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Vendors Bring Heart And Lung Sounds To EHR

Posted on June 3, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

In what they say is a first, a group of technology vendors has teamed up to add heart and lung sounds to an EMR. The current effort extends only to the drchrono EHR, but if this rollout works, it seems likely that other vendors will follow, as adding multimedia content to patient medical records is a very logical step.

Urgent care provider Direct Urgent Care, a Berkeley, CA-based urgent care provider with 30,000 patients, is rolling out the Eko Core Digital Stethoscope for use by physicians. The heart and lung sounds will be recorded by the digital stethoscope, then transmitted wirelessly to a phone- or tablet-based mobile app. The app, in turn, uploads the audio files to the drchrono HR.

Ordinarily, I’d see this as an early experiment in managing multimedia health data and leave it at that. But two things make it more interesting.

One is that the Eko Core sells for a relatively modest $299, which is not bad for an FDA-cleared device. (Eko also sells an attachment for $199 which digitizes and records sounds captured by traditional analog stethoscopes, as well as streaming those files to the Eko app.) The other is that the recorded sounds can be shared with remote specialists such as cardiologists and pulmonologists, which seems valuable on its face even if the data doesn’t get stored within an EMR.

Not only that, this rollout underscores a problem just been given too little attention. At present, what I’ve seen, few EMRs incorporated anything beyond text. Even radiology images, which have been digital for ages (and managed by sophisticated PACS platforms) typically aren’t accessible to the EMR interface. In fact, my understanding is that PACS data is another silo that needs to be broken down.

Meanwhile, medical practices and hospitals are increasingly generating data that doesn’t fit into the existing EMR template, from sources such as wearables, health apps and video consults. Neither EMR developers nor standards organizations seem to have kept up with the influx of emerging non-text data, so virtually none of it is being integrated into patient records yet.

In other words, not only is it interesting to note that an EMR vendor is incorporating audio into medical records, at a modest cost, it’s worth taking stock of what it can teach us about enriching digital patient records overall.

Eventually, after all, patients will be able to capture — with some degree of accuracy — multimedia content that includes not only audio, but also ultrasound recordings, EKG charts and more. Of course, these self-administered tests and will never replace a consult by a skilled clinician, but there certainly are situations in which this data will be relevant.

When you also bear in mind that the number of telemedicine consults being conducted is growing dramatically, and that these, too, offer insights that could become part of a patient’s chart, the need to go beyond text-based EMRs becomes even more evident.

So maybe the Eko/drchrono partnership will work out, and maybe it won’t. But what they’re doing matters nonetheless.

Galaxy Will See You Now

Posted on May 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

We all know how dramatic our lives have changed thanks to technology. Many of us remember the impact a computer in every home had on our lives. Now we’re seeing that same transformation happening as we all start carrying a smartphone in our pocket. Each of these technologies has opened up new worlds of possibilities in our personal lives and also for healthcare. I think we’ll see a similar transformation with the introduction of voice recognition and AI (Artificial Intelligence).

When we start talking about AI, most of us probably think about the movies they’ve seen where AI was on display. Hollywood’s use of AI in movies often makes it so it doesn’t feel very real. However, if you have a smartphone, then you’ve probably used AI. I know my first real experience with AI was on my Samsung Galaxy S3. I remember my wife and I going on a date and we spent the majority of our date asking “Galaxy” various questions. We got surprisingly good answers including easy access to the show times for the movie we ended up seeing.

Most of us have had this type of experience with AI on our smartphone. It’s pretty magical, but I must admit that I didn’t use it that often when it was just on my phone. There were a few cases it was really useful like when I was driving and needed directions to a gas station. The hands-free access to information was extremely powerful, but it wasn’t part of my daily experience. However, that changed for me when I introduced an always on AI solution in my home. Now it’s become a daily part of me and my family’s life.

How does this apply to healthcare? It’s becoming very clear that the home is the healthcare hub of the future. Think about having always on tablets, smart TVs, and other devices positioned throughout your home where you can easily access your health information, medical knowledge, and healthcare providers. That’s powerful. Plus, those devices and attached sensors are starting to easily monitor you, your environment, and your health. This two way connection creates an extremely powerful combination that will change the way we view healthcare.

