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Vocera Aims For More Intelligent Hospital Interventions

Posted on November 14, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Everyday scenes that Vocera Communications would like to eliminate from hospitals:

  • A nurse responds to an urgent change in the patient’s condition. While the nurse is caring for the patient, monitors continue to go off with alerts about the situation, distracting her and increasing the stress for both herself and the patient.

  • A monitor beeps in response to a dangerous change in a patient’s condition. A nurse pages the physician in charge. The physician calls back to the nurse’s station, but the nurse is off on another task. They play telephone tag while patient needs go unmet around the floor.

  • A nurse is engaged in a delicate operation when her mobile device goes off, distracting her at a crucial moment. Neither the patient she is currently working with nor the one whose condition triggered the alert gets the attention he needs.

  • A nurse describes a change in a patient’s condition to a physician, who promises to order a new medication. The nurse then checks the medical record every few minutes in the hope of seeing when the order went through. (This is similar to a common computing problem called “polling”, where a software or hardware component wakes up regularly just to see whether data has come in for it to handle.)

Wasteful, nerve-racking situations such as these have caught the attention of Vocera over the past several years as it has rolled out communications devices and services for hospital staff, and have just been driven forward by its purchase of the software firm Extension Healthcare.

Vocera Communications’ and Extension Healthcare’s solutions blend to take pressures off clinicians in hospitals and improve their responses to patient needs. According to Brent Lang, President and CEO of Vocera Communications, the two companies partnered together on 40 customers before the acquisition. They take data from multiple sources–such as patient monitors and electronic health records–to make intelligent decisions about “when to send alarms, whom to send them to, and what information to include” so the responding nurse or doctor has the information needed to make a quick and effective intervention.

Hospitals are gradually adopting technological solutions that other parts of society got used to long ago. People are gradually moving away from setting their lights and thermostats by hand to Internet-of-Things systems that can adjust the lights and thermostats according to who is in the house. The combination of Vocera and Extension Healthcare should be able to do the same for patient care.

One simple example concerns the first scenario with which I started this article. Vocera can integrate with the hospital’s location monitoring (through devices worn by health personnel) that the system can consult to see whether the nurse is in the same room as the patient for whom the alert is generated. The system can then stop forwarding alarms about that patient to the nurse.

The nurse can also inform the system when she is busy, and alerts from other patients can be sent to a back-up nurse.

Extension Healthcare can deliver messages to a range of devices, but the Vocera badge and smartphone app work particularly well with it because they can deliver contextual information instead of just an alert. Hospitals can define protocols stating that when certain types of devices deliver certain types of alerts, they should be accompanied by particular types of data (such as relevant vital signs). Extension Healthcare can gather and deliver the data, which the Vocera badge or smartphone app can then display.

Lang hopes the integrated systems can help the professionals prioritize their interventions. Nurses are interrupt-driven, and it’s hard for them to keep the most important tasks in mind–a situation that leads to burn-out. The solutions Vocera is putting together may significantly change workflows and improve care.

Locking Down Clinician Wi-Fi Use

Posted on November 1, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Now that Wi-Fi-based Internet connections are available in most public spaces where clinician might spend time, they have many additional opportunities to address emerging care issues on the road, be they with their family in a mall or a grabbing a burger at McDonald’s.

However, notes one author, there are many situations in which clinicians who share private patient data via Wi-Fi may be violating HIPAA rules, though they may not be aware of the risks they are taking. Not only can a doctor or nurse end up exposing private health information to the public, they can open a window to their EMR, which can violate countless additional patients’ privacy. Like traditional texting, standard Wi-Fi offers hackers an unencrypted data stream, and that puts their connected mobile device at risk if they’re not careful to take other precautions like a VPN.

According to Paul Cerrato, who writes on cybersecurity for iMedicalApps, Wi-Fi networks are by their design open. If the physician can connect to the network, hostile actors could connect to the network and in turn their device, which would allow them to open files, view the files and even download information to their own device.

It’s not surprising that physicians are tempted to use open public networks to do clinical work. After all, it’s convenient for them to dash off an email message regarding, say, a patient medication issue while having a quick lunch at a coffee shop. Doing so is easy and feels natural, but if the email is unsecured, that physician risks exposing his practice to a large HIPAA-related fine, as well as having its network invaded by intruders. Not only that, any HIPAA problem that arises can blacken the reputation of a practice or hospital.

