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EHR is the Fossil Fuel of Healthcare

Posted on December 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare has become completely dependent on EHR. There’s no getting around it.

In every organization that has an EHR, it’s the center of pretty much every healthcare providers work day. We’ve seen all the studies that talk about how much time doctors spend on the EHR. The problem I have with those studies is they never compare how much time doctors spent doing paper charts to the time they’re now spending on the EHR. However, these studies do also illustrate how integral the EHR has become in healthcare.

Expanding beyond the time spent on an EHR, could a hospital or medical practice get paid without an EHR today? I guess some medical practices still do, but if the EHR were to shut down healthcare organizations would largely stop being able to bill for the services they offer. Healthcare billing is completely dependent on the EHR.

Looking at this in a more positive light, EHR data is also the fuel of so many other exciting healthcare IT initiatives. Clinical decision support is all largely built into the EHR and on the back of EHR data. Much of the personalized medicine that is happening (except genomic medicine) is happening with EHR data. The same goes for population health analysis and all the healthcare analytics that are looking at ways to improve care and lower costs.

Is there any department in healthcare that doesn’t have a dependency on the EHR? I guess the cleaning staff don’t. However, that illustrates how dependent we are on EHR.

We could, of course, talk about whether this is a good or a bad thing for healthcare. I’m torn on this myself. We are completely dependent on the EHR, but it’s also a foundation for much of the innovation that is and will happen in healthcare. Plus, is dependency a problem when the thing you’re depending on is very reliable?

What could help this situation? The only real solution I can see is to create an environment where a healthcare organization could leave their EHR and go to another one if needed. This reduces the dependency and forces the EHR software provider to have to continually innovate so that you don’t want to leave to another vendor.

Unfortunately, we don’t have this in healthcare. In the hospital EHR world, I’m not sure we’ll ever get there. Once you spend $100+ million on an EHR, it’s pretty hard to justify ripping it out and putting in a new one.

What do you think about our dependency on EHR? Is it a good thing? Is it a bad thing? What can and should we do to make this situation better?

What’s Keeping HealthIT From Soaring to the Cloud? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on December 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/15 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave) on the topic of “What’s Keeping HealthIT From Soaring to the Cloud?.”

Premise and Private HealthIT architectures have ruled in healthcare and were unfortunately reinforced by the timing of ACA/HITECH. Infrastructure-as-a-Service, Platform-as-a-Service and other cloud-native approaches are revolutionizing all industries, and while for some somewhat valid reasons Healthcare has been slow to adopt the Cloud it’s now firmly ripe for transformation. So what are the forces keeping HealthIT from soaring to the Cloud? And how will cloud adoption in other industries and also within certain sectors of the healthcare landscape such as pharma and insurance give HealthIT the lift it needs to get off The Ground and into The Cloud?

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: How do premise and cloud-native HealthIT strategies differ? #HITsm

T2: What’s gained by moving HealthIT from premise-based designs to hosted, virtual and private cloud architectures? #HITsm

T3: What cyber-security concerns are keeping Cloud-native HealthIT from soaring? And how can these concerns be overcome? #HITsm

T4: Once HealthIT is truly in the Cloud what can HealthIT professionals see and do better than they can on ‘The Ground’? #HITsm

T5: What are the pros/cons of Cloud ‘dev-ops’ model and Ground ‘upgrade/migration’ IT deployment models? #HITsm

Bonus: How quickly will HealthIT professionals have to adopt pervasive Cloud-native HealthIT architectures? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

E-Patient Update: Clinicians May Be Developing Strong EMR Preferences

Posted on December 8, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Not long ago, I wrote about a story from another publication, one which engaged in a bunch of happy talk about how EMR companies were improving their user interfaces. At the time, I expressed a great deal of skepticism about this claim, suggesting that the vendors had misled the reporter into believing that user aspects of EMRs were changing for the better across the industry.

While I stand by my original skepticism to some degree, I have to say that I got a surprise recently when I heard some nurses discussing two major EMR platforms. The one they were using, they said, was awful and awkward to use. Apparently, they missed the other terribly.

Now, at the time I was a patient in the emergency department, so I didn’t have a chance to ask them any questions about their preferences, but I was struck by the conversation because I knew which vendors they were discussing. However, they could have been talking about any enterprise EMR.

Clinicians developing preferences

I don’t mention this exchange to praise one EHR over another. I bring this up merely because this is the first time, having spent a lot of time in medical environments due to chronic illness, that I’d heard any front-line clinician express a preference for one enterprise EMR over the other.