Certainly there are practical examples of home health services that exist today including monitoring recently discharged patients, monitoring seniors, connecting patients with doctors, and much more. We’re seeing all of these connected home health services happen more and more every day. Just what we’ve already begun to implement will improve the healthcare we provide dramatically. However, we’re just starting to explore what AI and new technologies can do for healthcare. The best is still to come.

How long will it be before we can sit at home and we can ask our tablet or smart TV “Galaxy, how’s my blood pressure doing today?” Or “Galaxy, can you schedule me a telemedicine visit with my doctor to discuss my prescription refill?” Not to mention Galaxy proactively reaching out to you to motivate healthy decision making.

What’s so incredible is that executing these ideas and many more aren’t that farfetched given the powerful technology that exists today. We still need to connect a few dots, but it’s all extremely doable from a technical perspective.

What’s going to be harder is the cultural shift and change of mindset. However, that’s happening already and it will accelerate over time. I’m sure my kids wouldn’t think twice about asking our TV or tablet for a doctor’s appointment and then having the doctor streamed right to the TV or their tablet. They probably wonder why it’s not already possible.

Even while we wait for this more automated AI future, there are still big home health things happening on smartphones and tablets. Each of those things is a building block to this exalted future. I’m ready for Galaxy to see me now. In fact, in some ways he already does. Are you ready?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Steps In Integrating Patient-Generated Health Data

Posted on May 24, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As the number of connected health devices in use has expanded, healthcare leaders have grappled with how to best leverage the data they generate. However, aside from a few largely experimental attempts, few providers are making active use of such data.

Part of the reason is that the connected health market is still maturing. With health tracking wearables, remote monitoring set-ups, mobile apps and more joining the chorus, it might be too soon to try and normalize all this data, much less harvest it for clinical use. Also, few healthcare organizations seem to have a mature strategy in place for digital health.

But technical issues may be the least of our problems. It’s important to note that providers have serious concerns around patient-generated health data (PGHD), ranging from questions about its validity to fears that such data will overwhelm them.

However, it’s possible to calm these fears, argues Christina Caraballo, senior healthcare strategist at Get Real Health.  Here’s her list of the top five concerns she’s heard from providers, with responses that may help put providers at ease:

  • Fear they’ll miss something in the flood of data. Add disclaimers, consent forms, video clips or easy-to-digest graphics clarifying what consumers can and can’t expect, explicitly limiting provider liability.
  • Worries over data privacy and security: Give consumers back some of the risk, by emphasizing that no medium is perfectly secure, including paper health records, and that they must determine whether the benefits of using digital health devices outweigh the risks.
  • Questions about data integrity and standardization: Emphasize that while the industry has made great process and standardization, interoperability, authentication, data provenance, reliability, validity, clinical value and even workflow, the bottom line is that the data still comes from patients, who don’t always report everything regardless of how you collect the data.
  • Concerns about impact on workflow: Underscore that if the data is presented in the right framework, it will be digestible in much the same way as other electronic medical data.
  • Resistance to pressure from consumers: Don’t demand that providers leverage PGHD out of the gate; instead, move incrementally into the PGHD management by letting patients collect data electronically, and then incorporate data into clinical systems once all stakeholders are on board.

Now, I’m not totally uncritical of Ms. Caraballo’s article. In particular, I take issue with her assertion that providers who balk at using PGHD are “naysayers” who “simply don’t want to change.” While there are always a few folks fitting this description in any profession, the concerns she outlines aren’t trivial, and brushing them off with vague reassurances won’t work.

Truthfully, if I were a provider I doubt I would be comfortable relying on PGHD, especially biometric data. As Ingrid Oakley-Girvan of Medable notes, wearables giant Fitbit was hit with a lawsuit earlier this year alleging that its heart rate monitoring technology is inaccurate, and I wouldn’t be surprised other such suits arise. Digital health trackers and apps have transitioned from novelty to quasi-official medical device very quickly — some might say too quickly – and being cautious about their output just makes sense.

Nonetheless, PGHD will play a role in patient care and management at some point in the future, and it makes sense to keep providers in the loop as these technologies progress. But rushing them into using such data would not be wise. Let’s make sure such technologies are vetted before they assume a routine role in care.

