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The Benefits of Real-Time Locating Systems in Healthcare

Posted on November 16, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Stephanie Andersen, Managing Partner at ZulaFly.
Stephanie Andersen
“It is frustrating to not be able to find things you need when you need them.”

This is a recurring theme from professionals I interact with across the entire healthcare spectrum.

The healthcare industry is a setting where assets are seemingly in constant motion. With this movement comes increased possibility for assets to be misplaced or leave the building, creating unnecessary replacement expense that can negatively affect your organization’s bottom line.

Real-Time Locating System, or RTLS, has been on the scene as a dependable solution to tag and locate important, valuable assets that easily go missing and has increasingly become more important to a hospital’s bottom line.

Stop Replacing, Start Locating

Where are assets and how are they being utilized? RTLS answers this question in ways no other technology has been able to before.

In my conversations with healthcare leaders, many express concern over how often valuable assets walk out the door. RTLS possesses the strength to know if assets are moving at hours or in areas they should not be, as well as when assets reach the door.

In the healthcare industry, assets such as PSA and infusion pumps, beds, wound vacs, ventilators, Doppler systems, and workstations on wheels are just a few items staff members are tagging and keeping closer tabs on thanks to RTLS.

Staff can also use RTLS to evaluate whether an asset should be moved from one area to the next to increase utilization, compared to simply buying another one.

As a whole, replacement costs are reduced and the amount of dollars sunk into unused or forgotten rental equipment becomes remedied thanks to RTLS.

At ZulaFly, I am often asked if there is a way for hospitals to track ambulances and other care transport vehicles so that hospitals can have a 360 degree view of what is happening inside and outside of the facility. We have developed a GPS offering that combines with RTLS to create this comprehensive view.

Increased Staff and Patient Safety

A quality RTLS system gives staff members a device that allows them to easily call for help in real-time.

Additionally, RTLS affords patients a button-press solution in case of an emergency. Because the RTLS tag allows staff to quickly locate where the issue is occurring, the situation can be quickly attended to and remedied.

Industry leaders are seeing the value of RTLS within their healthcare facilities, quickly realizing how reduced replacement cost and time saved searching for assets create considerable return on investment.

About Stephanie Andersen
Stephanie Andersen is a 17+ year professional within the software industry, spending over ten of those years working at Microsoft. Through various roles and responsibilities that range from technical support, to project management, to driving sales, to business operations and even product development, Stephanie has become focused on sales, marketing, and business development. This strong skillset and unparalleled experience has been key in developing the go-to market strategy that has brought ZulaFly from concept to completion, and most recently to market.

John Doerr’s Excitement for Digital Health

Posted on September 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

John Doerr, a venture capitalist in many of the most famous tech companies, was onstage at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference where he was asked which of his latest investments he was most excited in. He replied that his most exciting investment was still in stealth mode, but that it was a healthcare startup and that “They aim to do for healthcare what Google did for health.”

Here’s the video of John Doerr talking about this investment and investing in healthcare:

I always love when billionaires like John Doerr are spending some of their time focused on healthcare. Certainly many of them have underestimated the complexity of healthcare and the entrenched system. Certainly many of them have made some bad investments. However, I think the more entrepreneurs and investors that focus on improving healthcare the better. So, I’m pleased he’s spending some time and energy with healthcare.

As for this company in stealth mode, I’m pretty sure Wolters Kluwer might argue that they’ve been doing that with health information for a long time. It will be interesting to see what a new startup tries to offer when it comes to making the world’s health knowledge available in a consumable format.

ePrescribing of Controlled Substance (EPCS) Now Allowed Nationwide

Posted on September 1, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is really exciting news. Especially for me since the only post I’ve ever taken down after it was published was a post I did about an FDA pilot of controlled substances on September 13, 2009. It turns out the press release I got was premature and so I took down the post since it wasn’t accurate information. About 6 years later (technically the DEA first proposed the rule in 2008), we finally have ePrescribing of controlled substance available in all 50 states.

Surescripts put together this great animated gif to celebrate the occasion.

We still have some work to do to get every doctor on board with ePrescribing, let alone ePrescribing controlled substances, but we’re getting there. In fact, I suggested today at me EHR workshop in Dubai that ePrescribing has been one of the most successful standards in healthcare. Can you think of any other healthcare standard that’s been more successful? HL7 lab data comes close, but I still take ePrescribing.

