend to watch is the emergence of new technologies that guide, reach out to and engage with patients at key moments in their care process. We’re at the start of a period of spectacular growth for patient engagement platforms, with one analyst firm predicting that the global market for these solutions will hit $34.94 billion by 2023.

We all seem to agree already that we need to foster patient engagement if we want to meet population health goals. But until recently, most of the approaches I’ve seen put in place are manual, laborious and resource-intensive. Yes, the patient portal is an exception to that rule – and seems to help patients and clinicians connect – but there’s only so much you can do with a portal interface. We need more powerful, flexible solutions if we hope to make a dent in the patient engagement problem.

In the coming year, I think we’ll see a growing number of providers adopt technology that helps them interact and engage with patients more effectively. I’m talking about initiatives like the rollout of technology by vendor HealthGrid at ColumbiaDoctors, a large multispecialty group affiliated with Columbia University Medical Center, which was announced last month.

While I haven’t used the technology first hand, it seems to offer the right functions, all available via mobile phone. These include pre- and post-visit communications, access to care information and a clinically-based rules engine which drives outreach regarding appointments, educations, medications and screening. That being said, HealthGrid definitely has some powerful competitors coming at the same problem, including the Salesforce.com Health Cloud.

Truth be told, it was probably inevitable that vendors would turn up to automate key patient outreach efforts. After all, unless providers boost their ability to target patients’ individual needs – ideally, without hiring lots of costly human care managers – they aren’t likely to do well under value-based payment schemes. One-off experiments with mobile apps or one-by-one interventions by nurse care coordinators simply don’t scale.

Of course, these technologies are probably pretty expensive right now – as new tech in an emerging market usually is — which will probably slow adoption somewhat. I admit that when I did a Google search on “patient engagement solutions,” I ran into a vendor touting a $399 a month option for doctors, which isn’t too bad if it can actually deliver. But enterprise solutions are likely to be a big investment, and also, call for a good deal of integration work. After all, if nothing else, health systems will want to connect patient engagement software to their back-office systems and EMR, at minimum, which is no joke.

Still, to my mind there’s little question that patient engagement technologies are going to be the sexiest health IT niche to watch in 2017, one which will generate major buzz in healthcare boardrooms across the country. Whether you invest or not, definitely watch this space.

ONC Takes Another Futile Whack At Interoperability

Posted on January 2, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

With the New Year on its way, ONC has issued its latest missive on how to move the healthcare industry towards interoperability. Its Interoperability Standards Advisory for 2017, an update from last year’s version, offers a collection of standards and implementation specs the agency has identified as important to health data sharing.

I want to say at the outset that this seems a bit, well, strange to me. It really does seem like a waste of time to create a book of curated standards when the industry’s interoperability take changes every five minutes. In fact, it seems like an exercise in futility.

But I digress. Let’s talk about this.

About the ISA

The Advisory includes four technical  sections, covering a) vocabulary/code sets/terminology, b) content/structure standards and implementation specs, c) standards and implementation specs for services and d) models and profiles, plus a fifth section listing ONC’s questions and requesting feedback. This year’s version takes the detailed feedback the ONC got on last year’s version into account.

According to ONC leader Vindell Washington, releasing the ISA is an important step toward achieving the goals the agency has set out in the Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap, as well as the Interoperability Pledge announced earlier this year. There’s little doubt, at minimum, that it represents the consensus thinking of some very smart and thoughtful people.

In theory ONC would appear to be steaming ahead toward meeting its interoperability goals. And one can hardly disagree that it’s overarching goal set forth in the Roadmap, of creating a “learning health system” by 2024 sounds attractive and perhaps doable.

Not only that, at first glance it might seem that providers are getting on board. As ONC notes, companies which provide 90% of EHRs used by hospitals nationwide, as well as the top five healthcare systems in the country, have agreed to the Pledge. Its three core requirements are that participants make it easy for consumers to access their health information, refrain from interfering with health data sharing, and implement federally recognized national interoperability standards.

Misplaced confidence

But if you look at the situation more closely, ONC’s confidence seems a bit misplaced. While there’s much more to its efforts, let’s consider the Pledge as an example of how slippery the road ahead is.

So let’s look at element one, consumer access to data. While agreeing to give patients access is a nice sentiment, to me it seems inevitable that there will be as many forms of data access as there are providers. Sure, ONC or other agencies could attempt to regulate this, but it’s like trying to nail down jello given the circumstances. And what’s more, as soon as we define what adequate consumer access is, some new technology, care model or consumer desire will change everything overnight.

What about information blocking? Will those who took the Pledge be able to avoid interfering with data flows? I’d guess that if nothing else, they won’t be able to support the kind of transparency and sharing ONC would like to see. And then when you throw in those who just don’t think full interoperability is in their interests – but want to seem as though they play well with others – you’ve pretty much got a handful o’ nothing.