What’s more, if clinicians use an unsecured public wireless networks, their device could also acquire a malware infection which could cause harm to both the clinician and those who communicate with their device.

Ideally, it’s probably best that physicians never use public Wi-Fi networks, given their security vulnerabilities. But if using Wi-Fi makes sense, one solution proposed by Cerrato is for physicians is to access their organization’s EMR via a Citrix app which creates a secure tunnel for information sharing.

As Cerrato points out, however, smaller practices with scant IT resources may not be able to afford deploying a secure Citrix solution. In that case, HHS recommends that such practices use a VPN to encrypt sensitive information being sent or received across the Wi-Fi network.

But establishing a VPN isn’t the whole story. In addition, clinicians will want to have the data on their mobile devices encrypted, to make sure it’s not readable if their device does get hacked. This is particularly important given that some data on their mobile devices comes from mobile apps whose security may not have been vetted adequately.

Ideally, managing security for clinician devices will be integrated with a larger mobile device management strategy that also addresses BYOD, identity and access management issues. But for smaller organizations (notably small medical groups with no full-time IT manager on staff) beginning by making sure that the exchange of patient information by clinicians on Wi-Fi networks is secured is a good start.

A Look At Vendor IoT Security And Vulnerability Issues

Posted on October 5, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Much of the time, when we discuss the Internet of Things, we’re looking at issues from an end-user perspective.  We talk about the potential for IoT options like mobile medical applications and wearable devices, and ponder how to connect smart devices to other nodes like the above to offer next-generation care. Though we’re only just beginning to explore such networking models, the possibilities seem nearly infinite.

That being said, most of the responsibility for enabling and securing these devices still lies with the manufacturers, as healthcare networks typically don’t integrate fully with IoT devices as of yet.

So I was intrigued to find a recent article in Dark Reading which lays out some security considerations manufacturers of IoT devices should keep in mind. Not only do the suggestions give you an idea of how vendors should be thinking about vulnerabilities, they also offer some useful insights for healthcare organizations.

Security research Lysa Myers offers IoT device-makers several recommendations to consider, including the following:

  • Notify users of any changes to device features. In fact, it may make sense to remind them repeatedly of significant changes, or they may simply ignore them out of habit.
  • Put a protocol in place for handling vulnerability reports, and display your vulnerability disclosure policy prominently on your website. Ideally, Myers notes, makers of IoT medical devices should send vulnerability reports to the FDA.
  • When determining how to handle a vulnerability issue, let the most qualified person decide what should happen. In the case of automated medical diagnosis, for example, the right person would probably be a doctor.
  • Make it quick and easy to update IoT device software when you find an error. Also, make it simple for customers to spot fraudulent updates.
  • Create an audit log for all devices, even those that might seem too mundane to interest criminals, as even the least important of devices can assist criminals in launching a DDoS attack or spamming.
  • See to it that users can tell when the changes made to an IoT device’s software are made by the authorized user or a designated representative rather than a cybercriminal or other inappropriate person.
  • Given that many IoT devices require cloud-based services to operate, it’s important to see that end users aren’t dropped abruptly with no cloud alternative. Manufacturers should give users time to transition their service if discontinuing a device, going out of business or otherwise ending support for their own cloud-based option.

If we take a high-level look at these recommendations, there’s a few common themes to be considered:

Awareness:  Particularly in the case of IoT devices, it’s critical to raise awareness among both technical staffers and users of changes, both in features and security configurations.

Protection:  It’s becoming more important every day to protect IoT devices from attacks, and see to it that they are configured properly to avoid security and continuity failures. Also, see to that these devices are protected from outages caused by vendor issues.

Monitoring:  Health IT leaders should find ways to integrate IoT devices into their monitoring routine, tracking their behavior, the state of security updates to their software and any suspicious user activity.

As the article suggests, IoT device-makers probably need to play a large role in helping healthcare organizations secure these devices. But clearly, healthcare organizations need to do their part if they hope to maintain these devices successfully as health IT models change.

Apple’s Healthcare Data Plans Become Clearer

Posted on October 3, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Though it’s not without competitors, I’d argue that Apple’s HealthKit has stood out since its inception, in part because it was relatively early to the game (mining patient-centered data) and partly because Apple products have a sexy reputation. That being said, it hasn’t exactly transformed the health IT industry either.

Now, though, with the acquisition of Gliimpse, a startup which pulls data from disparate EMRs into a central database, it’s become clearer what Apple’s big-picture goals are for the healthcare market – and if its business model works out they could indeed change health data industry.

