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The Newest Company to Take on Healthcare IT

Posted on April 1, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve been working on this for years, and it’s now finally come together just in time for HIMSS 2015. However, we couldn’t wait to announce it. This new company is the coming together of the top leaders in healthcare social media. Imagine if the #HIT100 all worked for one company. That’s basically what we’ve put together in this new healthcare IT company.

This new Healthcare IT company can cover any of your healthcare IT needs. For example, what kind of healthcare social media dream team would it be if we didn’t have @MandiBPro working with us. She’s the lead data geek, but her official title is Mythical Unicorn #1. If you need an XML schema merge, she’s your gal. However, what would a data geek be without a well thought out workflow? For all your healthcare workflow needs we’ve brought in @wareFLO. He’s ready and willing to solve all of your workflow challenges. No seriously. @wareFLO puts himself to sleep at night by counting the workflows.

I won’t go into all the details of who’s doing what at this new company, but here’s a quick look at some of the amazing people, titles, and skills we’ve brought together to satisfy all your needs:
@HealthcareWen – Chief of the Tweets
@2healthguru – Making You Look Good on Camera
@drnic1 – Resident CMO
@michnoteboom – Inga the Storyteller
@techguy – Chief Whipping Boy
@CariMclean – Lead Meme Creator (also lead Ballerina)
@john_chilmark – Head of Snark and Reality Checks
@Brad_Justus – ICD-10 Whisperer (He starts October 1st)
@HLSgirl – Rapper Queen B (see this..nuff said)
@sarahbennight – Chief Happiness Officer
@Greg_Meyer93 – Push Up Challenge Coordinator
@FarzadsBowtie – Chief Style Coordinator (HIT Never looked so good)
@askjoyrios – Customer Service Master (Could she ever be mean? Answer: NO! That’s why she handles the customers.)
@Colin_Hung – International Lead (Assuming you consider Canada international)
@HITConfGuy – Chief Health IT Conference Coordinator
@laurencstill – Chief Useless (but necessary) Documentation Creator

You might be asking yourself, who’s the leader of this group of healthcare IT social media misfits? The answer is simple: no one. We believe in the principles of Holocracy and so there’s no need for a specific leader. We all just do our work and everyone’s happy. Sounds nice doesn’t it?

I’m sure you’re all thinking to yourself, how do I get a job at this new company? I want to work with this amazing cornucopia of people! We’ll be hiring healthcare IT professionals soon.

Without further ado, I’m excited to officially announce the launch of #FoolHIT. If there’s an HIT problem, Yo, we’ll solve it. Check out our social stats while my Hootsuite revolves it. HIT HIT Baby…To Go…HIT HIT Baby To Go To go. (Yes, that’s our theme song.)

We’ll see if the company lasts until tomorrow.

Solving the Non-EHR Challenges Healthcare Faces

Posted on March 31, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is an interview with Vishal Gandhi, CEO of ClinicSpectrum as part of the Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with him on Twitter @ClinicSpectrum and @csvishal2222.

As we head into the massive HIMSS healthcare IT conference in Chicago, I’ve been thinking a lot about the shift in healthcare technology that’s occurred over the past 5-10 years. When I first started attending HIMSS, I was all about the EHR company and what they had to offer. That trend continued on the back of $36 billion in government EHR incentive money. Now that EHR adoption is more mature, practices are becoming more and more interested in non-EHR technologies that can improve the way they work.

With that in mind, I took some time to sit down and talk with Vishal Gandhi, CEO of ClinicSpectrum to talk about their non-EHR solutions. Vishal and his team have been thinking about non-EHR technologies and pairing those with low cost human touch for a long time. For example, here’s a look at some of the challenges they’ve tackled:

  • Patient Collections
  • Physician Credentialing
  • IT Support
  • Medical Billing
  • Meaningful Patient Engagement
  • Staff Productivity

If your practice or company is facing any of these challenges, take a minute to watch my interview with Vishal to learn more about their unique approach to solving these challenges:

Also, if you don’t have time to watch the whole video interview, they’ve created this great graphic which illustrates the suite of challenges practices face today and solutions (click to see larger version of graphic):
ClinicSpectrum Healthcare IT Ecosystem

The Cost Effective Healthcare Workflow Series of blog posts is sponsored by ClinicSpectrum, a leading provider of workflow automation solutions for healthcare. Check out their suite of hybrid workflow solutions on ClinicSpectrum.com or schedule a meeting with them at HIMSS Booth: 5427 by tweeting @ClinicSpectrum.

What Technologies are Coming to the Waiting Room?

Posted on March 30, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Waiting Rooms

I saw this image and couldn’t help but laugh. I laugh partially because waiting in a doctor’s office is probably the only time I read a magazine these days. There’s something fun about reading a 3 year old Sports Illustrated in a doctor’s office. Although, I’m often checking my phone instead of the magazine. So, I guess like most consumers I’ll take both.

However, more importantly, this funny image started me thinking about what technologies we’ll see in the waiting room of the future. There are a number of companies (Phreesia and Epion Health) that are working with clinics to provide patients with clinic provided tablets in their waiting rooms. These mostly offer patients a way to digitally check in for their appointment, make paymens and possibly some patient education. These companies often have an interesting model that’s based on advertising or data collection and so be careful to ask the company how they make their money if you choose to go that direction.

What’s even more interesting to me is how we’re going to start leveraging patients’ devices in the waiting room. The majority of them have one and that number is going to continue to grow. The challenges is that it can be tough for a medical practice to make a really good use case for why a patient should download their app. Now imagine you’re a chronic patient. Would you download a new app for each doctor you visit? I’m a little torn on how this is going to play out, but someone is going to make some headway and really start leveraging a patient’s own device as part of the visit and that includes the time they’re waiting.

Whole companies have been built around technology to stream content to a TV in physicians’ waiting rooms. They usually provide them to the doctor for free and then make their money on the advertising and sponsored content they provide. It turns out that patients waiting in an exam room are an extremely captive audience. Plus, you can often target the advertising based on specialty (ie. GYN is mostly women, pediatrics are often parents, etc). However, how effective will this be if we all have our heads in our devices while waiting for the doctor?

Of course, telemedicine is starting to make the waiting rooms more empty. We still have a long ways to go with that and we’ll never entirely replace the office visit, but that will definitely change the dynamic of how we wait for a doctor.

I still feel like I’m not thinking far enough outside the box. What do you think? How will the waiting room of the future compare to today? What technology will we find in waiting rooms?

Learning Health Care System

Posted on March 27, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent post by Andy Oram on EMR and EHR titles “Exploring the Role of Clinical Documentation: a Step Toward EHRs for Learning” he introduced me to the idea of what he called a Learning Health Care System. Here’s his description:

Currently a popular buzzword, a learning health care system collects data from clinicians, patients, and the general population to look for evidence and correlations that can improve the delivery of health care. The learning system can determine the prevalence of health disorders in an area, pick out which people are most at risk, find out how well treatments work, etc. It is often called a “closed loop system” because it can draw on information generated from within the system to change course quickly.

I really love the concept and description of a learning healthcare system. Unfortunately, I see so very little of this in our current EHR technology and that’s a travesty. However, it’s absolutely the way we need to head. Andy add this insight into why we don’t yet have a learning health care system:

“Vendors need to improve the ability of systems to capture and manage structured data.” We need structured data for our learning health care system, and we can’t wait for natural language processing to evolve to the point where it can reliably extract the necessary elements of a document.

While I agree that managed structured data would be helpful in reaching the vision of a learning healthcare system, I don’t think we have to wait for that to happen. We can already use the data that’s available to make our EHRs smarter than they are today. Certainly we can’t do everything that we’d like to do with them, but we can do something. We shouldn’t do nothing just because we can’t do everything.

Plus, I’ve written about this a number of times before, but we need to create a means for the healthcare system to learn and for healthcare systems to be able to easily share that learning. This might be a different definition of leaning than what Andy described. I think he was referencing a learning system that learns about the patient. I’m taking it one step further and we need a healthcare system that learns something about technology or data to be able to easily share that learning with other outside healthcare systems. That would be powerful.

What are your thoughts on what Andy calls a popular buzzword: A Learning Health Care System? Are we heading that direction? What’s holding us back?

Human Error Healthcare Data Breach Infographic

Posted on March 26, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

You all know I’m a sucker for an infographic and this one illustrates a topic we’ve known for a long time: humans are one of the biggest breach challenges. All the encryption and firewalls in the world can’t solve for a human who already has access. This infographic really illustrates that point well.

Human Error and Healthcare Data Breaches
Infographic based on ICO FOI request data by Egress Software Technologies, providers of email security as well as large file transfer and encryption software.

Healthcare: Prescribing a Hot Meal or Heating for Your House

Posted on March 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When we think of healthcare, we often think of the doctors office or a hospital. We’ve talked many times before how doctors and hospitals today are really about sick care and not health care. If we were really worried about caring for the health of patients, we’d need to do so much more outside of the 4 walls of a doctor’s office or hospital. In fact, we know that it’s the 99% of time at home, work, etc that most influences our health.

With this as background, I was fascinated by this HP article which talks about a new kind of Big Data for healthcare. The article interviews Rebecca Onie, Co-Founder of Health Leads. This excerpt from the article describes the problem they’re trying to solve:

The work was borne out of conversations with physicians who professed profound frustration with delivering care to vulnerable patients. Patients would come into the clinic on a regular basis, and let’s say a kid has an ear infection. A physician can prescribe antibiotics, but the real issue is that there’s no food at home or they’re living in a car. Ninety percent of health outcomes are actually not dictated by clinical healthcare but by these other factors.

Doctors told me, “We don’t ask about these issues, because there’s nothing we can do. We know [healthful food] will have a more profound impact on our patients than anything we’re going to do in the next 13 minutes inside the four walls of the doctor’s office.”

I had a similar conversation with Mandi Bishop, Health Plan Analytics Innovation & Consulting Solutions Owner at Dell Healthcare and Life Sciences, when we were chatting at the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event. She highlighted to me how payers are now looking at how they can pay for ramps in people’s homes in order to help reduce the number of falls that occur.

I love how these simple ideas are so powerful. Obviously, the doctor who treats a person’s cough and cold isn’t very effective if that person goes back to a house which has no heat. We’re treating the symptom, not the problem. We can take care of the broken bones, bruises and other damage that comes from falls, or we could spend much less money preventing the falls by putting in a ramp at someone’s house.

We all intellectually understand why these changes should happen. However, there’s a massive challenge in being able to actually execute these programs. No payer wants to build out the “ramp building” capabilities that are needed to solve this problem. No doctor wants to be calling the utility companies to make sure that someone’s heat gets turned back on. However, they could partner with organizations like Health Leads to get this accomplished.

I know I’m still chewing on this idea. It’s absolutely expanded my thinking when it comes to healthcare and how we can really improve health. I hope it does the same for you. I also love describing it as a prescription for heat or a prescribing a hot meal. Maybe that’s corruption of the word prescription, but it definitely illustrates the idea so well.

Which EHR vendor is going to build in this new subscription service? Yeah, that’s right. None of them. Thus why the EHR vendor needs to open up the kimono for other people to deliver this type of service on top of the EHR platform.

There’s More to HIPAA Compliance Than Encryption

Posted on March 24, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Asaf Cidon, CEO and Co-Founder of Sookasa.
Asaf Cidon
The news that home care provider Amedisys had a HIPAA breach involving more than 100 lost laptops—even though they contained encrypted PHI—might have served as a wake-up call to many healthcare providers.  Most know by now that they need to encrypt their files to comply with HIPAA and prevent a breach. While it’s heartening to see increased focus on encryption, it’s not enough to simply encrypt data. To ensure compliance and real security, it’s critical to also manage and monitor access to protected health information.

Here’s what you should look for from any cloud-based solution to help you remain compliant.

  1. Centralized, administrative dashboard: The underlying goal of HIPAA compliance is to ensure that ­­organizations have meaningful control over their sensitive information. In that sense, a centralized dashboard is essential to provide a way for the practice to get a lens into the activities of the entire organization. HIPAA also stipulates that providers be able to get Emergency Access to necessary electronic protected health information in urgent situations, and a centralized, administrative dashboard that’s available on the web can provide just that.
  1. Audit trails: A healthcare organization should be able to track every encrypted file across the entire organization. That means logging every modification, copy, access, or share operation made to encrypted files—and associating each with a particular user.
  1. Integrity control: HIPAA rules mandate that providers be able to ensure that ePHI security hasn’t been compromised. Often, that’s an element of the audit trails. But it also means that providers should be able to preserve a complete history of confidential files to help track and recover any changes made to those files over time. This is where encryption can play a helpful role too: Encryption can render it impossible to modify files without access to the private encryption keys.
  1. Device loss / theft protection: The Amedisys situation illustrates the real risk posed by lost and stolen devices. Amedisys took the important first step of encrypting sensitive files. But it isn’t the only one to take. When a device is lost or stolen, it might seem like there’s little to be done. But steps can and should be taken to decrease the impact a breach in progress. Certain cloud security solutions provide a device block feature, which administrators can use to remotely wipe the keys associated with certain devices and users so that the sensitive information can no longer be accessed. Automatic logoff also helps, because terminating a session after a period of inactivity can help prevent unauthorized access.
  1. Employee termination help: Procedures should be implemented to prevent terminated employees from accessing ePHI. But the ability to physically block a user from accessing information takes it a step further. Technical tools such as a button that revokes or changes access permission in real-time can make a big impact.