And consider the third point of the Pledge, which asks providers to implement “federally recognized” standards. OK, maybe the ISA’s curated specs meet this standard, but as the Advisory is considered “non-binding” perhaps they don’t. OK, so what if there were a set of agreed-upon federal standards? Would the feds be able to keep up with changes in the marketplace (and technology) that would quickly make their chosen models obsolete? I doubt it. So we have another swing and a miss.

Given how easy the Pledge is to challenge, how much weight can we assign to efforts like the ISA or even ONC’s long-term interoperability roadmap? I’d argue that the answer is “not much.” The truth is that at least in its current form, there’s little chance the ONC can do much to foster a long-term, structural change in how health organizations share data. It’d be nice to think that, but thinking doesn’t make it so.

Top EMR and HIPAA Blog Posts of 2016

Posted on December 30, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At the end of each year, it’s fun to pull up the stats and see which blog posts were the most popular blog posts and pages on EMR and HIPAA. What’s shocking to me is how many older posts on EMR and HIPAA are still generating a ton of traffic. Here’s a look at the top 10 blog posts and a bit of commentary on each.

1. Healthcare IT and EHR Conferences and Events – This page has gotten 10 times more traffic than pretty much all of the other posts on this list.  I’m biased, but it’s a great resource.  It also illustrates to me that I should spend more time creating these types of deep resources that are useful to readers.  It also illustrates that I traveled too much in 2016, but I’ve enjoyed every moment of those trips.

2. 6 Healthcare Incubators Growing the Future of HealthTech – This post probably needs to be updated with which incubators are still around and new healthcare incubators that have launched.  Might also be interesting to look at how well companies from the various incubators have done since being in the incubator.

3. Benefits of EMR or EHR Over Paper Charts – This was one of the first pages I ever created on EMR and HIPAA.  The sad part is that it looks like I still had plenty left to complete on that page.  However, it still highlights many of the benefits of EMR and EHR.  I’m glad it’s still getting visits since far too often we love to complain about EMR and EHR and take for granted all the benefits that an EHR provides.

4. 10 Ways Many Dental Offices Are Breaching HIPAA – This was a great guest post by Trevor James.  It was targeted at Dental Offices, but most of the items apply to any healthcare organization.  It’s amazing how many people still don’t understand HIPAA and what it requires.

5. Meaningful Use Is Going to Be Replaced – #JPM16 – This announcement was a bit of a surprise when it happened and I’m trying to understand why we didn’t know this was coming.  I also find it quite interesting that Andy Slavitt chose to make this announcement at JP Morgan’s annual healthcare conference and not at HIMSS or some other event.  Maybe it was just timing, but I think that says a lot about the JP Morgan event.

6. 2014 EHR Mandate – One of the top searches that refers traffic to EMR and HIPAA are related to the question of whether there’s an EHR mandate.  That’s likely why this post is so popular even though it was written back in 2011.  It’s amazing how well this content still applies almost 6 years later.  There is no EHR mandate and I don’t think there ever will be.  However, there are forces and reasons to use EHR.

7. Crazy and Funny ICD-10 Codes – These are still funny today.  Although, I’m a bit surprised that the post is still so popular.  It would be interesting to see a report from an EHR vendor or someone on how many of these funny codes actually get used in practice.  My guess is not very many times, but I’m open to being surprised.

8. The Impact of the 2016 Election on Healthcare IT – This was a prediction post.  We’ll need another year or two to see if my predictions were accurate.  I’m still pretty confident in them.

9. Examples of HIPAA Privacy Violations – More HIPAA Lawsuits Coming? – This post is amazing since it was written back in 2006.  That makes it almost 10 years old.  What can I say?  Concern over HIPAA lawsuits is a big deal and people can’t help to look when a wreck (ie. HIPAA violation) happens.

10. Has Electronic Health Record Replacement Failed? – Props to Justin Campbell from Galen Healthcare on this great piece.  I think we’re just at the beginning of the EHR replacement market.  So, I have a feeling this piece and others like it are going to continue in popularity.

11. Don’t Yell FHIR in a Hospital … Yet – I’m a little shocked to find this on the list since it was only posted a month ago. I guess the topic of FHIR is a good one and Richard’s post throwing some words of caution on the FHIR train was of interest to many.

12. EMR Templates – I think this was the only post on the list that I didn’t remember without looking.  No surprise, the post was from 2012.  I’m always a little scared to read some of my early blog posts.  However, this one was pretty good.  The challenge of template documentation in EHR software versus other methods is still an important discussion, but one that’s not really happening now.