According to a nifty analysis by Bloomberg’s Alex Webb, which quotes an Apple Health engineer, the technology giant hopes to see the health data business evolve along the lines of Apple’s music business, in which Apple started with a data management tool (the iPod) then built a big-bucks music platform on the device. And that sounds like an approach that could steal a move from many a competitor indeed.

Apple’s HealthKit splash
Apple made a big splash with the summer 2014 launch of HealthKit, a healthcare data integration platform whose features include connecting patient generated health data with traditional systems like the Epic EMR. It also attracted prominent partners like Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Ochsner Health System within a year or so of its kickoff.

Still, the tech giant has been relatively quiet about its big-picture vision for healthcare, leaving observers like yours truly wondering what was up. After all, many of Apple’s health data moves have been incremental. For example, a few months ago I noted that Apple had begun allowing users to store their EMR data directly in its Health app, using the HL7 CCD standard. While interesting, this isn’t exactly an earth-shattering advance.

But in his analysis — which makes a great deal of sense to me – Bloomberg’s Webb argues that Apple’s next act is to take the data it’s been exchanging with wearables and put it to better use. Apple’s long-awaited big idea is to turn Apple’s HealthKit into a system that can improve diagnoses, sources told Bloomberg.

Also, Apple intends to integrate health records as closely with its proprietary devices as possible, offering not only data collection but suggestions for better health in a manner that can’t be easily duplicated on Android platforms. As Webb rightly points out, such a move could undermine Google’s larger healthcare plans, by locking consumers into Apple technology and discouraging a switch to the Google Fit health tracking software.

Big vision, big questions
As we know, even a company with the reputation, cash and proprietary user base enjoyed by Apple is far from a shoo-in for consumer health data dominance. (Consider the fate of Microsoft HealthVault and Google Health.) Its previous successes have come, as noted, by creating a channel then dominating that channel, but there’s no guarantee it can pull off such a trick this time.

For one thing, the wearables market is highly fragmented, and Apple is far from being the leader. (According to one set of stats, Fitbit had 25.4% of the global wearables market as of Q2 ’16, Xiaomi 14%, and Apple just 7%.) That doesn’t bode well for starting a health tracker-based revolution.

On the other hand, though, Apple did manage to create and dominate a channel in the music business, which is also quite resistant to change and dominated by extremely entrenched powers that be. If any upstart healthcare player could make this happen, it’s probably Apple. It will be interesting to see whether Apple can work its magic once again.

Improving Clinical Workflow Can Boost Health IT Quality

Posted on August 18, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

At this point, the great majority of providers have made very substantial investments in EMRs and ancillary systems. Now, many are struggling to squeeze the most value out of those investments, and they’re not sure how to attack the problem.

However, according to at least one piece of research, there’s a couple of approaches that are likely to pan out. According to a new survey by the American Society for Quality, most healthcare quality experts believe that improving clinical workflow and supporting patients online can make a big diference.

As ASQ noted, providers are spending massive amounts of case on IT, with the North American healthcare IT market forecast to hit $31.3 by 2017, up from $21.9 billion in 2012. But healthcare organizations are struggling to realize a return on their spending. The study data, however, suggests that providers may be able to make progress by looking at internal issues.

Researchers who conducted the survey, an online poll of about 170 ASQ members, said that 78% of respondents said improving workflow efficiency is the top way for healthcare organizations to improve the quality of their technology implementations. Meanwhile, 71% said that providers can strengthen their health IT use by nurturing strong leaders who champion new HIT initiatives.

Meanwhile, survey participants listed a handful of evolving health IT options which could have the most impact on patient experience and care coordination, including:

  • Incorporation of wearables, remote patient monitoring and caregiver collaboration tools (71%)
  • Leveraging smartphones, tablets and apps (69%)
  • Putting online tools in place that touch every step of patient processes like registration and payment (69%)

Despite their promise, there are a number of hurdles healthcare organizations must get over to implement new processes (such as better workflows) or new technologies. According to ASQ, these include:

  • Physician and staff resistance to change due to concerns about the impact on time and workflow, or unwillingness to learn new skills (70%)
  • High cost of rolling out IT infrastructure and services, and unproven ROI (64%)
  • Concerns that integrating complex new devices could lead to poor interfaces between multiple technologies, or that haphazard rollouts of new devices could cause patient errors (61%)

