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Are Client Server EHR Holding Back Healthcare?

Posted on December 19, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The number one topic of debate on this blog has definitely been Client Server EHR versus SaaS EHR. There are staunch parties on both sides of this aisle. No doubt both sides have a case to make and we’ll see both in healthcare for a long time to come. Although, I think that long term the SaaS EHR will win out.

As I was thinking about this recently, I realized that while client server EHR can do everything a SaaS EHR can do, it definitely makes a lot of things much harder to accomplish.

It’s much harder to create an API that connects to 2000 client server EHR installs.

It’s much harder to make 2000 client server EHR installs interoperable.

It’s much harder to evaluate data across 2000 client server EHR installs.

I’m sure I could keep going with this list, but you get the point. Even though something is possible, it doesn’t mean that they’re actually going to do it. In fact, if it’s hard to do, then it takes extreme pressure for them to do it.

All of this has me begging the question of whether client server installs are holding back the EHR industry. Up until now, many of the things I mention above haven’t been that important. Going forward I think that all three of the things I mention above are going to be very important.

The good thing is that I see many client server EHR moving to some kind of hosted EHR solution. That solves some of the problems mentioned above. At least if it’s a hosted EHR solution, they can control the environment and more easily implement things like API access and interoperability. That’s much harder in the client server world where if you have 2000 EHR installs, you have 2000 unique setups.

Of course, as soon as a large SaaS EHR has a massive breach, healthcare will go running after the client server EHR. The battle lines are drawn and each side knows each other very well. Although, I think the SaaS EHR have the high ground right now. We’ll see how that continues over time. Client server EHR have done an amazing job battling.

The Future of Electronic Health Records in the US: Lessons Learned from the UK – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on December 17, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Carrie Yasemin Paykoc, Senior Instructional Designer / Research Analyst at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Carrie Yasemin Paykoc
With 2014 coming to a close, there is a natural tendency to reflect on the accomplishments of the year. We gauge our annual successes through comparison with expected outcomes, industry standards, and satisfaction with the work done. To continue momentum and improve outcomes in the coming years we look for fresh ideas. For example, healthcare organizations can compare their efforts with similar types of organizations both locally and abroad. In the United States, looking beyond our existing borders toward the international community can provide valuable insight. Many other nations such as the UK, are further down the path of providing national healthcare and adopting electronic health records. In fact, the National Health Service (NHS) of UK has started plans to allow access of  Electronic Health Records (EHR) on Smartphones through approved health apps. Although healthcare industry standards appear to be in constant flux, these valuable international lessons can help local healthcare leaders develop strategies for 2015 and beyond.

By the year 2024, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) aims to improve population health through the interoperable exchange of health information, and the utilization of research and evidence-based medicine. These bold and inspiring goals are outlined in their 10 Year Vision to Achieve Interoperable Health IT Infrastructure, also known as ONC’s interoperability road map. This document provides initial guidance on how the US will lay the foundation for EHR adoption and interoperable Healthcare Information Technology (HIT) systems. ONC has also issued the Federal Health IT Strategic Plan 2015-2020. This strategy aims to improve national interoperability, patient engagement, and expansion of IT into long-term care and mental health. Achieving these audacious goals seems quite challenging but a necessary step in improving population health.

EHR Adoption in UK
The US is not alone in their EHR adoption and interoperability goals. Many nations in our international community are years ahead of the US in terms of EHR implementation and utilization. Just across the Atlantic Ocean, the United Kingdom has already begun addressing opportunities and challenges with EHR adoption and interoperability. In their latest proposal the NHS has outlined their future vision for personalized health care in 2020. This proposal discusses the UK’s strategy for integrating HIT systems into a national system in a meaningful way. This language is quite similar to Meaningful Use and ONC’s interoperability roadmap in the United States. With such HIT parallels much could be learned from the UK as the US progresses toward interoperability.

The UK began their national EHR journey in the 1990s with incentivizing the implementation of EHR systems. Although approximately 96 percent of all general provider practices use EHRs in the UK, only a small percentage of practices have adopted their systems. Clinicians in the UK are slow to share records electronically with patients or with their nation’s central database, the Spine.

