Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

For Health IT Opportunities, Look to the Chaos

Posted on October 9, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

Sunnie Southern, founder and CEO of Viable Synergy, spends her days pushing for health IT innovation. Her firm provides products and consulting services for commercialization and community engagement. One of its best-known projects is Innov8 for Health, a Cincinnati-based tech accelerator. Southern, a registered dietitian who started her firm in 2010, talked about her work and about EMRs — as they are and as they could be.

Sunnie Southern

What does Viable Synergy do?

Viable Synergy specializes in commercializing assets that transform health. It offers consulting services and proprietary products that support the development and deployment of innovative health solutions from concept to customer. This year and next, Viable Synergy is focused on the institutional market by helping hospitals and provider organizations to generate new (non-clinical) revenue from currently available assets.

You are part of the Health Data Consortium. What is that?

The Health Data Consortium is a collaboration among government, non-profit and private sector organizations working to foster the availability and innovative use of data to improve health and health care.

Viable Synergy leads the Ohio Affiliate of the Health Data Consortium through our Innov8 for Health program. HDC Affiliates host events and build local networks of groups including startups, entrepreneurs, health companies, universities, government agencies and other innovators to create an ecosystem around using open data to improve health outcomes for individuals and communities.

Do you think EMRs are reaching their potential in improving health?

We are at the very beginning of a new era of leveraging technology to improve health and care and reduce costs. EHRs are an essential component of gaining access to health data to make better decisions.

What is missing from the equation?

Time. We need time to bring the plans to fruition to increase engagement and activation.

The essential elements are in place:

  • Standards that provide direction on necessary features and now interoperability/accessibility (MU2)
  • Incentives to increase purchase, implementation and meaningful use
  • Awareness within the health care community and beyond about the importance of ensuring that providers and patients have access to the critical information they need to make informed decisions

What goals do you think we should be prioritizing in health IT right now?

Interoperability, integration and convergence. There are so many places that providers and patients must go to access critical information that it is difficult to get a complete picture of a patient’s history or a physician’s patient population. I hope that we will begin to see tools that allow for data to be aggregated from multiple sources and provided in an easily consumable fashion. We’ll also need the appropriate regulations to secure and support the aggregation.

What’s the most exciting thing you see happening in health IT at the moment?

The whole system is being turned inside out and upside down. Everyone across the health care continuum is focusing on how to perform their role better. Innovative solutions are popping up everywhere. The chaos is creating massive opportunities. We really have a chance to make a difference. I believe it is the best time ever to be an entrepreneur in health care. So glad to be a part of it!

Eyes Wide Shut – Teaching to the Meaningful Use Stage 2 Test

Posted on September 30, 2013 I Written By

Mandi Bishop is a healthcare IT consultant and a hardcore data geek with a Master's in English and a passion for big data analytics, who fell in love with her PCjr at 9 when she learned to program in BASIC. Individual accountability zealot, patient engagement advocate, innovation lover and ceaseless dreamer. Relentless in pursuit of answers to the question: "How do we GET there from here?" More byte-sized commentary on Twitter: @MandiBPro.

According to Twitter analytics, one of my more engaging tweets recently stated that Meaningful Use is stifling innovation by requiring that health IT vendors and healthcare providers employ very specific tactics to capture and report on clinical data capture and interoperability standards compliance – ostensibly to engage and empower the patient, and improve coordination of care between providers. Of course, I said it much more succinctly than that. In effect, conforming to the Meaningful Use Stage 2 attestation measures is akin to “teaching to the test”:

Here’s a real-world example of what it means to “teach to the test” of Meaningful Use. In order to qualify for CMS incentive dollars, Meaningful Use Stage 2 Year 1 patient engagement measures must be met, with auditable data captured, in a 90-day contiguous period in 2014. An eligible provider (EP) must demonstrate that 50% of all patients with encounters during that time period have online access to their clinical summary within 4 days of the data becoming available to the provider. 5% of those patients must access the clinical information within the 90 days, and 5% of those patients must leverage secure messaging to communicate relevant health information with the provider. Finally, the MU-certified EMR must proffer patient-specific education materials for 10% of the patients seen during that time.