How long until we have near 100% adoption of ePrescibing? Any predictions?

Dropout Docs – The Answer for #HealthIT Startups?

Posted on July 23, 2015 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin is a true believer in #HealthIT, social media and empowered patients. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He currently leads the marketing efforts for @PatientPrompt, a Stericycle product. Colin’s Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung

We’d like to welcome a new guest blogger to our ranks. If you’re on social media, you probably know Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung), Co-Host of #hcldr. Colin is also head of Marketing for @PatientPrompt, a product offered by Stericycle Communication Solutions. We look forward to many posts from Colin in the future.

Recently both Nick van Terheyden (@drnic1) and Mandi Bishop (@MandiBPro) shared a link to an interesting article via Facebook. “Dropout Docs: Bay Area Doctors Quit Medicine to Work for Digital Health Startups”.
Dropout Doctors - Bay Area Doctors Leave Medicine for Healthcare Startups
The article highlights a new phenomenon happening In the Bay area – would-be doctors are dropping out of prestigious medical schools to pursue careers in digital health. Even those that complete their schooling are opting to join digital health start-ups/incubators (like Rock Health located in San Francisco, very close to USCF Medical Center) rather than apply for residency.

Being a doctor or a surgeon was once the pinnacle of achievement in American society, but with changes to reimbursements and general healthcare frustration, many are not seeing the practice of medicine as the rosy utopia it used to be (or was it ever?). Now even physicians are succumbing to the siren call of #HealthIT where there is a chance to “do good” and make a difference on a large scale.

I believe this trend could be a good thing for #HealthIT. Having more peers who are enthusiastic and passionate about improving healthcare can lead to more positive innovations. Consider the following quote from a doctor who joined a health care company instead of practicing medicine (from the KQED article):

“I realized that the system isn’t designed for doctors to make the real change you would like to for the patient.”

Having more people who want to put the patient at the center of healthcare makes my #HealthIT heart race. You can’t teach people to have this inner fire. It is something that is intrinsic to the individual…and we need more peers in #HealthIT with this flame.

There is just one line from the article that don’t agree with:

“…dropout doctors are well-positioned for a career in digital health as they have an insider’s view of the industry – and ideas about how to fix it.”

I think it is a bit of a stretch to say that people who went through med-school have a true “insider’s view”. Having not worked in a practice or in a healthcare setting, they would not be familiar with the political, financial or workflow aspects of care on the front lines. I hope these doc-dropouts are humble enough to remain open-minded as they listen to real-life customers provide feedback on the technologies and solutions they are involved with. In fact, dropout docs would be well served by remembering one particular part of their medical training – truly listening to the patient – which in this case may be the entirety of healthcare.

Telemedicine Startup Offers Providers A Shot At Equity

Posted on April 22, 2015 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Over the last couple of years, the number of telemedicine vendors out there fighting for business has exploded.  These include DoctoronDemand, GoTelecare, HealthTap, MDLIVE, American Well and many, many more.

Health plans are jumping on the bandwagon too. For example, United Healthcare  has been running a popular national television campaign advertising its “virtual clinic” services. UHC is my plan, so I can attest that this service — shown as embedded in its member site — hasn’t been rolled out yet, but that only makes its desire to get out in front of the trend more noteworthy.

Telemedicine models in play include companies that recruit providers and sell them to consumers, vendors who enable telemedicine via proprietary platforms and firms that lead with community building. At present the direct-to-consumer players seem to be somewhat ahead, simply because they’ve already begun developing a national brand, but the story doesn’t end there.

Though consumer-facing telemedicine companies probably have a viable business model, they’ll have to build a memorable consumer brand to make it, something that takes a great deal of  time and money.  On the other hand, vendors that offer white-label telemedicine technology to hospitals and health plans have at least as much to gain, without having to win the loyalty of fickle consumers.

One telemedicine player doing just that is Nashville-based PointNurse, which has developed a distributed collaboration and communications platform providers can use to deliver telemedicine services. I just spoke to CEO Cyrus Maaghul, who gave me a company overview, and was interested to hear that his venture is taking things in some new directions.

PointNurse is different than most companies in the telemedicine space for a few reasons.