But if providers can get past these issues, there are several types of health IT that can boost ROI or cut cost, the ASQ respondents said. According to these participants, the following HIT tools can have the biggest impact:

  • Remote patient monitoring can cut down on the need for office visits, while improving patient outcomes (69%)
  • Patient engagement platforms that encourage patients to get more involved in the long-term management of their own health conditions (68%)
  • EMRs/EHRs that eliminate the need to perform some time-consuming tasks (68%)

Perhaps the most interesting part of the survey report outlined specific strategies to strengthen health IT use recommended by respondents, such as:

  • Embedding a quality expert in every department to learn use needs before deciding what IT tools to implement. This gives users a sense of investment in any changes made.
  • Improving available software with easier navigation, better organization of medical record types, more use of FTP servers for convenience, the ability to upload records to requesting facilities and a universal notification system offering updates on medical record status
  • Creating healthcare apps for professional use, such as medication calculators, med reconciliation tools and easy-to-use mobile apps which offer access to clinical pathways

Of course, most readers of this blog already know about these options, and if they’re not currently taking this advice they’re probably thinking about it. Heck, some of this should already be old hat – FTP servers? But it’s still good to be reminded that progress in boosting the value of health IT investments may be with reach. (To get some here-and-now advice on redesigning EMR workflow, check out this excellent piece by Chuck Webster – he gets it!)

Vendors Bring Heart And Lung Sounds To EHR

Posted on June 3, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

In what they say is a first, a group of technology vendors has teamed up to add heart and lung sounds to an EMR. The current effort extends only to the drchrono EHR, but if this rollout works, it seems likely that other vendors will follow, as adding multimedia content to patient medical records is a very logical step.

Urgent care provider Direct Urgent Care, a Berkeley, CA-based urgent care provider with 30,000 patients, is rolling out the Eko Core Digital Stethoscope for use by physicians. The heart and lung sounds will be recorded by the digital stethoscope, then transmitted wirelessly to a phone- or tablet-based mobile app. The app, in turn, uploads the audio files to the drchrono HR.

Ordinarily, I’d see this as an early experiment in managing multimedia health data and leave it at that. But two things make it more interesting.

One is that the Eko Core sells for a relatively modest $299, which is not bad for an FDA-cleared device. (Eko also sells an attachment for $199 which digitizes and records sounds captured by traditional analog stethoscopes, as well as streaming those files to the Eko app.) The other is that the recorded sounds can be shared with remote specialists such as cardiologists and pulmonologists, which seems valuable on its face even if the data doesn’t get stored within an EMR.

Not only that, this rollout underscores a problem just been given too little attention. At present, what I’ve seen, few EMRs incorporated anything beyond text. Even radiology images, which have been digital for ages (and managed by sophisticated PACS platforms) typically aren’t accessible to the EMR interface. In fact, my understanding is that PACS data is another silo that needs to be broken down.

Meanwhile, medical practices and hospitals are increasingly generating data that doesn’t fit into the existing EMR template, from sources such as wearables, health apps and video consults. Neither EMR developers nor standards organizations seem to have kept up with the influx of emerging non-text data, so virtually none of it is being integrated into patient records yet.

In other words, not only is it interesting to note that an EMR vendor is incorporating audio into medical records, at a modest cost, it’s worth taking stock of what it can teach us about enriching digital patient records overall.

Eventually, after all, patients will be able to capture — with some degree of accuracy — multimedia content that includes not only audio, but also ultrasound recordings, EKG charts and more. Of course, these self-administered tests and will never replace a consult by a skilled clinician, but there certainly are situations in which this data will be relevant.

When you also bear in mind that the number of telemedicine consults being conducted is growing dramatically, and that these, too, offer insights that could become part of a patient’s chart, the need to go beyond text-based EMRs becomes even more evident.

So maybe the Eko/drchrono partnership will work out, and maybe it won’t. But what they’re doing matters nonetheless.

Galaxy Will See You Now

Posted on May 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

We all know how dramatic our lives have changed thanks to technology. Many of us remember the impact a computer in every home had on our lives. Now we’re seeing that same transformation happening as we all start carrying a smartphone in our pocket. Each of these technologies has opened up new worlds of possibilities in our personal lives and also for healthcare. I think we’ll see a similar transformation with the introduction of voice recognition and AI (Artificial Intelligence).

