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Practical Application of Watson with EHR

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Ever since Watson made its debut on Jeopardy, I haven’t been able to not check out what Watson was doing next. No doubt what Watson did on Jeopardy was impressive. However, it’s one thing to do what it did on Watson. It’s another thing to commercialize the Watson into something useful.

I’d long been hearing that Watson was going to be great for healthcare IT and that healthcare would really benefit from the technology. However, everything I saw felt very conceptual as opposed to practical and implemented. So, I was really interested in talking with Modernizing Medicine about their EHR integration with Watson.

You can find my interview with Daniel Cane and Dr. Michael Sherling, Founders of Modernizing Medicine, talking about Watson and some of the other cool ways they’re trying to help doctors make use of the data in an EHR in the video below. Plus, we even talk ICD-10 and MU 2 delay as well.

Note: Modernizing Medicine is a Healthcare Scene advertiser.

July 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

EHR Vendors Need to Expand Their Definition of Customer Service

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Living in Las Vegas I likely have a skewed idea of what customer service means. In the tech world, we have Zappos headquarters in downtown Las Vegas. Most of you are likely familiar with Zappos unique approach to customer service. They really have taken customer service to the next level and created an entire company culture around the customer service they provide. The same could be said for the experience that the various casinos on the strip offer their customers. They do a really amazing job at most casinos providing an amazing customer service experience.

With this background, I find it really smart of Kareo to open an office in Las Vegas. Although, that’s not really the point of this post. Instead, I want to focus on the idea that most EHR vendors need expand their idea of customer service.

As I look at the world of EHR customer service I see so many organization lacking. Certainly we see examples of terrible EHR customer service that include calling into a call center in another country where the person doesn’t speak English and has no power to actually solve a user’s problems (Disclaimer: I don’t have a problem with call centers in other countries if they are well trained and can actually solve problems). Of course, the same thing can apply to a call center in the US who can’t solve the users’ actual problems. Both are terrible customer service and a problem in the industry. However, there’s a far more painful problem that I don’t think most EHR vendors consider a part of their customer service plan and 99% of EHR vendors have done terrible at this.

Adding new features and accommodating an EHR user’s feature request is just as much a part of the EHR customer service experience as the person who answers the phone. I can assure you that every EHR vendor out there would get rated an F the past few years when it comes to this form of EHR customer service. Why do I know this? I know this because every EHR vendor has been focused on meaningful use that they haven’t had the time to add any meaningful EHR user feature requests and features outside of meaningful use.

This isn’t EHR vendors’ fault. The end users have required it and EHR vendors have had to spend the time doing it. However, EHR customer service has suffered as a consequence. Don’t believe me. Look through all the EHR press releases that have been released over the past couple years. Find me the plethora of press releases that talk about the innovations that EHR vendors have created for their end users that aren’t related to meaningful use. I get the press releases and they’re MIA.

That’s not to say that EHR vendors have done nothing for end users. They’ve made some incremental progress on a few things, but meaningful use has zapped their development time. Stage 2 was even worse. I look forward to the new day where EHR vendors can focus on great customer service and EHR features and not just MU.

July 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

What If Your EHR Only Had 25 Doctors?

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I recently had lunch with an EHR vendor that had an extremely small number of providers. I’ve known this EHR vendor for about 5 years, so this isn’t a new EHR vendor that’s trying to establish themselves in the industry. Instead they’ve focused on having a small, nimble team that’s focused on making the EHR work the right way for the doctors. It’s a novel approach I know, but pretty interesting that his business can survive with so few providers. Also worth noting is that the EHR is certified for meaningful use stage 2 as well.

Now think for a minute how the development process of an EHR vendor would be better if your EHR only had 25 doctors (For the record, the EHR vendor above has a few more than 25 doctors). Would it be much easier to satisfy just 25 physician users? Imagine the personalized service you could provide your users.

One of the real challenges I’ve seen with EHR vendors is that when they’re small, they are extremely responsive to their end users and the end users are very happy. As the EHR vendor grows, they lose that personal touch with the end users and many of those originally happy end users become dissatisfied with their EHR experience.