Collaborative Approach
In the NHS’s Five Year Forward View they attempt to address these issues and provide guidance on how health organization can achieve EHR adoption with constrained resources. One of the strongest themes in the address is the need for a collaborative approach. The EHRs in the UK were procured centrally as part of their initial national IT strategy. Despite the variety of HIT systems, this top-down approach caused some resentment among the local regions and clinics. So although these HIT systems are implemented, clinicians have been slow to adopt the systems to their full potential. (Sarah P Slight, et al. (2014). A qualitative study to identify the cost categories associated with electronic health record implementation in the UK. JAMIA, 21:e226-e231) To overcome this resistance, the NHS must follow their recommendations and work collaboratively with clinical leadership at the local level to empower technology adoption and ownership. Overcoming resistance to change takes time, especially on such a large national scale.

Standard Education Approach
Before the UK can achieve adoption and interoperability, standardization must occur. Variation in system use and associated quality outcomes can cause further issues. EHR selection was largely controlled by the government, whereas local regions and clinics took varied approaches to implementing and educating their staff. “Letting a thousand flowers bloom” is often the analogy used when referring to the UK’s initial EHR strategy. Each hospital and clinic had the autonomy of deciding on their own training strategy which consisted of one-on-one training, classroom training, mass training, or a combination of training methods. They struggled to back-fill positions to allow clinicians time to learn the new system. This process was also expensive. At one hospital £750 000 (over $1.1 million US) was spent to back-fill clinical staff at one hospital to allow for attendance to training sessions. This expensive and varied approach to training makes it difficult to ensure proficient system use, end-user knowledge and confidence, and consistent data entry. In the US we also must address issues of consistency in our training to increase end-user proficiency levels. Otherwise the data being entered and shared is of little value.

One way to ensure consistent training and education is to develop a role-based education plan that provides only the details that clinicians need to know to perform their workflow. This strategy is more cost-effective and quickly builds end-user knowledge and confidence. In turn, as end-user knowledge and confidence builds, end users are more likely to adopt new technologies. Additionally, as staff and systems change, plans must address how to re-engage and educate clinicians on the latest workflows and templates to ensure standardized data entry. If the goal is to connect and share health information (interoperability), clinicians must follow best-practice workflows in order to capture consistent data.  One way to bridge this gap is through standardized role-based education.

Conclusion
Whether in the US or UK, adopting HIT systems require a comprehensive IT strategy that includes engaged leadership, qualitative and quantitative metrics, education and training, and a commitment to sustain the overall effort.  Although the structure of health care systems in the US and UK are different, many lessons can be learned and shared about implementing and adopting HIT systems. The US can further research benefits and challenges associated with the Spine, UK’s central database as the country moves toward interoperability. Whereas the UK can learn from education and change management approaches utilized in US healthcare organizations with higher levels of EHR adoption. Regardless of the continent, improving population health by harnessing available technologies is the ultimate goal of health IT.  As 2015 and beyond approaches, collaborate with your stakeholders both locally and abroad to obtain fresh ideas and ensure your healthcare organization moves toward EHR adoption.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Top 10 Google Searches in 2014 – What Would Be Healthcare IT’s Top Searches?

Posted on December 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Each year Google releases it’s top trending searches in the US and the world. This list isn’t the most frequently searched terms (according to Google the most popular searches don’t change) but is a year versus year comparison of what terms were trending in 2014.

US Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
Flappy Bird
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
ISIS
Ferguson
Frozen
Ukraine

Global Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
Flappy Bird
Conchita Wurst
ISIS
Frozen
Sochi Olympics

Pretty interesting look into 2014. Also amazing that a mobile app (Flappy Bird) made the list for the first time. There’s two healthcare terms: Ebola and ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. I wondered what this list would look like for healthcare IT. So, I decide to take a guess at what I think would be the trending healthcare IT terms of 2014:

ICD-10 Delay
EHR Penalties
Wearables
Meaningful Use Stage 2
Epic
Obamacare
FHIR
Cerner-Siemens
HIPAA Breaches
Patient Engagement

What do you think of the list? Would you order it differently? Are there terms you think should be on the list?

HL7 Backs Effort To Boost Patient Data Exchange

Posted on December 8, 2014 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Standards group Health Level Seven has kicked off a new project intended to increase the adoption of tech standards designed to improve electronic patient data exchange. The initiative, the Argonaut Project, includes just five EMR vendors and four provider organizations, but it seems to have some interesting and substantial goals.