Managing Your Large Medical Equipment Purchases

Posted on May 3, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live video interview, you can find the recorded video here:

On Thursday, May 5, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT) join us for a live video interview with Nancy Hannan, Philips Relationship Director at Augusta University Health System (formerly known as Georgia Regents) where we’ll be discussing the unique approach Nancy and her team at Augusta University Health System have taken to acquisition and management of their large medical purchases through a unique alliance with Philips.
2016 May - Managing Your Large Medical Equipment Purchases-blog
The great part is that you can join my live conversation with Nancy and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask her questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Thursday, May 5, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 20-30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

We hope you’ll join us live or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation. Nancy has some really great insights to share from the unique alliance between Philips and Augusta University Health System. We’ll talk about the challenges they faced in managing and replacing old medical equipment and the proactive efforts they’re taking to ensure that their patients and providers are getting the highest quality, safest care possible.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Medical Device Security At A Crossroads

Posted on April 28, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As anyone reading this knows, connected medical devices are vulnerable to attacks from outside malware. Security researchers have been warning healthcare IT leaders for years that network-connected medical devices had poor security in place, ranging from image repository backups with no passwords to CT scanners with easily-changed configuration files, but far too many problems haven’t been addressed.

So why haven’t providers addressed the security problems? It may be because neither medical device manufacturers nor hospitals are set up to address these issues. “The reality is both sides — providers and manufacturers — do not understand how much the other side does not know,” said John Gomez, CEO of cybersecurity firm Sensato. “When I talk with manufacturers, they understand the need to do something, but they have never had to deal with cyber security before. It’s not a part of their DNA. And on the hospital side, they’re realizing that they’ve never had to lock these things down. In fact, medical devices have not even been part of the IT group and hospitals.

Gomez, who spoke with Healthcare IT News, runs one of two companies backing a new initiative dedicated to securing medical devices and health organizations. (The other coordinating company is healthcare security firm Divurgent.)

Together, the two have launched the Medical Device Cybersecurity Task Force, which brings together a grab bag of industry players including hospitals, hospital technologists, medical device manufacturers, cyber security researchers and IT leaders. “We continually get asked by clients with the best practices for securing medical devices,” Gomez told Healthcare IT News. “There is little guidance and a lot of misinformation.“

The task force includes 15 health systems and hospitals, including Children’s Hospital of Atlanta, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Beebe Healthcare and Intermountain, along with tech vendors Renovo Solutions, VMware Inc. and AirWatch.

I mention this initiative not because I think it’s huge news, but rather, as a reminder that the time to act on medical device vulnerabilities is more than nigh. There’s a reason why the Federal Trade Commission, and the HHS Office of Inspector General, along with the IEEE, have launched their own initiatives to help medical device manufacturers boost cybersecurity. I believe we’re at a crossroads; on one side lies renewed faith in medical devices, and on the other nothing less than patient privacy violations, harm and even death.

It’s good to hear that the Task Force plans to create a set of best practices for both healthcare providers and medical device makers which will help get their cybersecurity practices up to snuff. Another interesting effort they have underway in the creation of an app which will help healthcare providers evaluate medical devices, while feeding a database that members can access to studying the market.

But reading about their efforts also hammered home to me how much ground we have to cover in securing medical devices. Well-intentioned, even relatively effective, grassroots efforts are good, but they’re only a drop in the bucket. What we need is nothing less than a continuous knowledge feed between medical device makers, hospitals, clinics and clinicians.

And why not start by taking the obvious step of integrating the medical device and IT departments to some degree? That seems like a no-brainer. But unfortunately, the rest of the work to be done will take a lot of thought.

Origami Inspired Medical Devices

Posted on April 7, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently came across some amazing technology that uses Origami to be able to make surgical tools so small that the incision needed for an operation could be much smaller. The work is being done by a group out of Brigham Young University in partnership with Intuitive Surgical, makers of the da Vinci Surgical robot. Here’s a video overview of the technology:

I love that the principles they used for NASA also apply to the medical field. Both fields want to take something that’s small and make it much larger. Although, the definition of “small” and “larger” are relative.

While we haven’t covered as many medical devices on this blog before, seeing inspirational things like this makes me think that maybe we should spend a lot more time learning about the innovations happening in this space.