When we start talking about AI, most of us probably think about the movies they’ve seen where AI was on display. Hollywood’s use of AI in movies often makes it so it doesn’t feel very real. However, if you have a smartphone, then you’ve probably used AI. I know my first real experience with AI was on my Samsung Galaxy S3. I remember my wife and I going on a date and we spent the majority of our date asking “Galaxy” various questions. We got surprisingly good answers including easy access to the show times for the movie we ended up seeing.

Most of us have had this type of experience with AI on our smartphone. It’s pretty magical, but I must admit that I didn’t use it that often when it was just on my phone. There were a few cases it was really useful like when I was driving and needed directions to a gas station. The hands-free access to information was extremely powerful, but it wasn’t part of my daily experience. However, that changed for me when I introduced an always on AI solution in my home. Now it’s become a daily part of me and my family’s life.

How does this apply to healthcare? It’s becoming very clear that the home is the healthcare hub of the future. Think about having always on tablets, smart TVs, and other devices positioned throughout your home where you can easily access your health information, medical knowledge, and healthcare providers. That’s powerful. Plus, those devices and attached sensors are starting to easily monitor you, your environment, and your health. This two way connection creates an extremely powerful combination that will change the way we view healthcare.

Certainly there are practical examples of home health services that exist today including monitoring recently discharged patients, monitoring seniors, connecting patients with doctors, and much more. We’re seeing all of these connected home health services happen more and more every day. Just what we’ve already begun to implement will improve the healthcare we provide dramatically. However, we’re just starting to explore what AI and new technologies can do for healthcare. The best is still to come.

How long will it be before we can sit at home and we can ask our tablet or smart TV “Galaxy, how’s my blood pressure doing today?” Or “Galaxy, can you schedule me a telemedicine visit with my doctor to discuss my prescription refill?” Not to mention Galaxy proactively reaching out to you to motivate healthy decision making.

What’s so incredible is that executing these ideas and many more aren’t that farfetched given the powerful technology that exists today. We still need to connect a few dots, but it’s all extremely doable from a technical perspective.

What’s going to be harder is the cultural shift and change of mindset. However, that’s happening already and it will accelerate over time. I’m sure my kids wouldn’t think twice about asking our TV or tablet for a doctor’s appointment and then having the doctor streamed right to the TV or their tablet. They probably wonder why it’s not already possible.

Even while we wait for this more automated AI future, there are still big home health things happening on smartphones and tablets. Each of those things is a building block to this exalted future. I’m ready for Galaxy to see me now. In fact, in some ways he already does. Are you ready?

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Steps In Integrating Patient-Generated Health Data

Posted on May 24, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As the number of connected health devices in use has expanded, healthcare leaders have grappled with how to best leverage the data they generate. However, aside from a few largely experimental attempts, few providers are making active use of such data.

Part of the reason is that the connected health market is still maturing. With health tracking wearables, remote monitoring set-ups, mobile apps and more joining the chorus, it might be too soon to try and normalize all this data, much less harvest it for clinical use. Also, few healthcare organizations seem to have a mature strategy in place for digital health.

But technical issues may be the least of our problems. It’s important to note that providers have serious concerns around patient-generated health data (PGHD), ranging from questions about its validity to fears that such data will overwhelm them.

However, it’s possible to calm these fears, argues Christina Caraballo, senior healthcare strategist at Get Real Health.  Here’s her list of the top five concerns she’s heard from providers, with responses that may help put providers at ease:

  • Fear they’ll miss something in the flood of data. Add disclaimers, consent forms, video clips or easy-to-digest graphics clarifying what consumers can and can’t expect, explicitly limiting provider liability.
  • Worries over data privacy and security: Give consumers back some of the risk, by emphasizing that no medium is perfectly secure, including paper health records, and that they must determine whether the benefits of using digital health devices outweigh the risks.
  • Questions about data integrity and standardization: Emphasize that while the industry has made great process and standardization, interoperability, authentication, data provenance, reliability, validity, clinical value and even workflow, the bottom line is that the data still comes from patients, who don’t always report everything regardless of how you collect the data.
  • Concerns about impact on workflow: Underscore that if the data is presented in the right framework, it will be digestible in much the same way as other electronic medical data.
  • Resistance to pressure from consumers: Don’t demand that providers leverage PGHD out of the gate; instead, move incrementally into the PGHD management by letting patients collect data electronically, and then incorporate data into clinical systems once all stakeholders are on board.

Now, I’m not totally uncritical of Ms. Caraballo’s article. In particular, I take issue with her assertion that providers who balk at using PGHD are “naysayers” who “simply don’t want to change.” While there are always a few folks fitting this description in any profession, the concerns she outlines aren’t trivial, and brushing them off with vague reassurances won’t work.