For one thing, the platform includes block chain capabilities, which allow providers to accumulate credits for both community participation and actual care delivery. (In case you aren’t familiar with block chain technology, which powers crypto currency Bitcoin, you may want to click here.)

These credits aren’t just for fun. Eventually, when providers accumulate enough credits, they get a pro-rata share of a dedicated pool of equity.

Consumers, for their part, are given a multi-signature wallet which stores both their personal and clinical information, resulting more or less in a PHR with added capabilities. PointNurse hasn’t yet devised a way to share the data with provider EMRs, but that’s a short-term goal.

A wide range of providers can participate in PointNurse, including not only MDs but also nurse practitioners, pharmacists, RNs, LPNs and elder advocates.

A sister venture, HealthCombix, will license the technology underlying PointNurse to hospitals and payers. HealthCombix will provide APIs and tools to build their own distributed applications.

As Maaghul sees it, it’s critical for providers to realize more than a short-term benefit from participating in telemedicine. “I wanted to make providers feel highly motivated — that they can gain from this [arrangement],” Maaghul said. “This creates value for the patient.”

Of course, there’s no proof yet that this or any particular telemedicine business model is going to capture its market niche.  In fact, it’s not even clear what niches will emerge in this space; after all, though it’s moving fast it’s far from mature.

That being said, this approach has some intriguing aspects. I’ll be interested to see whether its business model and and unusual underlying technology work out.

The Fundamental Challenge of Building a Healthcare-Provider Focused Startup

Posted on March 6, 2015 I Written By

Kyle is CoFounder and CEO of Pristine, a VC backed company based in Austin, TX that builds software for Google Glass for healthcare, life sciences, and industrial environments. Pristine has over 30 healthcare customers. Kyle blogs regularly about business, entrepreneurship, technology, and healthcare at

Over the past few years, the government imposed copious regulations on healthcare providers, most of which are supposed to reduce costs, improve access to care, and consumerize the patient experience. Prior to 2009, the federal government was far less involved in driving the national healthcare agenda, and thus provider IT budgets, innovation, and research and development agendas among healthcare IT vendors.

This is, in theory (and according to the government), a good idea. Prior to the introduction of the HITECH act in 2009, IT adoption in healthcare was abysmal. The government has most certainly succeeded in driving IT adoption in the name of the triple aim. But this has two key side effects that directly impact the rate at which innovation can be introduced into the healthcare provider community.

The first side effect of government-driven innovation is that all of the vendors are building the exact same features and functions to adhere to the government requirements. This is the exact antithesis of capitalism, which is designed to allow companies to innovate on their own terms; right now, every healthcare IT vendor is innovating on the government’s terms. This is massively inefficient at a macroeconomic level, and stifles experimentation and innovation, which is ultimately bad for providers and patients.

But the second side effect is actually much more nuanced and profound. Because the federal government is driving an aggressive health IT adoption schedule, healthcare providers aren’t experimenting as much as they otherwise would. Today, the greatest bottleneck to providers embarking on a new project is not money, brain power, or infrastructure. Rather, providers are limited in their ability to adopt new technologies by their bandwidth to absorb change. It is simply not possible to undertake more than a handful of initiatives at one time; management can’t coordinate the projects, IT can’t prepare the infrastructure, and the staff can’t adjust workflows or attend training rapidly enough while caring for patients.

As the government drives change, they are literally eating up providers’ ability to innovate on any terms other than the government’s. Prominent CIOs like John Halamka from BIDMC have articulated the challenge of keeping up with government mandates, and the need to actually set aside resources to innovate outside of government mandates.

Thus is the problem with health IT entrepreneurship today. Solving painful economic or patient-safety problems is simply not top of mind for CIOs, even if these initiatives broadly align with accountable care models. They are focused on what the government has told them to focus on, and not much else. Obviously, existing healthcare IT vendors are tackling the government mandates; it’s unlikely an under-capitalized startup without brand recognition can beat the legacy vendors when the basis of competition is so clear: do what the government tells you. Startups thrive when they can asymmetrically compete with legacy incumbents.

Google beat Microsoft by recognizing search was more important than the operating system; Apple beat Microsoft by recognizing mobile was more important than the desktop; SalesForce beat Oracle and SAP because they recognized the benefits of the cloud over on-premise deployments; Voalte is challenging Vocera because they recognized the power of the smartphone long before Vocera did. There are countless examples in and out of healthcare. Startups win when they compete on new, asymmetric terms. Startups never win by going head to head with the incumbent.