Participating vendors include Athenahealth, Cerner, Epic, McKesson and MEDITECH, while providers include Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Intermoutain  Healthcare, Mayo Clinic and Partners HealthCare. In an interesting twist, the group also includes SMART, Boston Children’s Hospital Informatics Program’s federally-funded mobile app development project. (How often does mobile get a seat at the table when interoperability is being discussed?) And consulting firm the Advisory Board Company is also involved.

Unlike the activity around the much-bruited CommonWell Alliance, which still feels like vaporware to industry watchers like myself, this project seems to have a solid technical footing. On the recommendation of a group of science advisors known as JASON, the group is working at creating a public API to advance EMR interoperability.

The springboard for its efforts is HL7’s Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources. HL7’s FHir is a RESTful API, an approach which, the standards group notes, makes it easier to share data not only across traditional networks and EMR-sharing modular components, but also to mobile devices, web-based applications and cloud communications.

According to JASON’s David McCallie, Cerner’s president of medical informatics, the group has an intriguing goal. Members’ intent is to develop a health IT operating system such as those used by Apple and Android mobile devices. Once that was created, providers could then use both built-in apps resident in the OS and others created by independent developers. While the devices a “health IT OS” would have to embrace would be far more diverse than those run by Android or iOS, the concept is still a fascinating one.

It’s also neat to hear that the collective has committed itself to a fairly aggressive timeline, promising to accelerate current FHIT development to provide hands-on FHIR profiles and implementation guides to the healthcare world by spring of next year.

Lest I seem too critical of CommonWell, which has been soldiering along for quite some time now, it’s onlyt fair to note that its goals are, if anything, even more ambitious than the Argonauts’. CommonWell hopes to accomplish nothing less than managing a single identity for every person/patient, locating the person’s records in the network and managing consent. And CommonWell member Cerner recently announced that it would provide CommonWell services to its clients for free until Jan. 1, 2018.

But as things stand, I’d wager that the Argonauts (I love that name!) will get more done, more quickly. I’m truly eager to see what emerges from their efforts.

The Many Faces and Facets of EHR Interoperability

Posted on December 5, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Thanh Tran, CEO, Zoeticx, Inc.
Thanh Tran, CEO, Zoeticx
Interoperability is the ability to make sub-systems and organizations work together (inter-operate) for attainment of a common goal. In healthcare, implementation and connection of EHR systems and the data they collect allows for us to impact patient care to become a value-driven one for all patients.

The opposite of interoperability is not the lack of connecting EHR systems, but instead the failure of healthcare systems and organizations to collaborate in an efficient, effective, safe and consistent way to support patient care. To better understand the ecosystem of healthcare, we need to look at this redefined concept of interoperability in greater depth while also considering the needs of various stakeholders and their views of the system.

Care Providers Want Care Continuum

Care Providers are not a single entity whose needs can be fulfilled with a single solution. The focus of all providers is on the patient care continuum and their role in it. The lack of EHR interoperability is fundamentally defined as the inability to share patient medical records across this continuum.

Each provider brings a unique view and delivers specialized, customized care to the patient over different time periods. The care delivered by each provider is interdependent on other providers taking care of the patient for a current encounter. To deliver care, healthcare providers must have the ability to access not only summary information about a patient, or the outcome of a prior intervention, but also be able to drill down into the specific data where they can provide meaning and insight for the patient and the rest of the care team.

Collaborative healthcare, care delivered by specialized and focus teams of providers, has become standard in medicine. Access to the information and meaning provided by various providers is essential. It must be delivered in near time, to the proper provider on the team.

For care providers it is about the ability to see the whole care spectrum; to drill into details with on-demand and near time access.

IT Pros Need Information Flow

With healthcare IT pros, interoperability begins with patient medical information flow.  As the patient transits through healthcare facilities, they are treated by different care providers using different systems. Care providers depend on the above medical flow to ensure effective and quality care delivery. Proprietary patient medical records from diverse EHR systems prohibit that flow, leaving healthcare IT crippled, along with care providers, in enabling a seamless workflow across the system.

Healthcare IT organizations impacted by merger and acquisition face the lack of EHR interoperability under another major challenge, IT integration of disparate EHR systems. Rip and replace is a costly solution to achieving integration and overcoming EHR interoperability among diverse EHR systems.