13. Practice Fusion Violates Some Physicians’ Trust in Sending Millions of Emails to Their Patients – This post kind of needs no explanation.  I worked for probably a month writing it, so I’m glad that it’s still getting read.  It probably got an extra bump this year because the FTC finally closed the case against Practice Fusion that came out of this article.  It’s still an astounding story.

14. EMR Companies Holding Practice Data for “Ransom” – Wow!  Another post from 2011.  This is still a problem today, but the dynamics have changed for most companies.  Although, the challenge is likely to get even harder since many EHR vendors are now SaaS based EHR which make it even harder to get your data and easier for the EHR vendor to hold that data for “ransom.”

15. Securing Your HIPAA Controlled Computer Workstations – This post is from 2006.  My how things have changed in 10 years.  It’s an interesting look into where I started with this blog.  I’ve wondered lately if I should get back into more practical posts like this one.

16. Best Scanners for High Volume Scanning in a Doctor’s Office – A good scanner is still essential in every healthcare organization even if you have an EHR.  These Fujitsu’s are still good options, but I’ve also seen great success with the Ambir and Canon imageFormula scanners as well.

17. Don’t Blame HIPAA: It Didn’t Require Orlando Regional Medical Center To Call the President – This was a great reality check from Mike Semel on the salacious news that the President had got involved in the HIPAA issues related to the Orlando shootings.  Mike did this a number of times in 2016, so check out all his HIPAA blog posts.

18. HIPAA Cloud Bursts: New Guidance Proves Cloud Services Are Business Associates – Another great example of Mike Semel dropping HIPAA knowledge bombs.  It’s no surprise that his posts are on this list multiple times.

19. Quality Reporting: A Drain on Practice Resources, New Study Shows –  This chart from Steven’s post has really stuck with me.  The administrative bloat in healthcare is brutal.  The challenge is that I’m not sure how we get back to the more reasonable levels of the past.  Every doctor I know feels this and it’s an awful thing for patients.

20. Health Plans Need Your Records: Know What’s Driving Requests and How to Be Prepared – I’d known Craig Mercure for years and across multiple companies.  It was great to meet up with him again in 2016 at his new position at CIOX Health.  He certainly opened my eyes to the new world of health plan records requests.  CIOX has a great business doing this for health plans.

There’s a quick run down of the top blog posts on EMR and HIPAA for 2016.  Seeing all my old posts is fun and sometimes embarrassing.  I guess it does highlight the powerful long tail of great content.

Did you have a favorite EMR and HIPAA post?  We’d love to hear about it.

CVS Launches Analytics-Based Diabetes Mgmt Program For PBMs

Posted on December 29, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

CVS Health has launched a new diabetes management program for its pharmacy benefit management customers designed to improve diabetes outcomes through advanced analytics.  The new program will be available in early 2017.

The CVS program, Transform Diabetes Care, is designed to cut pharmacy and medical costs by improving diabetics’ medication adherence, A1C levels and health behaviors.

CVS is so confident that it can improve diabetics’ self-management that it’s guaranteeing that percentage increases in spending for antidiabetic meds will remain in the single digits – and apparently that’s pretty good. Or looked another way, CVS contends that its PBM clients could save anywhere from $3,000 to $5,000 per year for each member that improves their diabetes control.

To achieve these results, CVS is using analytics tools to find specific ways enrolled members can better care for themselves. The pharmacy giant is also using its Health Engagement Engine to find opportunities for personalized counseling with diabetics. The counseling sessions, driven by this technology, will be delivered at no charge to enrolled members, either in person at a CVS pharmacy location or via telephone.

Interestingly, members will also have access to diabetes visit at CVS’s Minute Clinics – at no out-of-pocket cost. I’ve seen few occasions where CVS seems to have really milked the existence of Minute Clinics for a broader purpose, and often wondered where the long-term value was in the commodity care they deliver. But this kind of approach makes sense.

Anyway, not surprisingly the program also includes a connected health component. Diabetics who participate in the program will be offered a connected glucometer, and when they use it, the device will share their blood glucose levels with a pharmacist-led team via a “health cloud.” (It might be good if CVS shared details on this — after all, calling it a health cloud is more than a little vague – but it appears that the idea is to make decentralized patient data sharing easy.) And of course, members have access to tools like medication refill reminders, plus the ability to refill a prescription via two-way texting, via the CVS Pharmacy.

Expect to see a lot more of this approach, which makes too much sense to ignore. In fact, CVS itself plans to launch a suite of “Transform Care” programs focused on managing expensive chronic conditions. I can only assume that its competitors will follow suit.

Meanwhile, I should note that while I expect to see providers launch similar efforts, so far I haven’t seen many attempts. That may be because patient engagement technology is relatively new, and probably pretty expensive too. Still, as value-based care becomes the dominant payment model, providers will need to get better at managing chronic diseases systematically. Perhaps, as the CVS effort unfolds, it can provide useful ideas to consider.