What I believe the ONC had in mind when they crafted these measures: engaged patients who will log in to their portal after each encounter, review the findings and lab results to assess their own progress and outcomes, read or listen to the condition-specific educational materials provided that resonate with them, and ask more meaningful questions of their providers as a result of this new-found, data-enabled empowerment. That is why they categorize these measures as “patient engagement”, right?

Wrong. This is what “patient engagement” looks like, from the EMR implementation, Meaningful Use-consultant, EP business process standpoint.

First, establish the bare minimum thresholds for meeting the measures. If the EP saw 1000 patients during the same 3-month period the previous year, your denominator is 1000; calculate the numerator for each measure based on that. So, we need 500 patients to have access to their clinical data online; 50 patients must access their information; 50 patients must communicate with their provider via secure messaging; 100 patient encounters must prompt specific educational opportunities.

To meet the 500 patients with online access to their clinical data, patient portal software is preloaded with patient demographic accounts, based on the registration data already available in the EMR. An enrollment request is emailed to the patient or authorized representative (assuming an email address is available in their demographic information). The EMR captures the event of sending this email, which contains the information about how to enroll and access the patient’s medical records via the portal. This measure is met, without the patient acknowledging the portal’s existing, and without any direct communication between provider and patient.

The medical records view and secure messaging measures can be met simultaneously, in a matter of days, by planning to add a few extra minutes to each encounter for 50 patients’ worth of appointments. The EMR has already triggered an email with portal enrollment information to each of the patients in the waiting room on a given day. As the medical assistant (MA) is taking vital stats, she asks whether the patient has enrolled in the portal. It’s likely the patient has not; the MA hands the patient a tablet and has him log in to his email, and walks him through the portal enrollment and initial login process. Once logged in, the MA directs the patient to click the link to view his medical record. That click is recorded, and the “view” measure is met; whether a CCD or C-CCD is actually displayed is irrelevant to the attestation data capture.

Having demonstrated how a patient can view his record, the MA then asks the patient to go into the portal’s message center, to send a test communication to the provider. The patient completes the required fields, and the MA prompts him with a generic health-related question to type into the body of the message. Once the patient hits “Send”, the event is recorded, and the “secure messaging” measure is met.

For all patients, whether portal-users or not, a new process begins when the MA finishes, the provider enters the room and begins her evaluation of each of the 100 patients required to meet the education measure. As the patient talks, the provider is clicking through EMR workflow screens, recording the encounter data. The EMR occasionally prompts with a dialogue box indicating educational materials are available for patients with this diagnosis code, or this lab result. Each dialogue box prompt is recorded by the EMR; the “patient-specific education” measure is met, whether the provider acts on the prompt and discusses or distributes the educational information or not.

To put it simply: the patient never has to log in to a portal to meet the 50% online availability requirement, they don’t have to actually view their records to meet the 5% view requirement, they don’t have to have an actual message exchange with their provider to meet the 5% communication requirement, and they don’t have to receive any tailored materials to meet the 10% education requirement. Once those clicks have been recorded, the actions never have to be repeated; meaningful and ongoing patient engagement is not needed to meet the attestation requirements and receive the incentive dollars.

In a previous post, I introduced my interpretation of the difference between the spirit and letter of the Meaningful Use “law”. By teaching to the test, we’re addressing the letter of the law, only, in its narrowest interpretation. When will we incent vendors and providers to go above and beyond and find ways to truly engage patients in meaningful ways, empowering them with accurate, timely data access and tools to analyze it?

Are State Health Agencies Ready for Meaningful Use Stage 2?

Posted on September 23, 2013 I Written By

James Ritchie is a freelance writer with a focus on health care. His experience includes eight years as a staff writer with the Cincinnati Business Courier, part of the American City Business Journals network. Twitter @HCwriterJames.