Furthermore, healthcare IT faces the continued demand for solutions to patient care effectiveness, efficiency and improving patient care quality. However, healthcare IT application developers have been bogged down by the lack of EHR interoperability as well. The EHR agnostic environment is required to seal off applications from the EHR infrastructure. Without this layer, the development would be focused on addressing infrastructure challenges instead of innovative solutions for care providers.

As any other IT organization, healthcare IT faces the challenge of doing more with less. EHR systems share a number of characteristics as its siblings, enterprise applications from other IT industries. EHR systems form the backbone of healthcare systems, but they are also complex, slow to react to care providers’ requirements and costly to maintain. That cost is already in place, leaving healthcare IT with a smaller budget to address the lack of interoperability. Any solutions to EHR interoperability must be low total cost of ownership, lightweight to deploy and portable to a variety of healthcare IT applications.

Administrators Require Compliance and Data Protection

Healthcare administration is charged with complying with patient privacy requirements (HIPAA). Solutions for EHR interoperability with additional copies of patient medical records are not optimal since they represent additional compliance activities and agreements (such as Data Service Agreement) between the data source and destination. These additional compliance activities represent complexity, cost and risk of non-compliance that would result in potential penalties, legal and IT maintenance costs. For healthcare administration, simplicity and practicability of the solution are critical.

Patients Suffer Most

The greatest impact to all stakeholders in EHR interoperability is on the patient. Being at the center of the healthcare delivery model, patients must be brought into the interoperability equation. A vital component for gaining control of increasing healthcare expenditures is engagement of patients.

Not only do we need patient engagement, but patients are demanding security and control over who accesses their medical data. These two are not independent, but are intimately connected. Without control and understanding of who accesses the data, patients will lose trust in the system leading to disengagement and disempowerment.

Patient control over medical record access must be dynamic, secure and able to occur in near time. Above all, patients have full control of who has the full access of their medical records. Current concepts of Opt-In or Opt-Out choice for medical data duplication does not address these dynamic and secure requirements and give patients the control of who has access.

The Optimal EHR Interoperability Solution

EHR systems are database oriented. To address EHR interoperability by creating an additional centralized database layer is not an optimal approach, let alone the failure to satisfy the stakeholders impacted.

The next wave of healthcare challenges needs to be addressed by innovative applications aimed at supporting care providers. The best approach is a middleware infrastructure, supporting open architecture for healthcare, capable of performing data switching and value added data redistribution capabilities from various EHR systems. The middleware solution must be lightweight, embedded as part of healthcare applications supporting on-demand, near time access to diverse EHR systems. It is where interoperability must be implemented.

Thanh Tran is CEO of Zoeticx, Inc., a medical software company located in San Jose, CA. He is a 20 year veteran of Silicon Valley’s IT industry and has held executive positions at many leading software companies. Zoeticx offers a middleware infrastructure supporting on-demand, near time access to diverse EHR systems.

Insightful Tweets from #RSNA14

Posted on December 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’re not following @RasuShrestha, you’re missing out on some really good tweets. He’s sent a number of insightful tweets from RSNA that I thought were worth sharing..


I like the rhetoric of his statement, but I’d like to see more action too.


It’s interesting that they’re fans of consumerism. I know that many in healthcare don’t like to think of patients as consumers. They have good reasons for not wanting the comparison and it’s worthwhile to consider the difference. Plus, it’s worth noting that in our current system patients don’t really act like consumers. That’s why I think it’s true that consumerism is hitting healthcare.


I love plays on words. I’m going to have to chew on this one a bit more though.


Click on this image to blow it up. It definitely illustrates how important the EHR is, but also that the other health IT systems are important as well.


This is my favorite tweet. I saved it for the end so only the most faithful readers would get to see it. I’m not an expert on radiology, but this provides an interesting roadmap for some of the things that happening in radiology.

Op-Ed: Making Electronic Health Records Right

Posted on November 26, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Benjamin Shibata, MPH Student at GWU.
Ben Shibata
If you want to give hospital clinicians sever heart burn and arrhythmia, talk to them about implementing a new state-of-the-art electronic health record (EHR) system.  Although EHRs may seem like an intuitive improvement over paper health records, the transition to them has been a huge headache because the process is being forced rather than being organically chosen by the professionals using them.  Spurred along by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), incentives to implement EHRs in a timely manner were laid out.  Although helpful in motivating hospitals to make the change, the ARRA has contributed to an overly expedited process that needs to be more thoroughly thought out.  In order to roll out EHR systems correctly, we need to understand how health records have historically improved medicine so that we can improve upon rather than complicate an already complicated system.