We are in an era of change in healthcare. It’s obvious that risk based models will become the dominant care delivery model, and this is creating enormous opportunity for startups to enter the space. Unfortunately, the government is largely dictating the scope and themes of risk-based care delivery, which is many ways actually stifling innovation.

Thus is the problem for health IT entrepreneurship today. Despite all of the ongoing change in healthcare, it’s actually harder than ever before to change healthcare delivery things as a startup. There is simply not enough attention of bandwidth to go around. When CIOs have strict project schedules that stretch out 18 months, how can startups break in? Startups can’t survive 18 month cycles.

Thus the is paradox of innovation: the more of it you’re told to innovate, the less you can actually innovate.

Digital Health at CES Wrap Up Video

Posted on January 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

CES 2015 is now in the headlights. One person I talked to said they thought that the event was missing some of the excitement of previous years. I disagreed with him. I thought it was more exciting than previous years. Although, my excitement comes from the entrepreneurs and the Digital Health space. If you look at the larger CES floor with the massive million dollar booths, it was lacking some luster. Of course, with the size of CES, it’s easy to understand why two people could have very different experiences.

If you’re interested about what else I found at CES, I sat down with Dr. Nick van Terheyden, CMIO at Nuance, to talk about our experiences at CES 2015 and some of the takeaways from what we saw. I think you’ll enjoy this CES 2015 video chat below:

A Video Look at the Digital Health, Fitness and Wellness Section of CES 2015

Posted on January 8, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

After my initial CES Observations post, I’ve spent most of the time on some over the counter drugs and trying to stay warm in bed. Luckily I think I’m on the way out of whatever cold/flu/misery I had upon me. However, it kind of ruined many of my CES plans.

With that said, I did make some time to go and at least check out the Digital Health section of CES 2015. I wrote about the wearables explosion over on Smart Phone Healthcare and to illustrate some of what I describe in that post, I shot this video of the Digital Health exhibition space at CES. I was moving pretty fast to get through it in 12 minutes, but you’ll see a bunch of the brands and booths that were there along with a feeling for the event (Yes, tomorrow I need to go and investigate the steady cam options at the show.).

If you’ve been at CES or watching the coverage back home. What’s been most exciting, interesting, impressive, thought provoking, disappointing?

6 Healthcare Incubators Growing the Future of HealthTech

Posted on October 30, 2014 I Written By

With the rapidly-growing demand for technologies that solve challenges for healthcare patients, professionals and institutions, many of the most innovative and disruptive solutions are coming not from large corporations, but small, scrappy startup companies.

With this trend has risen a group of startup “incubators” and “accelerators” specifically focused on healthcare technology entrepreneurs. These organizations serve as a launching pad for healthtech startups by facilitating high-value mentoring, collaboration and investor connections, plus basic needs like office infrastructure and seed funding.

For the startups, this gives them the time and resources to refine their technologies and services while finding investors and customers. Meanwhile the accelerators benefit by building local economies, solving healthcare challenges, and opening up highly-profitable opportunities for their backing investors

Below, we’ll introduce you to some of the leading incubators in the healthcare industry. These incubators have a proven track record in helping innovative young companies bring new ideas and services to consumers and businesses.

The Top-Six Healthcare Incubators and Accellerators


Rock Health – Rock Health invites early stage companies to work within the incubator and receive funding and mentorship from a variety of companies and health organizations. Rock Health notes that 18% of our economy is healthcare-based, but it’s one of the last industries to receive a tech makeover.  With more than 50 active startups in its portfolio, Rock Health is one of the most experienced healthcare incubators, especially for startups that focus on providing web services, mobile applications and SaaS solutions for healthcare providers and companies.


Health Wildcatters – Health Wildcatters is a mentorship-driven healthcare seed accelerator in Dallas; slightly different than an incubator. Though similar to incubators in their goals, accelerators typically acquire a small amount of equity in a startup, then work quickly to help a company achieve a short-term goal like raising money or launching a product. While incubators house companies for months or years, accelerators like Health Wildcatters work in weeks. Health Wildcatters focuses mainly on early-stage healthcare technology startups, including IT, SaaS, digital health and mobile health companies. Companies receive an initial seed investment and a 12-week program in which Health Wildcatters works quickly to help the company build value and refine its product. The name “wildcatter” hearkens back to independent oil entrepreneurs who were willing to take risks in where they drilled. Health Wildcatters takes the same approach to finding companies. This entrepreneurial approach allows it to help more startups reach their goals.