In the early days of widespread EMR adoption, I could scarcely find a clinician who didn’t hate the system they were working with, much less one who truly liked it and wanted to use it. Eventually, I began to find that many clinicians thought the system they worked with was more or less okay, though I rarely found any screaming fans for any system in particular.

Now, I’m arguing that we may be at a new stage in clinician adoption of EMRs. The point I am making is that now, some of the clinicians with whom I’ve had contact showing some enthusiasm about one EMR or another.

No big surprise: Experience breeds preference

The truth is, when you think about it, it’s not surprising that clinicians have finally developed preferences (rather than the lists of EMRs which they truly hate). After all, it’s been going on 10 years since the HITECH Act was passed and the money started to flow into EMR subsidies.

Since then, clinicians have had the opportunity to work with multiple EMR platforms at various facilities, and informally at least, develop a catalog of the strengths and weaknesses. Nurses and doctors know which interfaces they like, whether tech support tends to respond when they have a problem with the particular system, whether any analytics tools they provide are worth using and so on.

Given this fact it’s hardly surprising that they’ve figured out what they like and what they don’t, and which vendors seem to suit those needs. After this much time, why wouldn’t they?

As I see it, this is something of a turning point in the industry, a new moment in which clinical professionals have learned enough to know what they want from an EMR. I don’t know about you, but speaking as an e-patient, I think this is a very good thing. The more empowered clinicians feel, the better the work they will do.

The Benefits Of Creating Data Stewards

Posted on December 7, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Maybe I’m behind the times, but until today I’ve never heard of the notion of a “data steward” for healthcare organizations. An article I read today from the Journal of AHIMA IGIQ blog has given me some ideas on the subject to ponder, however.

The blog author lays out a role which combines responsibility for data structure and consistent data type definitions — in other words, which sees that datatypes are compared on an apples-to-apples basis and that data categories make sense and relate to each other appropriately.

In the article, “Data Stewards Play an Important Role in the Future of Healthcare,” writer Neysa Noreen, MS, RHIA, notes that providers are already struggling to categorize and describe types of medical data, much less leverage and benefit from them. But while we need to impose such a level of discipline, it isn’t easy, she notes.

“[Creating a workable data structure] it is a complex process with many challenges,” Noreen writes. “There are many data terms and concepts, roles and structures to decipher from information governance and data governance to data integrity,” which is why we need to put data stewards and place in many organizations, she suggests.

Though the idea of the data steward isn’t new, “emphasis on data comparison and quality has increased their necessity,” Noreen argues. “Data stewards are essential to ensure that standard data sets and definitions are implemented and used for data integrity and quality.”

The question then becomes what qualifications and skills a data steward should have. According to Noreen, data stewards aren’t necessarily IT experts. What they will need is to have a thorough understanding of the data itself and how to extract value from that data on the broadest level.

Data stewards will often turn out to be people who are already working with data in some other manner, which will allow them to know what organization needs to do to resolve discrepancies between data definitions, according to Noreen. Such a past also gives them a head start in figuring out how data can be organized and leveraged effectively into classes.

Given their knowledge of data standards and definitions, as well as a history of working with the data sets the organization has, data stewards will be in a good position to make data use more efficient. For example, they will be able to review and compare data requests on an institutional level, identifying data redundancy in finding opportunities for cost-efficiencies.

Having given this some thought, I find it hard to argue that most healthcare organizations could benefit from having a data steward in place. Providers may begin by starting with a committee that handles this function, rather than creating one or more dedicated positions, but eventually, the scope of such efforts will call for specialized expertise. Expect to see these positions pop up often in the future.

The Future Of Telemedicine Doesn’t Depend On Health Plans Anymore

Posted on December 6, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

For as long as I can remember, the growth of telemedicine depended largely on overcoming two obstacles: bandwidth and reimbursement. Now, both are on the verge of melting away.

One, the availability of broadband, has largely been addressed, though there are certainly areas of the US where broadband is harder to get than it should be. Having lived through a time when the very idea of widely available consumer broadband blew our minds, it’s amazing to say this, but we’ve largely solved the problem in the United States.

The other, the willingness of insurers to pay for telemedicine services, is still something of an issue and will be for a while. However, it won’t stay that way for too much longer in my opinion.

Yes, over the short term it still matters whether a telemedicine visit is going to be funded by a payer –after all, if a clinician is going to deliver services somebody has to pay for their time. But there are good reasons why this will not continue to be an issue.

For one thing, as the direct-to-consumer models have demonstrated, patients are increasingly willing to pay for telemedical care out-of-pocket. Customers of sites like HealthTap and Teladoc won’t pay top dollar for such services, but it seems apparent that they’re willing to engage with and stay interested in solving certain problems this way (such as, for example, getting a personal illness triaged and treated without having to skip work the next day).