As part of its public health objectives, Meaningful Use 2 requires doctors and hospitals to report sizable amounts of information.

The idea is that when significant patterns are forming — an outbreak of a certain disease, for example, or a peculiar cluster of symptoms — they’ll be apparent right away.

But someone has to be in position to receive the data.

The responsibility falls to local and public health departments. Agencies around the country should, theoretically, be preparing for the immunization records, laboratory results and other information they’ll soon be getting.

Just how many will be ready, though, remains to be seen. Many cash-strapped departments lack the IT infrastructure for what’s being asked of them — and the money allocated by the government hasn’t amounted to much, according to a 2012 American Journal of Public Health article by Drs. Leslie Lenert and David Sundwall.

In fact, the authors wrote, the federal effort “has created unfunded mandates that worsen financial strains” on health departments.

There’s a caveat, though: The mandates aren’t really mandates.

“Nothing compels them to do it” except the desire to do the right thing, said Frieda du Toit, owner of Lakeside, Calif.-based Advanced Business Software. “Some directors are interested, some are not. The lack of money is the main thing.”

In our recent interview, du Toit, whose company specializes in information management solutions for health departments, added: “One customer asked me: ‘Am I going to be punished in any way, form or fashion if I don’t support the efforts of my hospitals and care providers?”

Her firm’s Web-based Public Health Information Management System serves cities and counties throughout the United States, including in California, Texas and Connecticut.

The federal government’s goal is for public health agencies to be involved in four administrative tasks to support MU2, according to the Stage 2 Meaningful Use Public Health Reporting Task Force. The task force is a collaboration between the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nonprofit public health associations and public health practitioners.

The first step is to take place before the start of MU2 — that’s Oct. 1, 2013, for hospitals and Jan. 1, 2014, for individual providers.

The tasks:

  • Declaration of readiness. Public health agencies tell the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services what public health initiatives they can support.
  • Registration of intent. Hospitals and providers notify public health agencies in writing what objectives they seek to meet.
  • On-boarding. Medical providers work with health departments work to achieve ongoing Meaningful Use data submission.
  • Acknowledgement. Public health agencies inform providers that reportable data has been received.

For doctors and other eligible professionals, MU2 calls for ongoing submission of electronic data for immunizations. Hospitals are to submit not only immunizations but also reportable laboratory results and syndromic surveillance data.

Health care providers whose local public health departments lack the resources to support MU2 are exempt from the reporting requirements.

In Meaningful Use Stage 3, which health IT journalist Neil Versel wrote is likely to begin in 2017, “electronic health records systems with new capabilities, such as the ability to work with public health alerting systems and on-screen ‘buttons’ for submitting case reports to public health, are envisioned,” according to Lenert and Sundwall.

The authors noted: “Public health departments will be required not just to upgrade their systems once, but also to keep up with evolving changes in the clinical care system” prompted by the regulations.

They proposed cloud computing as a better way. Shared systems and remote hosting, Lenert and Sundwall suggested, could get the work done efficiently and affordably, albeit at a cost to individual jurisdictions’ autonomy.

As EMR adoption grows, it would be a shame not to take advantage of the opportunities for public health. The entire health IT effort being pushed by the federal government is, after all, geared toward improving the health of populations.

Without money for the job, though, public health agencies’ ability to support Meaningful Use will likely always be limited. It looks like a good time to think about committing significant funds, embracing cloud-based solutions or both.

Disaster Planning and HIPAA

Posted on November 20, 2012 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

When talk turns to HIPAA, most of us are focused on privacy compliance.  After all, privacy is a complex, expensive nightmare, and few hospitals or medical practices feel up to the task, so talking through those issues makes sense.

But as blogger Art Gross points out, the HIPAA Security General Rules require more than protecting a patient’s privacy. They also require that ePHI remains available even in the face of disaster. From the rules (courtesy of Gross, emphasis his):

§ 164.306 Security standards: General rules.
(a) General requirements. Covered entities must do the following:
(1) Ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of all electronic protected health information the covered entity creates, receives, maintains, or transmits.