From a public health standpoint, EHRs should have been something implemented years ago.  HealthIT.gov explains how EHRs stand for improved efficiency and better patient care through greater care coordination.  And why shouldn’t they?  Electronic records are more portable and can be theoretically accessed anywhere in the world.  Doctors would have better access to their records, be able to practice more efficiently, and collaborate with other physicians to achieve the best possible patient outcome.  Unfortunately this is not what is being seen in many places for varying reasons: poor usability, time-consuming data entry, interference with face-to-face patient care, an inability to exchange health information, and degradation of clinical documentation are a few of the most common complaints based on surveys from RAND.

To better understand why these complaints are happening, we need remind ourselves of how health records came to exist in the first place.  Health records were first embraced in the 1920s when health care providers saw that keeping records in detail improved safety, treatment results, and quality of the patient experience.  Even though the process of keeping written records created an added burden, the transition from no records to records provided added benefits that the medical profession as a whole could not function without.  This contrasts very differently with what is happening with the rollout of EHRs – many systems are adding burdens with no perceived benefits.   This is ultimately leading to the friction we are seeing today.

Rather than improving their workflow and the patient experience, many of the EHR systems offered today are impeding it: 70% of respondents to a Medscape survey taken last July reported decreased face-to-face time with patients due to EHR implementation.  Although it can be argued that it is only a matter of time before physicians get used to and see the benefits of EHRs, large room for improvements clearly exist.  Healthcare providers do not reject technology because they are stubborn or unintelligent; they reject technology when it doesn’t work right just like the rest of us.  If EHR systems are to be embraced, they need to fundamentally change and improve the physician-patient relationship just like the original paper records did, and that change needs to be apparent.  The following is a list of things EHR developers should be mindful of:

  • Good EHRs are more than converting a paper record to a portable digital format. Improved portability is a game changer, but the burden associated with allowing portability needs to be balanced with that benefit.
  • The patient experience with EHRs is just as important as the physician experience. Although it is important to make sure physicians are satisfied, EHRs provide patients with the ability to access their health records like never before.  Improvements with the patient experience will motivate faster adoption of EHRs.
  • Efficiency is not everything.  An EHR that gives patients and physicians useful information that improves outcomes is much more useful than an efficient EHR that is efficient but does not provide as much information.

The shift from paper health records to EHRs is inevitable, and in that process we deserve to get EHRs right.  We should be confident that this will be achieved if we improve the experience, outcome, and relationship of both the patient and the healthcare provider just as it has been since health records were created.  At the end of the day, EHRs are about improving our healthcare system and not settling for anything less than the best.

The Devil You Know

Posted on November 25, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’d recently heard a practice manager talking about their EHR and Practice Management system. We talked about the EHR they’d selected and what they thought of the setup, and then I asked which practice management (PM) system they were using. They responded that they’d been using the same PM system for so long, they didn’t have any desire to change it. Then they dropped the bomb:

“There are a lot of things we hate about our PM system, but we kind of look at it as the devil we know.”

I see this happen really often when it comes to EHR and PM systems. In fact, it happens everywhere in the world of technology. Sometimes we don’t have any desire to change because we know the system we have and it works. Does it have its pain points? Yes. Do they drive us nuts? Yes! But at least we know about them and know how to deal with them.

There’s a real fear by many to switch to a new software where they have to learn about new “devils” for which they don’t know how to handle. I’m often reminded of the concept that “change isn’t always better.” So, in many situations, it’s better to not change. Maybe what you have isn’t very good, but if you’re not careful you could change to something even worse. That’s a real healthy fear.

That said, the fear can go too far. I’m reminded of when I had my first Android phone. I’d gone pretty cheap and gotten this really inexpensive phone. It worked, but was really slow. Plus, the battery barely lasted and it had plenty of devils I had to deal with whenever I used it. Luckily, I didn’t use it that much since I mostly work from home. However, when I was stuck in the depths of a massive exhibit hall at HIMSS and couldn’t get connectivity or I was waiting on the phone to do something, it was absolutely annoying.

The devils of that phone finally got to me and I upgraded to the Samsung S3. It was night and day difference. I must admit that I really didn’t know what I was missing. In many ways that was good, because it helped me to appreciate the upgrade. However, I’d kind of gotten complacent and was fine dealing with the “devils” I knew. (Side Note: Thanks to a few cracked screens from my wife and children, I’m now on the Samsung S5 and it’s awesome. The battery life itself is so compelling.)