Another way telemedicine services have changed, from what I can see, is that health systems and hospitals are beginning to integrate it with their other service lines as a routine part of delivering care. Virtual consults are no longer this “weird” thing they do on the side, but a standard approach to addressing common health problems, especially chronic illness.

Then, of course, there’s the most important factor taking control of telemedicine away from health plans: the need to use it to achieve population health management goals. While its use is still a little bit lopsided at present, as healthcare organizations aren’t sure how to optimize telehealth initiatives, eventually they’ll get the formula right, and that will include using it as a way of tying together a seamless value-based delivery network.

In fact, I’d go so far as to say that without the reach, flexibility and low cost of telehealth delivery, building out population health management schemes might be almost impossible in the future. Having specialists available to address urgent matters and say, for example, rural areas will be critical on the one hand, while making specialists need for chronic care (such as endocrinologists) accessible to unwell urban patients with travel concerns.

Despite the growing adoption of telemedicine by providers, it may be 5 to 10 years or so before it has its fullest impact, a period during which health plans gradually accept that the growth of this technology isn’t up to them anymore. But the day will without a doubt arise soon enough that “telemedicine” is just known as medicine.

EHR, Patient Portals and OpenNotes: Making OpenNotes Work Well – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on December 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/8 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from (@MyOpenNotes) on the topic of “EHR, Patient Portals and OpenNotes: Making OpenNotes Work Well.”

There are now nearly 100 health systems across the United States using secure patient portals to share visit notes with more than 20 million of their patients. And as the saying goes, if you’ve seen one OpenNotes implementation, you’ve seen one OpenNotes implementation.

No two health systems approach OpenNotes in the same way, and much of the variation stems from human resistance to change. Change is hard; whether it involves assuring and supporting clinicians in their move toward sharing notes or whether it’s surmounting technical challenges within the electronic health record.

We know the electronic health record is here to stay. We’re not going back to paper. And we know that when patients are offered online access to the medical information in their records, including access to notes, these patients continue to want that access and they share its benefits.

At their annual meeting in November 2017, the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) announced a formal collaboration with OpenNotes, stating, “The evidence-base is clear: providing patients access to their physician’s notes improves physician-patient communication and trust, patient safety, and perhaps even patient outcomes.”

So how do we bridge resistance to change? And as OpenNotes expands, how do we guide health systems to ensure the best possible patient experience?

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions. Homer Chin and Amy Fellows will be on hand to share key learnings from vendors and health IT teams that have been making OpenNotes work over the past few years.

Reference Materials:

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: What cultural barriers to OpenNotes adoption and use exist within the #healthcare IT profession vs. the clinical/medical community? #hitsm

T2: Given that OpenNotes is a movement and not a discrete software product, what are the technical challenges for implementing OpenNotes inside the patient portal? #hitsm

T3: If you’re currently implementing OpenNotes in your health system: What advice and/or cavetats can you share with colleagues? #hitsm

T4: If you haven’t implemented OpenNotes at your health system: What’s holding you back? What do you believe are the key challenges impeding implementation? #hitsm

T5: What customization strategies and/or tips do you have for helping patients navigate healthcare portals to find their #medical record notes? #hitsm

BONUS: What type of “OpenNotes-related” functionality should #EHR vendors be including in their product(s) to serve both clinicians AND patients? #hitsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/15 – What’s Keeing HealthIT from Soaring to the Cloud?
Hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave)

12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on November 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/1 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Gabe Charbonneau, MD (@gabrieldane) on the topic of “Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout.”

We live in confusing times. The marriage of technology and medicine is on the cusp of game changing breakthroughs. There is so much promise with deep learning/AI, big data, and the exponential growth in processing speed and storage, just to name a few. So, how is it that we are yet to get out of the dark ages when it comes to the EHR?

Physician burnout is a real problem. It seems like there is a new article put out weekly on the topic. Study after study points fingers of blame at the EHR. The pain from data entry and systems that don’t flow for clinicians is at an all time high. “Too many clicks”, and too many docs spending “pajama time” charting at home.

It has to get better.

While tech has been identified as a top contributor to the problem, it also has the potential to be a huge part of the solution.

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: Why is the EHR such a major driver of burnout in medicine? We’ve heard the common answers of “too many clicks” and increased clerical burden, but what else? Let’s dig deeper. #hitsm

T2: Who is happiest with their EHR and why? What can we learn from them? #hitsm

T3: What current technologies are the best for reducing EHR burnout? #hitsm

T4: What is the most exciting emerging technology for decreasing EHR burnout? #hitsm

T5: When should we expect to see the first wave of major improvements in EHR user experience for clinicians? What will it look like? #hitsm

Bonus: How can we take steps today to start moving the burnout needle in the right direction? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/8 – EHR, Patient Portals and OpenNotes: Making OpenNotes Work Well
Hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from @MyOpenNotes)

12/15 – What’s holding HealthIT from soaring to the Cloud?
Hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave)

12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Vanderbilt Disputes Suggestion That Larger Hospitals’ Data Is Less Secure

Posted on November 27, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Ordinarily, disputes over whose data security is better are a bit of a snoozer for me. After all, if you’re not a security expert, much of it will fly right over your head, and that “non-expert” group definitely includes me. But in this case, I think the story is worth a closer look, as the study in question seems to include some questionable assumptions.

In this case, the flap began in June, when a group of researchers published a study in JAMA Internal Medicine which laid out analysis of HHS statistics on data breaches reported between late 2009 to 2016. In short, the analysis concluded that teaching hospitals and facilities with high bed counts were most at risk for breaches.

Not surprisingly, the study’s conclusions didn’t please everyone, particularly the teaching-and high-bed-count hospitals falling into its most risky category. In fact, one teaching hospitals’ researchers decided to strike back with a letter questioning the study’s methods.

In a letter to the journal editor, a group from Nashville-based Vanderbilt University suggested that the study methods might hold “inherent biases” against larger institutions. Since HHS only requires healthcare facilities to notify the agency after detecting a PHI breach affecting 500 or more patients, smaller, targeted attacks might fall under its radar, they argued.

In response, the authors behind the original study admitted that the with the reporting level for PHI intrusions starting at 500 patients, larger hospitals were likely to show up in the analysis more often. That being said, the researchers suggested, large hospitals could easily be a more appealing target for cybercriminals because they possess “a significant amount of protected health information.”

Now, I want to repeat that I’m an analyst, not a cybersecurity expert. Still, even given my limited knowledge of data security research, the JAMA study raises some questions for me, and the researchers’ response to Vanderbilt’s challenge even more so.

Okay, sure, the researchers behind the original JAMA piece admitted that the HHS 500-patient threshold for reporting PHI intrusions skewed the data. Fair enough. But then they started to, in my view at least, wander off the reservation.

Simply saying that teaching hospitals and hospitals with more beds were more susceptible to data breaches simply because they offer big targets strikes me as irresponsible. You can’t always predict who is going get robbed by how valuable the property is, and that includes when data is the property. (On a related note, did you know that older Toyotas are far more likely to get stolen than BMWs because it’s easier to resell the parts?  When I read about that trend in Consumer Reports it blew my mind.)

Actually, the anecdotes I’ve heard suggests that the car analogy holds true for data assets — that your average, everyday cyber thief would rather steal data from a smaller, poorly-guarded healthcare organization then go up against the big guns that might be part of large hospitals’ security armament.

If nothing else, this little dispute strongly suggests that HHS should collect more detailed data breach information. (Yes, smaller health organizations aren’t going to like this, but let’s deal with those concerns in a different article.) Bottom line, if we’re going to look for data breach trends, we need to know a lot more than we do right now.

AMA Connects Doctors With Health IT Ventures

Posted on November 22, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she’s served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Maybe I’m wrong, but the following strikes me as coming straight from the Redundancy Department of Redundancy…but let’s see. Maybe I’m just being mean. Or maybe it’s because I just couldn’t taste The Rainbow in my last package of Skittles.

Anyway, recently AMA announced the launch of an online platform, the Physician Innovation Network (PIN), designed to connect physicians together with health tech firms.

The PIN will give HIT companies will have a straightforward channel for collecting physician input on the products and services they’re developing. The health IT ventures will also be able to search for physicians who have the expertise they need and are willing to exchange information with them. Meanwhile, the platform will help physicians to find paid and volunteer opportunities to work with health tech companies to work with the health take ventures that suit them.

In recent years, the AMA has taken several steps to bring the world of health IT and physicians closer together. Most recently, the trade group announced that it had created a data standardization organization known as the Integrated Health Model Initiative. The physician group and its partners say the new data model will include clinically-validated data elements designed to speed up the development of improved data organization, management, and analytics.

Its other HIT initiatives include:

  • Co-founding Health2047, a company designed (like PIN) to bring together physicians with established healthcare companies and help them launch useful services and products
  • Serving as one of four founding organizations behind Xcertia, an organization intended to foster knowledge about clinical content, usability, privacy, security and evidence of efficacy for mHealth apps
  • Managing a student-run biotechnology incubator in collaboration with Sling Health,

But what is there to say about PIN that distinguishes it from all of these efforts? It resembles Health2047, mais non? And what benefit does it add over LinkedIn? Specialty interest groups within the MGMA and HIMSS? AngelList? A giant digital corkboard and some virtual Post-It notes?