Apparently, far too few healthcare providers are paying enough attention to this part of the rules. Gross, who is a HIPAA security consultant, says that when he audits organizations, few have disaster recovery or emergency operations procedures in place.

Now, big enterprise IT departments aren’t going to leave disaster recovery out of their planning; it’s simplly part of the drill for any large installation. But the smaller the provider group gets — particularly when you zoom down to one to three-doctor practices — the story changes.

As people who read blogs like this one know, smaller practices aren’t likely to have so much as a single IT staffer on board. Keeping their EMR up and running is enough of a burden. I’m not at all surprised to hear that they aren’t prepared for disasters like Hurricane Sandy, which brought down even large medical centers.

But with HIPAA demanding immediate access to ePHI, doctors won’t have a choice much longer. And hospitals will want to make sure independent doctors aren’t the weak link in the availability chain.

Yes, it’s asking a lot of small practices to make intellligent disaster recovery plans for their EMR, and even more of their hospital partners if they want to keep access to disparate EMRs out there.  But there’s just no getting around the problem.

Major EMR Vendor Consolidation On The Verge

Posted on June 14, 2012 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Note: This is a post by Katherine Rourke. Tomorrow watch for a post by John on EMR and EHR where he discusses some of his views on this discussion.

While it may not be immediately obvious, the EMR industry is at a major turning point in its history. Any day now, we’re going to see a bunch of mergers and acquisitions go off like a string of firecrackers, some of which may have a direct impact on your business.

Now, I don’t know how many EMR companies there are out there. In fact, I’m not sure anyone has a precise count. But can we agree that we’re looking at 1,000 or more, no?  And, heck, there’s probably thousands of companies pitching practice management + EMR,  medication management systems, clinical decision support, apps, mobile health plug-ins to EMRs and so on. Just visualize it all — you’ll get a headache but you’ll doubtless agree that we’re dealing with a raging flood of technology.

And most of it won’t stand alone forever. Every vendor likes to say that their product line has all the solutions, but even the most green sales rep doesn’t really believe that. Smart EMR tech firms and their natural allies are already beginning the mating dance, and quietly but inexorably, hooking up.

Since this isn’t the Wall Street Journal, I’m sure we don’t need to dig into deep financial discussion over this. And anyone who’s a regular reader of this site knows why software companies often buy rather than build the technologies they need to fill out their portfolio.

But I thought it was still worth noting that within, say, 18 months, the EMR world could look fairly different in the following ways:

* EMRs aimed at doctors are overabundant, to put it mildly. I predict that there will be a dozen or so well-publicized failures or buyouts in this space within the next year.

* Big vendors that pitch to both enterprises and medical practices will largely have to pick one,and it’s the enterprise side that will win. If you’re a doctor running a giant company’s EMR, stay in regular touch with your vendor and get their support promises in writing!

* There will be a flurry of mHealth activity, with EMRs that play nicely on tablets in center stage.  It’s possible the market will even support another IPO or two this year by EMR vendors if they’re offering a nifty mobile health aspect integrated with their core product.

* Doctors, in particular, risk finding that their product becomes abandonware this year as the market consolidates.  Have a Plan B available, and I mean a written plan developed by a consultant or tech-savvy senior member of your team.

So, what else do you think will happen as the market absorbs excess players and recombines relationships?

Tricorder Devices, REC Numbers, and EHR Photo IDs: This Week in HealthCare Scene

Posted on June 10, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

John’s Note: As regular readers know, I usually reserve the Sunday post to do a Twitter round up. The Sunday post on EMR and EHR has been a Healthcare Scene round up post written by Katie. I decided to mix things up a little bit. Each week I’ll swap which site does the Twitter round up and which site does the Around Healthcare Scene.