Truthfully, if I were a provider I doubt I would be comfortable relying on PGHD, especially biometric data. As Ingrid Oakley-Girvan of Medable notes, wearables giant Fitbit was hit with a lawsuit earlier this year alleging that its heart rate monitoring technology is inaccurate, and I wouldn’t be surprised other such suits arise. Digital health trackers and apps have transitioned from novelty to quasi-official medical device very quickly — some might say too quickly – and being cautious about their output just makes sense.

Nonetheless, PGHD will play a role in patient care and management at some point in the future, and it makes sense to keep providers in the loop as these technologies progress. But rushing them into using such data would not be wise. Let’s make sure such technologies are vetted before they assume a routine role in care.

Managing Your Large Medical Equipment Purchases

Posted on May 3, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live video interview, you can find the recorded video here:

On Thursday, May 5, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT) join us for a live video interview with Nancy Hannan, Philips Relationship Director at Augusta University Health System (formerly known as Georgia Regents) where we’ll be discussing the unique approach Nancy and her team at Augusta University Health System have taken to acquisition and management of their large medical purchases through a unique alliance with Philips.
2016 May - Managing Your Large Medical Equipment Purchases-blog
The great part is that you can join my live conversation with Nancy and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask her questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Thursday, May 5, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 20-30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

We hope you’ll join us live or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation. Nancy has some really great insights to share from the unique alliance between Philips and Augusta University Health System. We’ll talk about the challenges they faced in managing and replacing old medical equipment and the proactive efforts they’re taking to ensure that their patients and providers are getting the highest quality, safest care possible.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Medical Device Security At A Crossroads

Posted on April 28, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As anyone reading this knows, connected medical devices are vulnerable to attacks from outside malware. Security researchers have been warning healthcare IT leaders for years that network-connected medical devices had poor security in place, ranging from image repository backups with no passwords to CT scanners with easily-changed configuration files, but far too many problems haven’t been addressed.

So why haven’t providers addressed the security problems? It may be because neither medical device manufacturers nor hospitals are set up to address these issues. “The reality is both sides — providers and manufacturers — do not understand how much the other side does not know,” said John Gomez, CEO of cybersecurity firm Sensato. “When I talk with manufacturers, they understand the need to do something, but they have never had to deal with cyber security before. It’s not a part of their DNA. And on the hospital side, they’re realizing that they’ve never had to lock these things down. In fact, medical devices have not even been part of the IT group and hospitals.

Gomez, who spoke with Healthcare IT News, runs one of two companies backing a new initiative dedicated to securing medical devices and health organizations. (The other coordinating company is healthcare security firm Divurgent.)

Together, the two have launched the Medical Device Cybersecurity Task Force, which brings together a grab bag of industry players including hospitals, hospital technologists, medical device manufacturers, cyber security researchers and IT leaders. “We continually get asked by clients with the best practices for securing medical devices,” Gomez told Healthcare IT News. “There is little guidance and a lot of misinformation.“

The task force includes 15 health systems and hospitals, including Children’s Hospital of Atlanta, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Beebe Healthcare and Intermountain, along with tech vendors Renovo Solutions, VMware Inc. and AirWatch.

I mention this initiative not because I think it’s huge news, but rather, as a reminder that the time to act on medical device vulnerabilities is more than nigh. There’s a reason why the Federal Trade Commission, and the HHS Office of Inspector General, along with the IEEE, have launched their own initiatives to help medical device manufacturers boost cybersecurity. I believe we’re at a crossroads; on one side lies renewed faith in medical devices, and on the other nothing less than patient privacy violations, harm and even death.

It’s good to hear that the Task Force plans to create a set of best practices for both healthcare providers and medical device makers which will help get their cybersecurity practices up to snuff. Another interesting effort they have underway in the creation of an app which will help healthcare providers evaluate medical devices, while feeding a database that members can access to studying the market.

But reading about their efforts also hammered home to me how much ground we have to cover in securing medical devices. Well-intentioned, even relatively effective, grassroots efforts are good, but they’re only a drop in the bucket. What we need is nothing less than a continuous knowledge feed between medical device makers, hospitals, clinics and clinicians.

And why not start by taking the obvious step of integrating the medical device and IT departments to some degree? That seems like a no-brainer. But unfortunately, the rest of the work to be done will take a lot of thought.