Unfortunately, there’s no science to when to stick with the devils you know and when to upgrade. Without incentives, penalties or other regulations, there’s almost never a financial justification to upgrade software. It’s almost always cheaper to limp along with the old technology. However, there’s an extremely important sanity portion of the upgrade decision that is key.

I’ve personally found the time to upgrade and switch is when you know that the upgrade will solve the “sanity” issues you’re experiencing. If the upgrade won’t solve those issues, then it’s better to stick with the devil you know.

Healthcare IT Marketing

Posted on November 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m excited to tell you that we’ve officially announced the 2nd Annual Health IT Marketing and PR Conference happening May 7-8, 2015 in Las Vegas. We’ll do a full post in the future describing all the details, or you can check out the HITMC conference website for many of the details as well. It’s going to be the greatest gathering of healthcare marketing and PR executives that’s ever been done. People’s response to the first event has been amazing and I believe what we have planned for the second year will be even better. We hope we’ll see you there.

Here at EMR and HIPAA, we continue to grow and reach amazing new milestones. We just passed 10 Million pageviews on just EMR and HIPAA. We’ve done 2142 blog posts and you’ve contributed 9598 comments during that same time. Plus, I’m really excited that the Healthcare Scene blog network has over 29,500 Healthcare Scene email subscribers. I appreciate every reader that trusts us to provide thought leadership on the healthcare IT industry. We’ll keep doing everything we can to provide you value every day.

As part of our regular content, we’ve been working really hard on a number of amazing sponsored blog post series. They’ve been very well received by readers. I previously highlighted the content series that have been sponsored by Medical Management Corporation of America and The Breakaway Group. I’m sure that many of you have also enjoyed the recently started Cost Effective EHR Workflow Series that’s being sponsored by ClinicSpectrum. I’m looking forward to the amazing content these sponsored series provide readers.

Since our last post recognizing companies who support the work we do, we’ve had all of these great companies renew their sponsorships:
Ambir – Advertising since 1/2010
Cerner – Advertising since 9/2011
Canon – Advertising since 10/2012
gMed – Advertising since 8/2013
Colocation America – Advertising since 10/2013
Modernizing Medicine – Advertising since 1/2014

I’m extremely proud of those advertisers who’ve supported us for such a long time. Hard for me to believe that Ambir, for example, is about to reach their 5 year mark advertising on EMR and HIPAA.

A big thanks also goes out to our new sponsors. If you enjoy the content we create, take a minute to check out these companies and see if they can help you in your business:

HIPAA Secure Now! – I’ve written regularly about the need to do a proper HIPAA Risk Assessment in order to avoid any HIPAA penalties and to meet the meaningful use requirements. While you can do the HIPAA risk assessment in house, there’s some real value in having someone outside your organization being the one doing the HIPAA Risk Assessment. Avoids a conflict of interest. If you’re looking for someone to help you with your MU risk assessment, check out what HIPAA Secure Now has to offer.

Blue Horseshoe Network – I think their ad says it all. “Just Call Justina” if you need support for your EHR Go-Live, EHR Training or EHR optimization support. I’ve had a chance to interact with Justina myself and she’s got a lot of energy and passion for the work she does. Check out what Justina and Blue Horseshoe Network can do to help you in your EHR efforts.

Canon – You’ll see that Canon was listed in our renewing advertisers, but I wanted to highlight them here as well since they just started a big email sponsorship campaign with us. Canon is doing a lot of work to bring their fully integrated scanning solutions to healthcare organizations. We appreciate their support of our site and now our email lists as well.

You can get more details on how to get your company added to this list of EMR and HIPAA supporters. Just drop us a note on our contact us page. We’re happy to talk with you and your company about our sponsored content, display ads, email marketing, and webinar options. I think you’ll be impressed by the fully integrated email, SEO, display, and social marketing campaigns we provide.

Measuring Steps to Patient Empowerment – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on November 19, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jennifer Bergeron, Learning and Development Manager at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Jennifer Bergeron

Trends and fads come and go. When they stick, it’s clear they address a consumer need, whether it’s a service, promise, or hope. Here at The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company (TBG), we operate within a proven methodology that includes metrics, and it’s exciting to those of us who can’t get enough of good data. Most people find metrics interesting, especially when they understand how it relates to them, and the results are something they can control. Metrics are powerful.