If all of this is confusing, don’t worry. Just subscribe to the emails for EMR and HIPAA & EMR and EHR and you’ll be all set. Now sit back and enjoy a look around the Healthcare Scene network.

EMR and EHR
The Shift From Expensive Technology to Cost Saving Technology

For years, medical technology came with a hefty price tag. While many of these investments were a miracle worker of sorts, it left hospitals and medical practices with a large bill. Fortunately, in recent years, the technology being released, such as EHR, are trying to make health care less expensive. While it is up for debate if software like EHR really is less expensive, there is a definite shift in the costs of medical technology.

Photo IDs as Part of the Patient Record — Flashy Trend or Future of Medicine?

Unfortunately, errors do occur in hospitals. However, putting photos on a patient record may help prevent some of these problems. Children’s Hospital in Colorado is currently trying this out. The number of mistaken orders dropped from 12 in 2010 to 3 in 2010 since the hospital started using photo IDs. So the question is, are photo IDs worth the time and effort?

Hospital EMR and EHR
Make Consumers Want Their PHR

More PHRs seem to be popping up, but are any of them really convincing people to use them? Anne Zeigler doesn’t think she. In this post, she lists several different ideas on how to get people “excited” about PHRs with tips such as good marketing and rewarding the user. If companies want consumers to use their PHR, many things should be taken into consideration.

EMR Thoughts

REC Numbers for REACH (Minnesota and North Dakota Doctors)

REACH is a nonprofit federal Health Information Technology Regional Extension Center that aims to help hospitals and medical practices through Minnesota and North Dakota implement EHR or optimize the current system. It had many goals in mind when it started, and recently, many of these goals have been met or surpassed. REACH serves 4,749 priority primary care providers across these two states.

EHR and EMR Videos

Dr. Eric Hartz’s EHR Story from the 2012 HIMSS Conference

At the recent HIMSS Conference, Dr. Eric Hartz shared his thoughts on EHR. He discussed the benefits of EHRs and gave tips on participating in incentive programs. He also talked about how to use EHR across a number of different hospitals.

Smart Phone Health Care

Is the Tricorder Device a Reality?

Is that rash on your child something serious, or nothing to worry about? Or is that fever from a UTI? Scanadu, a tricorder-like device, supposedly will use social media to help make healthcare more immediate and accessible. The machine will allow people to take a picture or sample of something worrisome, and immediately find out what action needs to be taken. The world of social medicine is quickly expanding, and a tricorder is becoming an actual possibility.

Pajamas Created to Monitor an Infant’s Vital Stats, Sends Mobile Alerts

Wearable monitors are popping up throughout the health care world. The latest? Pajamas for an infant to wear. It monitors an infant’s vital stats and sends mobile alerts to the parents. Great idea, or just another gimmick to sell to paranoid parents? Read more and decide for yourself.

EMR is the Health Care ERP

Posted on June 28, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I know I’ve written about ERP and EMR before, but the more I think about the EMR selection and implementation process, the more I see the same issues that are experienced with an ERP implementation.

The one issue that is a bit different about EMR versus ERP is that there are only a small handful of ERP vendors to choose from. However, we have 300-600 to choose from in the EMR world. That’s an important and challenging difference.

However, the similarities to ERP are many. One of the most striking is how the EMR like the ERP is something that’s going to be used and have an effect on the entire organization. As such, the need to manage the participation of multiple stakeholders is so key.

The key to a successful ERP implementation is to have a great project leader.  Someone who is great at working with various departments. They are great listeners who hear and understand each departments needs. Then, they have to be great at making the case for each depaartment’s needs.

The same is true for EMR. You need an EMR implementation champion who is great at listening to all areas of the clinic: nurses, doctors, front desk, billing, medical records, etc. Sometimes this can be done well by a physician lead, but is more likely to be a practice manager, IT support (if they have project management skills), or an outside consultant. 

It’s easy to underestimate the challenge of “herding sheep.” Done right, it can work very well. Done wrong and your clinic is likely going to have the opportunity to try again after the failed EMR implementation.