Don’t get me wrong, I know I’ve come down hard on the AMA’s product launch announcements rather often, perhaps too often. Depending on how it actually works, PIN may actually offer some incremental value over all of these other options. And hey, if the trade group wants to throw its money around, whom am I to say that they shouldn’t have at it.

The thing is, though, the AMA doesn’t work in a vacuum.

Look, as we all know, we’re absolutely drowning in initiatives and proposals and great new ideas for interoperability and the collection of consumer-generated health data. And don’t forget scoping out the best architecture for deploying two tin cans with a piece of string between them, getting budget approval from a Magic 8 Ball (signs point to no), and repurposing some BASIC code from a  Commodore 64 to develop your next mobile health app. (Yes, it tired me out to write that sentence but it was worth it.)

Silliness aside, when you have the kind of resources the AMA does, you want to the profession to say something meaningful when you open your mouth, professionally speaking. Other than that, you’re just sucking air out of the room that could be used for people with a differentiated idea in real value to deliver.  Hey, but other than that, the PIN announcement is just fine.

LTPAC – A Vibrant Hidden World

Posted on November 20, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

PointClickCare, makers of a cloud-based suite of applications designed for long-term post acute care (LTPAC), recently held its annual user conference (PointClickCare SUMMIT) in sunny Orlando, Florida. The conference quite literally shone a light on the LTPAC world – a world that is often overlooked by those of us that focus on the acute care side of healthcare. It was an eye-opening experience.

This year’s SUMMIT was the largest in the company’s history, attracting over 1,800 attendees from skilled nursing providers, senior living facilities, home health agencies and Continuing Care Retirement Communities. Over the three days of SUMMIT I managed to speak to about 100 attendees and every one of them had nothing but praise for PointClickCare.

“I couldn’t imagine doing my work without PointClickCare. I wouldn’t even know where to start if I had to use paper.”

“I don’t want to go back to the days before we had PointClickCare. We had so much paperwork back then and I used to spend an hour or two after my shift just documenting. Now I don’t have to. I track everything in the system as I go.”

“PointClickCare lets us focus more on the people in our care. We have the ability to do things that would have been impossible if we weren’t on an electronic system. We’re even starting to share data with some of our community partners.”

Contrary to what many believe, not every skilled nursing provider and senior living facility operates with clipboards and fax machines. “That’s one of the biggest misconceptions that people have of the LTPAC market,” says Dave Wessinger, Co-Founder and CTO at PointClickCare. “Almost everyone assumes that LTPAC organizations use nothing but paper or a terrible self-built electronic solution. The reality is that many have digitized their operations and are every bit as modern as their acute care peers.”

According to a recent Black Book survey, 19 percent of LTPAC providers have now adopted some form of an Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. In 2016, Black Book found the adoption rate was 15 percent. The Office of the National Coordinator recently published a data brief that showed adoption of EHRs by Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) had reached 64% in 2016.

Although these numbers are low compared to the +90% EHR adoption rate by US hospitals, it does indicate that there are many pioneering LTPAC providers that have jumped into the digital world.

“It’s fun to be asked by our clients to work with their acute care partners,” explains BJ Boyle, Director of Product Management at PointClickCare. “First of all, they are surprised that a company like PointClickCare even exists. They are even more surprised when we work with them to exchange health information via CCD.”

Boyle’s statement was one of many during SUMMIT that opened my eyes to the innovative technology ecosystem that exists in LTPAC. Further proof came from the SUMMIT exhibit hall where no less than 72 partners had booths set up.

Among the exhibitors were several that focus exclusively on the LTPAC market:

  • Playmaker. A CRM/Sales solution for post-acute care.
  • Hymark. A technical consultancy that helps LTPAC organizations implement and optimize PointClickCare.
  • Careserv. A LTPAC cloud-hosting and managed services provider.

And some with specialized LTPAC offerings:

  • Care.ly. An app that helps families coordinate the care of their elderly loved ones with senior care facilities.
  • McBee Associates. Financial and revenue cycle consultants that help LTPAC organizations.

I came away from SUMMIT with a newfound respect for the people that work in LTPAC. I also have a new appreciation for the innovative solutions being developed for LTPAC by companies like PointClickCare, Care.ly and Playmaker. This is a vibrant hidden world that is worth paying attention to.

Note: PointClickCare did cover travel expenses for Healthcare Scene to be able to attend the conference.