Accessing Near-Real Time Patient Data In & Out of the Hospital with Alan Portela

Posted on March 15, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: If you missed the live video of this chat with Alan Portela, you can watch the recorded version below:

Accessing Near-Real Time Patient Data In and Out of the Hospital

On Thursday, March 17, 2016 at 3 PM ET (Noon PT) join us for a live video interview with Alan Portela, CEO of AirStrip. Alan is one of the most insightful people I’ve ever met in healthcare. He has a great mix of experience and vision for what’s happening in healthcare IT and where it needs to go in the future. Not to mention he understands some of the reasons it hasn’t gotten there yet. I always learn something when I talk with Alan and so I’m excited to share this live interview with the Healthcare Scene community.

The great part is that you can join my live conversation with Alan and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask him questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Thursday, March 17, 2016 at 3 PM ET (Noon PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

We hope you’ll join us live or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation. You won’t be disappointed by Alan Portela’s insights into the world of near real-time streaming of health data to mobile devices. AirStrip has done some really amazing things in this regard and Alan has a deep knowledge of this industry.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Patient Engagement Will Be Key to Personalized Medicine and Healthcare Analytics

Posted on February 16, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When I wrote about personalized medicine solutions that are available today, I mostly covered the data aspects of personalized medicine. It’s a logical place to start since the basis of personalized medicine is data. In that post I highlighted the SAP Foundation for Health and the SAP Hana platform along with the work of ASCO and their CancerLinQ project. No doubt there are hundreds of other examples around health care where data is being used to personalize the care that’s provided.

It makes a lot of sense for a company like SAP to take on the data aspects of personalized medicine. SAP is known for doing massive data from complex data sets. They’re great at sorting through a wide variety of data from multiple sources and they’re even working on new innovations where they can analyze your data quickly and effectively without having to export every single piece of data to some massive (Translation: Expensive) enterprise data warehouse. Plus, in many cases they’re doing all of this health data analytics in the cloud so you can be sure that your healthcare analytics solution can scale. While this is a huge step forward, it is just the start.

As I look at the discussion around personalized medicine, what seems to be missing is a focus on creating a connection with the patient. Far too often, analytics vendors in healthcare just want to worry about the data analysis and don’t build out the tools required to engage with the patient directly. This leads to poor patient engagement in two ways: improving patient communication and collecting patient data.

Improving Patient Communication
As we look into the future of reimbursement in healthcare, it’s easy to see how crucial it will be to leverage the right data to identify the right patients. However, you can’t stop there. Once you’ve identified the right patients, you have to have a seamless and effective way to regularly communicate with that patient. As value based reimbursement becomes a reality, no healthcare analytics solution will be complete without the functionality to truly engage with the patient and improve their health.

Patient engagement platforms will require the following three fundamentals to start improving care: interaction between patient and caregiver, privacy, and security. No doubt we’re already starting to see a wide variety of approaches to how you’ll communicate with and engage the patient. However, if you don’t get these three fundamentals down then all of the rest doesn’t really matter. The basis of improved patient communication is going to be efficient communication between patient and caregiver in a secure and private manner.

Collecting Patient Data
Too many analytics platforms only focus on the data that comes from the healthcare providers like the EHR. As the health sensor market matures, more and more clinically relevant data is going to be generated by the patient and the devices they use at home. In fact, in some areas like diabetes this is already happening. Over the next 5 years we’re going to start seeing this type of patient generated data spread across every disease state.

Health analytics platforms of the future are going to have to be able to handle all of this patient generated health data. The key first step is to make it easy for the patient to connect their health devices to your platform. The second step is to convert this wave of patient generated health data into something that can easily be consumed by the healthcare provider. Both steps will be necessary for personalized medicine to become a reality in health care.

As we head into HIMSS 2016 in a couple weeks, I’ll be looking at which vendors are taking analytics to the next level by including patient engagement. While there’s a lot of value in processing healthcare provider data, the future of personalized medicine will have to include the patient in both how we communicate with them and how we incorporate the data they collect the 99% of their lives spent outside of the hospital.

SAP is uniquely positioned to help advance personalized medicine. The SAP Foundation for Health is built on the SAP Hana platform which provides scalable cloud analytics solutions across the spectrum of healthcare. SAP is a sponsor of Influential Networks of which Healthcare Scene is a member. You can learn more about SAP’s healthcare solutions during #HIMSS16 at Booth #5828.