There are other comparisons worth considering, but this one was striking me today. I’ll be interested to hear stories and experiences from those who have implemented an EMR. Did you have a strong leader to help pacify the different stakeholders in your clinic? 

Helping doctors adapt to EMRs

Posted on May 8, 2011 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Much ink has been spilled discussing why physicians are resistant to adopting EMRs.

The thing is, it’s really no mystery.  Researchers have arrived at what seem like sensible answers to the question, including a) problems changing their work habits, b) fear of the unknown and c) struggles with kludgy interfaces.

So, why not take these problems on directly? While we can’t get inside clinicians’ heads and tell them how to think, we can address their issues concretely.

If the anecdotes I hear are accurate, many are pushed into EMR use and forced to do all the adapting, rather than getting the help they need.

So how can we help?

Obviously, physicians and other clinical staffers need access to accessible, intelligent training — ideally, both Web-based and live — as well as easy-to-use documentation that’s written in very simple language.

But that’s not all. While many institutions breeze by this step, IT departments (or consultants) should do everything they can to customize the EMR experience for individual clinicians. (If your EMR is too rigid to allow for this, that’s another story, but let’s pray you have one with some flexibility built in.)

It’s also important to pinpoint what other frustrations clinicians may have. For example, some doctors who type poorly are immensely frustrated by using EMRs, something keyboard-savvy techs might never consider.  A good old-fashioned typing course might work wonders in those cases.

In the rush to deal with the complex technical issues involved in EMR integration, it’s easy to blow by the needs of individual users.  It’s even easier to throw some fragmentary training at clinicians and assume they have a bad attitude if it doesn’t “take.”

The truth is, though, that nobody can afford to be short-sighted about getting users connected to EMRs.  Let’s hope everyone bears this in mind as the main wave of rollouts begins.

HIMSS Attire Day 2 – Top 10 Real Reasons I’m at HIMSS11

Posted on February 21, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

image
Today I have a special shirt made just for HIMSS, thanks to the great people at Enterprise Software Deployment.

If you see me at HIMSS, check out my shirt. It has the top 10 real reasons I’m at HIMSS listed on the back of the shirt. My favorite is #4 Booth babes. I’ll post the full top 10 later tonight.

Also, be sure to check out Enterprise Software Deployment at HIMSS if you need a great EMR consultant or if you’re looking for a position doing EMR consulting. You can find them at Booth #2777.

Here’s their HIMSS exhibitor description:
At ESD, our goal is to ensure successful implementation of a new EHR system or upgrade from start to finish in healthcare organizations around the globe. Our services include Clinical Transformation, Legacy System Support, Training, Supplemental Staff Augmentations, Clinical and System Transformation, as well as education and training in all aspects of Cerner®, Siemens®, Epic®, Eclipsys®, MEDITECH, and McKesson systems.

Thanks for ESD for sponsoring such a cool shirt for me.

Convincing Doctors to Do EMR

Posted on January 11, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday I was attending a conference that had almost nothing to do with EMR. However, in one of my conversations a young girl told me that her dad was a doctor. She went on to tell me how it is all that her dad can talk about her.  He was trying to convince himself why he should ignore the stimulus money and not do EMR.

Of course, this part isn’t that interesting since I think we all know many doctors who are doing something similar. What was very interesting was that the daughter of this doctor explained how she was trying to convince her dad why he should do EMR. In fact, she suggested that she might have read my EMR site before because she’d done searches to learn more about EMR so that she could convince her doctor father to use an EMR.

This discussion of why you should or shouldn’t use an EMR is really nothing new. My challenge with the discussion is that I’ve seen first hand the benefits of EMR. However, I’ve also heard many stories of EMR implementations which utterly failed.

I don’t know all the answers to this situation, but it is something I want to think about more.

I do think that selecting the right EMR is the first step in the process. The other challenge is finding the right person or people to support your implementation.   Now, how do we simplify and improve those two objectives?