Of course encryption is still fundamental to HIPAA compliance. In fact, it should be at the center of any sound security policy—but it’s not the only step to be taken. The right solution for your practice will integrate each of these security measures to help ensure HIPAA compliance—and overall cyber security.

About Asaf Cidon
Asaf Cidon is CEO and co-founder of cloud security company Sookasa, which encrypts, audits and controls access to files on Dropbox and connected devices, and complies with HIPAA and other regulations. Cidon holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University, where he specialized in mobile and cloud computing.

Finding Simple Healthcare IT Solutions to Annoying Problems

Posted on March 23, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In my recent video interview with Lindy Benton, CEO of MEA|NEA, I came away with the feeling that there are a wide variety of simple healthcare IT solutions for many of the problems that annoy us in healthcare. In Lindy’s case, they work on solving the secure document transfer problem in healthcare. They work mostly with claims remediation and other billing related documentation, but the secure document transfer applies to a lot of areas of healthcare.

As a tech person, I was interested in how rather simple technology can solve such an important problem. However, Lindy and I talk about why many organizations still haven’t adopted these technologies in their office (Spoiler: The divide between billing organizations and IT). We also talk about why EHR vendors aren’t just providing these types of secure document transfer solutions.

You can watch my full video interview with Lindy Benton below:

Recorded Video from Dell Healthcare Think Tank Event – #DoMoreHIT

Posted on March 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I mentioned that I was going to be on the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event again this year. It was my 3rd time participating and it didn’t disappoint. In fact, this one dove into a number of insurance topics which we hadn’t ever covered before. I really learned a lot from the discussions and hopefully others learned from me.

Plus, in the first session I had the privilege to sit next to Dr. Eric Topol. He’s got such great insights into what’s happening in healthcare. Of course, I’m also always amazed by Mandi Bishop, who many of you may know from Twitter or her Eyes Wide Shut series here on EMR and HIPAA.

In case you missed the live stream of the event, you can find each of the three recorded sessions below. I also posted the 3 drawings that were created during the event on EMR and EHR. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on what was shared. Thanks Dell for hosting the conversation that brought together so many perspectives from across healthcare.

Session 1: Consumer Engagement & Social Media

Session 2: Bridging the Gap Between Providers, Payers and Patients

Session 3: Entrepreneurship & Innovation

The Future Of…Patient Engagement

Posted on March 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

Healthcare has a major challenge when it comes to the term “Patient Engagement.” $36 billion of government money and something called meaningful use has corrupted the word Patient Engagement. While meaningful use requires “5% patient engagement”, that’s a far cry from actually engaging with patients. Anyone that’s attested to meaningful use knows what I mean.

As we move past meaningful use, what then will patient engagement actually look like?

When I start to think about the future of patient engagement, I’m taken back to my experience with a new primary care provider that’s trying to Restore Humanity to Healthcare (see Restore Humanity to Healthcare part 2 as well). In this case, I’m exploring the idea of unlimited primary care along with a primary care team that includes a doctor, but also includes a wellness coordinator that’s interested in my wellness and not just my presenting problem.

Once you take the payment portion out of primary care, it dramatically changes the equation for me. Gone are the fears of going to the doctor because you don’t want to pay the co-pay. Gone are the days where a doctor needs to see you in the office in order to be able to make money from the visit. With unlimited primary care, an email, phone call or text message that solves the problem is a great solution for the doctor and the patient.

Of course, this model of primary care is only one example of the shift that’s going to drive us to patient engagement. ACOs and value based care models are going to require a much deeper relationship between doctors and patients. Trust me that 5% patient engagement through an online portal isn’t going to be enough in these new models.

Plus, these new models are going to really convert our current sick care system into a true healthcare system. I like to call this new model “Treating Healthy Patients.” Quite frankly we’re not ready for this change right now, but in the future we’ll have to adapt. The biggest change is going to be in how we define “patient” and “healthy.”

The wave of connected medical devices and innovation are going to completely reframe how we look at health. Instead of describing ourselves as healthy, the data will tell us that we’re all sick. We’re just at different points in the continuum of sickness.

In the future, patient engagement will be the key to treating each of us individually. The symptoms will change from coughing and vomiting to 85% risk for diabetes and 76% risk for a heart attack. We thought we had patient compliance issues when someone is coughing and vomiting (ie. something they want to fix). Now imagine patient compliance challenges when the patient isn’t feeling any pain, but they need to change something in order to avoid some major health problem.

I think this describes perfectly why we’re entering one of the most challenging times in healthcare. It’s a dramatic shift in how we think about healthcare and has a new set of more challenging problems that we’ve never solved. One of the keys to solving these new challenges is patient engagement.