StartUp Health –Chaired by TimeWarner CEO Jerry Levin, this incubator aims to fund 1,000 healthcare companies within the next decade to help transform the face of the healthcare industry. StartUp Health works to build sustainable growth in its companies over a three-year period. During the incubation period, StartUp Health matches companies with a network of more than 10,000 health professionals and business people focused on improving digital health and wellness.


The Iron Yard – With its first location in Asheville, NC, the Iron Yard is growing a network of incubators focused on growing new areas of technology like digital health, green tech and emerging technologies. Its digital health accelerator, located in Spartanburg, SC, is working to turn one of the nation’s oldest railroad junctions into a hub for digital health innovation. The Iron Yard offers startups $20,000 in seed capital and three months of mentorship and workshops from experts in design, development and financing. The Iron Yard also offers training in web development and programming to place graduates with the startup companies it supports.


Blueprint Health – Blueprint Health, located in New York City, is one of the largest incubators in any niche and offers an expansive network of healthcare mentors to assist healthcare entrepreneurs launch new ventures. Blueprint Health focuses on companies developing tech projects directly for hospitals, physicians and health plans rather than consumer-facing applications, which means deeper access to established customers. In 2013, Blueprint Health focused its efforts on mature startups companies. While many incubators assist early-stage companies, more than half of Blueprint’s mentees already had paying customers. With more than 12,000 sq. ft. of space and two classes per year, Blueprint Health is able to help more than 100 healthcare companies each year.


Healthbox –  Healthbox offers accelerator programs in Boston, Chicago, Tampa, London, Nashville and Salt Lake City that provide  digital health entrepreneurs with funding and access to a global network of healthcare investors and providers. Healthbox launched its first accelerator program in Chicago in 2012 and quickly grew to other states and the UK. It recently expanded its business programs with $7 million in funding and started a program that helps hospitals create their own in-house Healthbox accelerator programs that, in turn, help companies gain traction within their own medical communities. So far, Healthbox has invested in 56 active startups, supported by a network of more than 350 expert mentors.

About the Author: David Vogel is a blogger for Datapipe, a leading provider of HIPAA-compliant hosting and managed cloud hosting. Connect with David on Twitter (@DavidVogelDotCo) and Google+ (+David Vogel).

Patient Shark Tank at Digital Health Conference

Posted on October 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of and John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’ve been working with NYeC to promote the Digital Health Conference since the very first Digital Health Conference 4 years ago. It’s a great event and I get a chance to meet many of you readers there. Plus, I just love spending time in NYC. If you’ve never been, you can register here (20% off your registration when you use the discount code: HCS).

I just heard about a new feature at the conference this year: The Patient Shark Tank. Here’s a description of what they have in store:

How do we ensure that the patient voice is amplified in the design, the development, or enhancement of innovations created FOR the patient? Patient communities are emerging as key influencers and disrupting the healthcare landscape. They are impacting strategies, policies, and setting the stage for new patient-centric innovations. Patients are now sought after thought leaders influencing the way healthcare systems think about and interact with patients and prodding them to improve the patient experience.

Join us as our judges rate innovations from the patient and caregiver perspective and innovators build their perspective into the innovations designed to serve them. As each innovator pitches their concept or initiative, our patient and caregiver panelists will ask targeted questions based on their experiences to understand how the innovation uniquely addresses patient needs. In addition, we will integrate clinician perspective to understand whether a doctor would prescribe the innovation to their patients.

I’m a huge fan of Shark Tank, so I love the idea. I only hope that they’ve got a line up of judges that are as entertaining as Shark Tank. Sometimes these events can get pretty bland if they choose judges who are shy about sharing their opinions on a company or product. That doesn’t benefit the companies or the audience.

Unfortunately, you won’t have much time to get your idea submitted. The deadline to apply to pitch your innovative concept or initiative is Thursday, October 16th. I look forward to seeing what ideas get pitched at the event.