To understand the power of data in shaping behaviors, consider the popularity of the self-monitoring fitness tracker or wearable technology. Even as their accuracy is scrutinized, sales in 2014 are predicted to land somewhere in the $14 billion range.1 Do mobile fitness trackers actually help people change their activity habits? Could doctors actually use the data to help their patients? Can companies be built on the concept of improving health with a wearable device? Not conclusively.2 Does a dedicated athlete need this kind of information? Some think not.3

So what is driving the growth of the fitness tracker market and what are these devices offering that creates millions of dedicated users? The answer is real-time data, personalized goals and feedback, and a sense of control; in other words, empowerment.

In the 70s and 80s, my grandparents spoke about their doctor as though he were infallible. They didn’t doubt, question, or even note what he prescribed, but took his advice and dealt with the outcomes. If healing didn’t progress as planned, my grandmother blamed herself, as though she’d failed him.

Jump ahead a few decades when more emphasis is being placed on collaboration. We expect our physicians to work with us, rather than dictate our treatment decisions.4 Section 3506 of the Affordable Care Act, the Program to Facilitate Shared Decision Making, states that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is “required to establish a program that develops, tests and disseminates certificated patient decision aids.”5 The intent is to provide patients and caregivers educational materials that will help improve communication about treatment options and decisions.6

Patient portals are important tools in helping to build this foundation of shared information. The portals house and track patient health data on web-based platforms, enabling patients and physicians to easily collaborate on the patient’s health management.7  Use of patient portals is a Meaningful Use Stage 2 objective.

The first measure of meeting this objective states that more than half the patients seen during a specified Electronic Health Record reporting period must have online access to their records. The second measure puts the spotlight on the patient and their use of that web-based information. MU Stage 2 requires that more than 5% of a provider’s patients must have viewed, downloaded, or transmitted their information to another provider in order for the provider to qualify for financial incentives from the Federal government.8

Empowered consumers want information immediately, whether it’s a restaurant review, number of steps taken in the last hour, how many calories they’ve burned, or their most recent checkup results. We like to weigh the input, make a decision, and then take action. Learning and information intake, no matter the topic, is expected to happen fast.

Metrics show us where we stand and how far we’ve come, which empowers us to keep going or make a change, and then measure again. We’re in an age of wanting to know but also wanting to know what to do next. The wearable device market has met a very real need of consumers. Whether or not fitness trackers make us healthier, whether or not our doctors know what to do with the information, or if this is information an athlete would really use, these devices can serve the purpose of putting many people in control of their own health, one measurable step at a time.

Sources:
1 Harrop, D., Das, R., & Chansin G. (2014) . Wearable technology 2014-2024: Technologies, markets, forecasts. Retrieved from http://www.idtechex.com/research/reports/wearable-technology-2014-2024-technologies-markets-forecasts-000379.asp

2 Hixon, T. (2014) . Are health and fitness wearables running out of gas? Retrieved from  http://www.forbes.com/sites/toddhixon/2014/04/24/are-health-and-fitness-wearables-running-out-of-gas/

3 Real athletes don’t need wearable tech. (2014) . Retrieved from http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-gear/gear-shed/tech-talk/Real-Athletes-Dont-Need-Wearable-Tech.html

4 Chen, P. (2012) . Afraid to speak up at the doctor’s office. Retrieved from  http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/31/afraid-to-speak-up-at-the-doctors-office/?_r=0

5 Informed Medical Decisions Foundation. (2011-2014) .  Affordable care act. Retrieved from http://www.informedmedicaldecisions.org/shared-decision-making-policy/federal-legislation/affordable-care-act/

6 HealthcareITNews. (2014) . Patient pjortals. Retrieved from http://www.healthcareitnews.com/directory/patient-portals

7 Bajarin, T. (2014) . Where wearable health gadgets are headed. Retrieved from http://time.com/2938202/health-fitness-gadgets/

8 HealthIT.gov. (2014) . Patient ability to electronically view, download & transmit (VDT) health information. Retrieved from http://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/achieve-meaningful-use/core-measures-2/patient-ability-electronically-view-download-transmit-vdt-health-information

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts. The Breakaway Group is a leader in EHR and Health IT training.