The Value of Standardizing Mobile Devices in Your Healthcare Organization

Posted on February 10, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Before becoming a full time healthcare IT blogger, I worked doing system administration and top to bottom IT support (I am @techguy on Twitter after all). While that now seems like somewhat of a past life, it never ceases to amaze me how the lessons that applied to technology 10 years ago come around again 10 years later.

A great example of this is in the devices an organization purchases. I learned really early on in my technology career the importance of creating a standard set of products that we would support as an IT organization. This was true when ordering desktop computers, laptops, printers, and even servers. The benefits to doing so were incredible and most technology people understand the benefits.

You can create a standard image which you put on the device. If one device breaks you can easily swap it for a similar device or use parts from two broken down devices to make one that works. When someone calls for support, with a standard set of devices you can more easily provide them the support they need.

Another one of the unseen benefits of setting and sticking to a standard set of devices is you can then often leverage the vendor provided management tools for those devices instead of investing in an expensive third party solution. This can be really powerful for an organization since the device management software that’s available today has gotten really good.

What’s unfortunate is that the way mobile devices were rolled out in healthcare, many organizations forgot this important lesson and they’ve got a bit of a hodgepodge of devices in their organization. I encourage these organizations to get back to creating and sticking to a standard set of devices when purchasing mobile devices. No doubt you’ll get a little backlash from people who like to do their own thing, but the cost of providing support and maintenance for a potpourri of devices is just not worth it.

What’s been your organization’s mobile device strategy? Have you created and stuck to a standard device or do you have a mix of devices?

Securing Mobile Devices in Healthcare

Posted on February 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

When you look at healthcare security on the whole, I think everyone would agree that healthcare has a lot of work to do. Just taking into account the top 5 health data breaches in 2015, approximately 30-35% of people in the US have had their health data breached. I’m afraid that in 2016 these numbers are likely going to get worse. Let me explain why I think this is the case.

First, meaningful use required healthcare organizations to do a HIPAA risk assessment. While many organizations didn’t really do a high quality HIPAA risk assessment, it still motivated a number of organizations to do something about privacy and security. Even if it wasn’t the step forward many would like, it was still a step forward.

Now that meaningful use is being replaced, what other incentive are doctors going to have to take a serious look at privacy and security? If 1/3 of patients having their records breached in 2015 isn’t motivating enough, what’s going to change in 2016?

Second, hackers are realizing the value of health data and the ease with which they can breach health data systems. Plus, with so many organizations going online with their EHR software and other healthcare IT software, these are all new targets for hackers to attack.

Third, while every doctor in healthcare had a mobile device, not that many of them accessed their EHR on their mobile device since many EHR vendors didn’t support mobile devices very well. Over the next few years we’ll see EHR vendors finally produce high quality, native mobile apps that access EHR software. Once they do, not only will doctors be accessing patient data on their mobile device, but so will nurses, lab staff, HIM, etc. While all of this mobility is great, it creates a whole new set of vulnerabilities that can be exploited if not secured properly.

I’m not sure what we can do to make organizations care about privacy and security. Although, once a breach happens they start to care. We’re also not going to be able to stem the tide of hackers being interested in stealing health data. However, we can do something about securing the plethora of mobile devices in healthcare. In fact, it’s a travesty when we don’t since mobile device security has become so much easier.

I remember in the early days of smartphones, there weren’t very many great enterprise tools to secure your smartphones. These days there are a ton of great options and many of them come natively from the vendor who provides you the phone. Many are even integrated into the phone’s hardware as well as software. A good example of this is the mobile security platform, Samsung KNOX™. Take a look at some of its features:

  • Separate Work and Personal Data (Great for BYOD)
  • Multi-layered Hardware and Software Security
  • Easy Mobile Device Management Integration
  • Enterprise Grade Security and Encryption

It wasn’t that long ago that we had to kludge together multiple solutions to achieve all of these things. Now they come in one nice, easy to implement package. The excuses of why we don’t secure mobile devices in healthcare should disappear. If a breach occurs in your organization because a mobile device wasn’t secure, I assure you that those excuses will feel pretty hollow.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare