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6 Healthcare Incubators Growing the Future of HealthTech

Posted on October 30, 2014 I Written By

With the rapidly-growing demand for technologies that solve challenges for healthcare patients, professionals and institutions, many of the most innovative and disruptive solutions are coming not from large corporations, but small, scrappy startup companies.

With this trend has risen a group of startup “incubators” and “accelerators” specifically focused on healthcare technology entrepreneurs. These organizations serve as a launching pad for healthtech startups by facilitating high-value mentoring, collaboration and investor connections, plus basic needs like office infrastructure and seed funding.

For the startups, this gives them the time and resources to refine their technologies and services while finding investors and customers. Meanwhile the accelerators benefit by building local economies, solving healthcare challenges, and opening up highly-profitable opportunities for their backing investors

Below, we’ll introduce you to some of the leading incubators in the healthcare industry. These incubators have a proven track record in helping innovative young companies bring new ideas and services to consumers and businesses.

The Top-Six Healthcare Incubators and Accellerators

rockhealth

Rock Health – Rock Health invites early stage companies to work within the incubator and receive funding and mentorship from a variety of companies and health organizations. Rock Health notes that 18% of our economy is healthcare-based, but it’s one of the last industries to receive a tech makeover.  With more than 50 active startups in its portfolio, Rock Health is one of the most experienced healthcare incubators, especially for startups that focus on providing web services, mobile applications and SaaS solutions for healthcare providers and companies.

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Health Wildcatters – Health Wildcatters is a mentorship-driven healthcare seed accelerator in Dallas; slightly different than an incubator. Though similar to incubators in their goals, accelerators typically acquire a small amount of equity in a startup, then work quickly to help a company achieve a short-term goal like raising money or launching a product. While incubators house companies for months or years, accelerators like Health Wildcatters work in weeks. Health Wildcatters focuses mainly on early-stage healthcare technology startups, including IT, SaaS, digital health and mobile health companies. Companies receive an initial seed investment and a 12-week program in which Health Wildcatters works quickly to help the company build value and refine its product. The name “wildcatter” hearkens back to independent oil entrepreneurs who were willing to take risks in where they drilled. Health Wildcatters takes the same approach to finding companies. This entrepreneurial approach allows it to help more startups reach their goals.

startup-health

StartUp Health –Chaired by TimeWarner CEO Jerry Levin, this incubator aims to fund 1,000 healthcare companies within the next decade to help transform the face of the healthcare industry. StartUp Health works to build sustainable growth in its companies over a three-year period. During the incubation period, StartUp Health matches companies with a network of more than 10,000 health professionals and business people focused on improving digital health and wellness.

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The Iron Yard – With its first location in Asheville, NC, the Iron Yard is growing a network of incubators focused on growing new areas of technology like digital health, green tech and emerging technologies. Its digital health accelerator, located in Spartanburg, SC, is working to turn one of the nation’s oldest railroad junctions into a hub for digital health innovation. The Iron Yard offers startups $20,000 in seed capital and three months of mentorship and workshops from experts in design, development and financing. The Iron Yard also offers training in web development and programming to place graduates with the startup companies it supports.

blueprint-health

Blueprint Health – Blueprint Health, located in New York City, is one of the largest incubators in any niche and offers an expansive network of healthcare mentors to assist healthcare entrepreneurs launch new ventures. Blueprint Health focuses on companies developing tech projects directly for hospitals, physicians and health plans rather than consumer-facing applications, which means deeper access to established customers. In 2013, Blueprint Health focused its efforts on mature startups companies. While many incubators assist early-stage companies, more than half of Blueprint’s mentees already had paying customers. With more than 12,000 sq. ft. of space and two classes per year, Blueprint Health is able to help more than 100 healthcare companies each year.

healthbox

Healthbox –  Healthbox offers accelerator programs in Boston, Chicago, Tampa, London, Nashville and Salt Lake City that provide  digital health entrepreneurs with funding and access to a global network of healthcare investors and providers. Healthbox launched its first accelerator program in Chicago in 2012 and quickly grew to other states and the UK. It recently expanded its business programs with $7 million in funding and started a program that helps hospitals create their own in-house Healthbox accelerator programs that, in turn, help companies gain traction within their own medical communities. So far, Healthbox has invested in 56 active startups, supported by a network of more than 350 expert mentors.

About the Author: David Vogel is a blogger for Datapipe, a leading provider of HIPAA-compliant hosting and managed cloud hosting. Connect with David on Twitter (@DavidVogelDotCo) and Google+ (+David Vogel).

7 Health Tech Accelerators You Should Know About

Posted on November 6, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

You don’t have to look far to find a health IT accelerator. At least, not as far as you used to.

Programs to give healthcare entrepreneurs a boost are appearing throughout the country, providing opportunities for innovators who don’t live in a major tech hub — and don’t want to move to one.

Here are a few accelerator programs to know about, with special attention to those away from the coasts:

  • The Iron Yard is based in Spartanburg, S.C., and seeks companies involved in areas such as wellness apps and enterprise software. It provides $20,000 in seed capital and three months of mentoring and workshops in areas such as fundraising, user interface development and lean startup methodology.
  • Healthbox is operating programs in Chicago, Nashville and Jacksonville, Fla., in addition to Boston and London. (OK, technically, Jacksonville is on the East Coast, but still.) It’s a four-month program that provides startups with $50,000 in seed capital along with office space, mentoring and training. Healthbox asks for 7 percent in equity. According to the accelerator’s website: “Competitive applicants will address a specific and pressing challenge in the healthcare industry. For example, solutions of interest may improve patient engagement, provider effectiveness or preventative health and wellness.”
  • DreamIt Health started in Philadelphia and has expanded to Austin and Baltimore. The Baltimore version, which will last four months, is selecting as many as 10 firms from around the world and offering as much as $50,000 in stipend money and professional services. Applicants should be “working to use IT to solve significant industry problems faced by key healthcare stakeholders including providers, payers, public health, biopharma, device makers, employers and patients themselves.”
  • The Sprint Accelerator, powered by Techstars, is a program launching in Kansas City with a focus on mobile health technology. The three-month intensive mentorship program will begin in March, with startups receiving as much as $120,000, including $20,000 in seed funding and an optional $100,000 convertible debt note.
  • Health Wildcatters is a new accelerator in Dallas that invests as much as $35,000 in each firm. It’s open to a broader range of startups than some of the other programs, stating on its website: “Many healthcare IT, SaaS, digital health and mobile health companies are a fit, but we also encourage medical device, diagnostic and even pharma companies to apply.” Wildcatters takes an 8 percent equity stake. The site explains that in Texas parlance, wildcatters are “independent oil entrepreneurs willing to take chances with regard to where they drill” and that their success comes from “low operating costs and the ability to mobilize quickly.”
  • XLerateHealth runs a 10-week program in Louisville, Ky. Selected teams get a $20,000 stipend and donated professional services worth an estimated $50,000. The goal is to “help early stage healthcare companies build out their commercialization strategy, which includes their intersection with Payers, Providers (hospitals, ACOs, nursing homes, home health and group practices), and customers (employers and/or consumers).” XLerateHealth receives a 6 percent equity stake.
  • Innov8 for Health operates several programs in Cincinnati. This month it’s holding a Health Startup Showcase in which firms present their solutions to entrepreneurs, potential customers and investors and compete for $5,000 in cash and in-kind services. Last year it helped to launch seven companies in a 12-month accelerator program providing each firm with $20,000 in seed funding.

There are, of course, plenty of other programs. Paul Sonnier has compiled a more comprehensive list at Story of Digital Health.

With the rise of open platforms and the growing number of support networks, health IT entrepreneurship has become a viable career option for many.

And, now more than ever, it’s possible to innovate close to home.

For Health IT Opportunities, Look to the Chaos

Posted on October 9, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

Sunnie Southern, founder and CEO of Viable Synergy, spends her days pushing for health IT innovation. Her firm provides products and consulting services for commercialization and community engagement. One of its best-known projects is Innov8 for Health, a Cincinnati-based tech accelerator. Southern, a registered dietitian who started her firm in 2010, talked about her work and about EMRs — as they are and as they could be.

Sunnie Southern

What does Viable Synergy do?

Viable Synergy specializes in commercializing assets that transform health. It offers consulting services and proprietary products that support the development and deployment of innovative health solutions from concept to customer. This year and next, Viable Synergy is focused on the institutional market by helping hospitals and provider organizations to generate new (non-clinical) revenue from currently available assets.

You are part of the Health Data Consortium. What is that?

The Health Data Consortium is a collaboration among government, non-profit and private sector organizations working to foster the availability and innovative use of data to improve health and health care.

Viable Synergy leads the Ohio Affiliate of the Health Data Consortium through our Innov8 for Health program. HDC Affiliates host events and build local networks of groups including startups, entrepreneurs, health companies, universities, government agencies and other innovators to create an ecosystem around using open data to improve health outcomes for individuals and communities.

Do you think EMRs are reaching their potential in improving health?

We are at the very beginning of a new era of leveraging technology to improve health and care and reduce costs. EHRs are an essential component of gaining access to health data to make better decisions.

What is missing from the equation?

Time. We need time to bring the plans to fruition to increase engagement and activation.

The essential elements are in place:

  • Standards that provide direction on necessary features and now interoperability/accessibility (MU2)
  • Incentives to increase purchase, implementation and meaningful use
  • Awareness within the health care community and beyond about the importance of ensuring that providers and patients have access to the critical information they need to make informed decisions

What goals do you think we should be prioritizing in health IT right now?

Interoperability, integration and convergence. There are so many places that providers and patients must go to access critical information that it is difficult to get a complete picture of a patient’s history or a physician’s patient population. I hope that we will begin to see tools that allow for data to be aggregated from multiple sources and provided in an easily consumable fashion. We’ll also need the appropriate regulations to secure and support the aggregation.

What’s the most exciting thing you see happening in health IT at the moment?

The whole system is being turned inside out and upside down. Everyone across the health care continuum is focusing on how to perform their role better. Innovative solutions are popping up everywhere. The chaos is creating massive opportunities. We really have a chance to make a difference. I believe it is the best time ever to be an entrepreneur in health care. So glad to be a part of it!

These 5 Innovative Companies Are Cause for Health IT Hope

Posted on October 1, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

When the topic is health IT, it’s easy to get caught up in discussing the major EMR players.

And because of Meaningful Use, there’s a tendency for everyone to do the same things — even if they go about it in different ways. Whether you’re a giant like Epic, an upstart like Kareo or a specialty firm like the gastroenterology-focused gMed, you’re likely making sure, for example, that your customers will be able to exchange structured care summaries with other providers and with patients.

But there’s still plenty of innovation in health IT, much of it with little or no connection to MU2 or other federal requirements. Startups all over the country are trying to improve lives through more efficient collection and use of data.

Here’s a sampling of startups and specific innovations:

  • HealthLandscape. This Cincinnati-based firm markets a mapping application that lets you input data from a variety of sources. The idea is to better understand health information by visualizing it. The company is a subsidiary of the nonprofit Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati, which worked with the American Association of Family Physicians and the Robert Graham Center to develop the platform.
  • SwiftPayMD. This iPhone and iPad app from Atlanta-based Iconic Data allows physicians to note diagnostic and billing codes by voice right after seeing a patient. I have to admit, when I stopped to think about it, I was surprised that doctors couldn’t already do this. The major selling point: It helps practices to get paid as much as two weeks sooner.
  • Vivify Health. Based in Plano, Texas, this startup has created a cloud-based platform for monitoring and testing patients remotely. Its system works with just about any consumer mobile device to provide customized care plans, coaching, educational videos and interactive video conferencing. In a press release, Vivify Health said it’s helping hospitals, home health agencies, payers and others to reduce readmissions, manage chronic diseases and improve care transitions. It received funding this year from Ascension Health Ventures and Heritage Group.
  • Drchrono. This Mountain View, Calif.-based company bills its flagship product as “the original mobile EHR built for the iPad.” It was part of the Y Combinator, a Mountain View-based seed accelerator, in 2011. Drchrono in 2012 raised $2.8 million in funding led by venture capitalist Yuri Milner.
  • Doc Halo. This firm, based in Cincinnati, makes possible HIPAA-secure texting. (If this list seems slightly Cincinnati-centric, it’s because I worked in the city for eight years and know the market better than I know others.) Many doctors use regular text messaging to discuss patient information, but they shouldn’t. Doc Halo’s mobile app system uses several levels of encryption.

These are just a few projects that I thought were cool. Based on what they’re doing, there’s plenty to be hopeful about in health IT. There are, of course, many other firms equally worthy of mention. And there are now accelerator programs all over the country specifically for health IT startups.

I often get the feeling that the federal government’s involvement is taking the joy out of health IT. That’s not the case, but amid the push to meet MU2 requirements, you might have to look a little harder to find it.

And with these startups, here it is.

Disclosure: gMed and DrChrono are both advertisers on this site.

Patient Portal, HIE Policy, and Portable Technologies — #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on October 6, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: How would you make a business case to leaders of an organization for a basic patient portal? 

 

 

 

Topic Two: What should an HIE policy regarding information sharing consent include? Can other technologies help? 

 

 

 

Topic Three: Why are portable technologies being adopted at a quicker rate than other health IT?

 

 

 

Topic Four: Free for All: What other health IT news/issues have interested you most this past week? 

 

 

EHR Reimbursement, Health Data Security, and Innovation – #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on September 22, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Every week, HL7 Standards, hosts a #HITsm Tweet Chat and poses four questions “on current topics that are influencing healthcare technology, health IT, and the use of social media in healthcare.” It’s always a great discussion and also a great chance to meet a wide variety of people that are passionate about healthcare IT.

In case you missed it, or are curious about what went on this week, we’ve put together the list of topics with some of the best responses for each topic. There were some interesting topics this week, as well as some great responses. If you have any opinions on any of these topics, feel free to continue the discussion in the comments. This chats take place every Friday at 11AM CST. You’ll find members of Healthcare Scene regularly participating in the chat under some of the following Twitter accounts: @techguy@ehrandhit@hospitalEHR, and @smyrnagirl.

Topic One: Politics #EHR reimbursement will likely reach $20 billion. Why is this big govt initiative exempt from critics?

Topic Two: Health data security: What does health data security look like and how is it different than financial data security?

Topic Three: Clash of the #Health IT Titans: What is most beneficial patients, #HIEs or #ACOs? 

Topic Four: Innovation in #healthIT: What are some examples of innovative groups/ideas that may disrupt the current system? 

#NHITWeek Blog Carnival – How Will Health IT Make a Difference a Year from Now at the Next National Health IT Week?

Posted on September 4, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those of you that don’t know, National Health IT Week (NHITWeek) is just around the corner (September 10-14, 2012 for those keeping track at home). As part of NHITWeek, HIMSS has put together a blog carnival where anyone who has a passion for healthcare IT can write a blog post answering the question, “How Will Health IT Make a Difference a Year from Now at the Next National Health IT Week?

EHR Market
2013 is going to be an extremely important year for healthcare IT and in particular EHR. 2013 will be final year for a whole lot of EHR companies. With meaningful use stage 2 now on the table, many EHR companies will see the writing on the wall and realize that they weren’t able to build an EHR company. Plus, another major threat to small EHR companies is the ongoing acquisition of the independent medical practice by hospitals. This will likely put many EHR companies out of business in 2013.

This move will make a huge difference in the EHR market. We currently have 600+ EHR companies vying for physicians attention. While competition can be a great thing, this much competition often leaves doctors confused and on the EHR sidelines.

HIE Market
I predict that 2013 will bring together the first active, well adopted HIE. I’m still not sure which HIE is going to be the successful one, but I believe that one of the HIE’s will get that distinction in 2013. Unfortunately, at the same time we’re going to see many other HIE’s close up shop. Hopefully this will help us draw a clear distinction about what makes a successful HIE and what doesn’t.

Mobile Health Market
In 2013 I expect we’ll see a plethora of new health monitoring devices. I don’t believe we’ll see any of these devices see mainstream adoption in 2013, but the early adopter phase for many of these devices will start in 2013 and doctors will start to run into questions about how to integrate the data these devices collect into their clinical practices.

Doctors will face a really tough challenge as none of these devices will have mainstream adoption. So, one day a patient will come in with data from one device and the next day the patient will arrive with similar data from a different device. How a physician handles this data will the challenging questions of 2013.

Outside of medical monitoring devices, we’re going to see widespread adoption of mobile health apps related to medication compliance. Much of this work will be funded on the backs of pharma, but we’ll also see related applications related to other medical compliance as well (ie. diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, etc).

Health IT Entrepreneurship
2013 will be the year of the Health IT Entrepreneur. I expect looking back 10 years from now, we’ll see dozens of the most influential Health IT companies were started in 2013. Many parts of healthcare are ready for a change and a surprising number of investors are interested in healthcare IT. Add into that mix the large number of healthcare IT incubators and accelerator programs and it is easy to see how health IT is about to get an influx of health IT entrepreneurs.

I am interested to watch how these new to healthcare entrepreneurs adapt to many of the challenging dynamics that exist in healthcare. I’m certain that many underestimate the power of the healthcare “machine” and the challenge to change its direction. However, that might be just what healthcare IT needs.

EHR Mouseclicks, #HIT100 Interview, EMR and Doctor-Patient Relationships, and Sleep Rate: Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on July 29, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

I apologize for not having a weekly round-up last week — my family and I were in Southern Colorado, and while the owner of the lodge we were staying at said there was Internet available, that didn’t prove to be completely true. So for the next two weeks, these posts will have a combination of two weeks’ of posts. There were some great posts recently, and I’d hate for anyone to miss them!

EMR and EHR

Too Many EHR Mouseclicks and Keystrokes – A Solution for EHR Vendors

Critics of EHRs claim that there are too many mouseclicks/keystrokes involved to consider it efficient. However, there are ways to overcome this complaint. If vendors would focus on making their product respond consistently, and physicians get the training they need, this hurdle can be overcome. It may take awhile for this point to be reached, but it is possible.

EMR Advocate Tops the #HIT100

The #HIT100 list aims to recognize great #HITsm and #HealthIT communities on Twitter. This week, the #1 person on the list, Linda Stotsky (@EMRAnswers), was interviewed by Jennifer Dennard. She gives her thoughts on social media and health IT, and how it’s affected her career. Stotsky also reflects on the the value that the #HIT100 list brings to the health care community.

The Intersection of EMRs and Health Information Management

While researching for a discussion she was going to moderate on the exchange of personal health information with an ACO at Healthport’s first HIM Educational Summit, Jennifer Dennard stumbled upon some interesting information. This post contains some of her thoughts, and includes a list of the top 10 trends impacting HIM in 2016. At the conclusion of her article, she asks questions concerning Meaningful Use and the relationship HIM professionals have with EMR counterparts.

Happy EMR Doctor

How an EMR Gets in the Way of Doctor-Patient Relationships

While happy with his current EMR, Dr. Michael West talks about the “darkside” of EMRs. He says that he has to pay more attention to his computer than maintaining eye contact with his patients, but this is a problem that will be difficult to resolve. Although he could just jot notes down and update the EMR later, he feels this would be more time consuming and less accurate. Is there are a solution to the barrier created between doctors and patients when an EMR is used?

Smart Phone Health Care

SleepRate: Improves Your Sleep by Monitoring Your Heart

Everyone has trouble sleeping every now and then. Unfortunately, it’s not always easy to figure out why. SleepRate, a cloud based mobile service, may be the solution. This service tracks and analyzes the users sleep patterns, and, from that information, gives suggestions on how to improve sleep. It does this by monitoring your heart using a ECG.

App Helps Potential Skin Care Victims Track Moles

1 in 5 Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their life. With a chance this high of getting this terrible disease, it’s more important than ever to monitor moles and other skin lesions. An app created by the University of Michigan Health System, UMSkinCheck, makes that monitoring easier. The app sends reminders about skin checks, and allows the user

EMR Thoughts
Digital Health Takes Off in 2012

Digital Health is growing more and more. Rock Health Weekly reported that there is 73 percent more funding for it this year than at this time last year. The yearly funding report by Rock Health Weekly was recently released, and there were several interesting findings in it. Digital Health isn’t going anywhere.

Hospital EMR and EHR

The Meaningful Use Song (To The Tune of “Modern Major General”)

If you need a little pick-me up, or a smile to end your week, don’t miss this video. The “Meaningful Use Song” includes commentary on MU, written by Peggy Polaneczky, MD, to a catch tune.

From The Horse’s Mouth: What Scribes Are For

Ever wonder what a scribe does, and if they are really even needed? This post includes quotes from Scott Hagood, the director of business development for PhysAssist Scribes. This is a great position for pre-med students, and with the growth of EMR, the field for scribes continues to develop and expand as well.

Great Digital Health Conference in New York City

Posted on July 13, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As many of you know, last year I made the trip to New York City for the Digital Health Conference. You can see my Digital Health Conference Twitter round up from 2011 to get a feel for the conference. It’s a great event put together by the New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC).

I’m really excited to be able to attend the conference again in 2012. The 2012 Digital Health Conference is happening October 15-16, 2012 in New York, NY.

They’ve announced 2 keynote speakers: David J. Brailer, MD, Ph.D., Chairman, Health Evolution Partners and Stephen J. Dubner, Bestselling Author, Freakonomics and Superfreakonomics. As most of you know, I love hearing from former government health IT leaders, like David Brailer, once they’re out of that position. They can provide insights that they couldn’t say when working for the government. Plus, Freakonomics is just awesome. I’m excited to see Stephen Dubner speak in person.

I’ve also been asked to be part of a Healthcare Social Media panel at the conference that will include Brian Ahier, Ed Bennett, and Amy Dixon. I know Brian Ahier quite well (he moderated my HIMSS panel), but I only know of Ed Bennett and Amy Dixon. I think that often leads to the best panels since you get a number of varied viewpoints. Plus, you all know I love to talk about social media.

I’m also really excited to hear more about NYeC’s work with HIE, RECs and even a healthcare IT accelerator. It will be really interesting to get a perspective from an organization that is working in so many areas I love. I think their accelerator is fascinating and could produce some amazing results.

The organizers of the Digital Health Conference have provided a discount code for Healthcare Scene readers that provides you a 20% registration discount. All you need to do is enter the code HCS when you register.

The hash tag for the event is #DHC12 for those of you not able to attend, but want to follow the conference remotely.

While I love the healthcare IT super conferences, I also love going to a high quality conference like the Digital Health Conferences where you get a chance to dig in deep with a lot of the attendees. I love the depth and variety that I got at last year’s conference and I expect to get the same this year. Plus, I’ve already heard of a number of amazing people that are planning to attend.

If you plan to go, I’d love to know so we can meet. Maybe we’ll have to put together another Tweetup!

UPDATE: @healthcarewen took the initiative and put together a tweetup.

Mobile Health App Investments, Controlling Dreams With Remee: This Week in Healthcare Scene

Posted on June 24, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

While it was quiet around Healthcare Scene this week, there were still some great posts on a few of the websites. Be sure to check these articles out:

EMR and EHR

VC Firms Eyeing Mobile Health App Investments

It’s no secret that the Mobile Health App industry has taken off lately. Because of this, VC firms are more interested in investing in these companies. Anne Zeiger predicts there will be a handful of investments in the industry in the coming future. This post talks about different mobile health apps being created, and where the industry seems to be headed.

“Non Structured Data Is More Valuable to Practitioners Than Discrete Research Oriented Data” 

The title of this post was inspired by a comment on John’s recent post on the EHR Bubble. Here, John discusses the advantages of non-structured data for a physician. Does non-structured data help improve the quality of care? Join the debate over at EMR and EHR this week.

Smart Phone Health Care

Control Your Dreams With the Remee Sleep Mask

If you’re like me, I’ve always wished I could dictate what I was going to dream about. The latest product from Bitbanger Labs claims to do just that. The “Remee Lucid Dreaming Mask”, with practice, apparently gives the user the ability to control their dreams. The mask brings you into the “lucid dreaming” stage, which is a more aware state of dreaming. For only $95, this new product is available for pre-order here.

Go From Couch Potato to Runner with Couch-to-5K App

A program developed a few years ago has been the catalyst behind several mobile apps. The premise behind the program is to get couch potatoes (or just about anyone) running either a 5K or for 30 minutes straight in as little as 9 week. There are a variety of apps available to help wannabe-runners get started. This post gives a general overview of the official C25K app.