The problem with scaling an EHR user base is that you can’t make everyone happy. You have to make compromises that will be great in some people’s eyes and terrible in another person’s mind. What large EHR vendors do to try and solve this problem is they create configurable options that allow the end user to customize their system to meet their personal needs. Problem solved, right?

The problem with these configurations is two fold. First, you can’t make everything configurable. Once you go down the path of making everything configurable, it never ends. There’s always something else that could be made more configurable. So, the culture of configurability leads to unsatisfied users who can’t customize everything (even if what they want to customize shouldn’t matter).

Second, if everything is configurable, then it makes the implementation that much more complex. I’ve written before about the need for EHR vendors to have great “out of the box” user experience, but balancing that with allowing the user to configure everything that’s needed. This is a real challenge and most fail. Just look at the number of high priced EHR consulting companies out there. Many of them could better be defined as EHR configuration companies since the configuration needs are so large and complex.

Returning to where we started, when you’re an EHR vendor with 25 doctors you don’t have to build in all the flexibility and configurability. You’re small enough that as an EHR vendor you can do any needed customizations and configurations for the end user. Plus, with this kind of personalized service you can charge a little extra as well.

When you look at EHR development, there’s a spectrum of approaches starting with a fully in house, custom designed EHR through a fully outsourced EHR that can apply to any organization or specialty. In many ways a 25 doctor EHR has a lot of the same benefits of a fully custom EHR software, but spreads the costs of development across more doctors.

As a business, maybe a 25 doctor EHR company won’t dominate the world. Maybe they won’t have a huge exit to some other company or an IPO. However, that doesn’t mean it’s not a great small business if it’s doing something you love. Once you get World Domination out of your sites, it changes a lot of things about how you do business.

July 18, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

My EHR User Conference Keynote – Where is EHR and Healthcare IT Headed?

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Last month I was invited to give the keynote address at the gMed EHR User Conference. For those not familiar with gMed, it’s a Gastro focused EHR company out of Florida. Along with giving the keynote address, I loved the chance to mix and mingle with doctors, practice managers, and gMed’s staff to learn from them. No doubt, their experiences and insights will inform my future posts.

gMed was nice enough to have their videographer record my presentation so I could share it with all of you. I had many people come up to me after the presentation and say very nice things including invitations to come and speak other places. I’ve embedded the video recording below. Hopefully many of you will enjoy my talk as well.

Also, here are the slides I used for my presentation (Note: I don’t just read my slides so some of them might not make sense without the audio):

Full Disclosure: gMed is an advertiser on Healthcare Scene.

July 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Meaningful Use Audits, RAC Audits, and HIPAA Audits

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The following is a guest post by Barry Haitoff, CEO of Medical Management Corporation of America.
Barry Haitoff
Healthcare has always been a deeply regulated industry, so in many ways healthcare organizations are already used to dealing with government scrutiny. However, we’ve recently seen a number of new audit programs hit the healthcare world that didn’t exist even a few years ago. Here’s a look at a few of them you should be prepared for.

Meaningful Use Audits
This is one of the newest audit programs to hit healthcare. Depending on your attestation history, it could have a tremendous impact on your organization’s financial health. These EHR incentive audits have been happening across every size organization and are conducted by the CMS hired auditing firm, Figliozzi and Company of Garden City, N.Y. If you get a letter or email from Figliozzi you’ll know what it is right away. An EHR incentive audit is a big deal since the meaningful use program is all or nothing. If they find even one thing wrong with your meaningful use attestation, you could lose ALL of your EHR incentive money.

CMS recently released an informative guidance document outlining the supporting documentation needed for an EHR incentive audit. Pages 4 and 5 of the document go through the self-attestation objectives and others detailing the audit validation and suggested documentation needed for each. If you’ve attested to meaningful use, then you’ll want to take some time to go through the document to make sure you can provide the necessary documentation if needed. In many cases this simply includes dated screenshots to prove measure completion. While many EHR vendors can be helpful in the meaningful use audit process, you should not totally rely on them.

In a recent blog post, Jim Tate makes a compelling case for why you might want to consider doing a mock EHR incentive audit and how to make sure that the audit is effective. Although smaller organizations won’t likely be able to afford an outside audit, having it done by someone in your organization that wasn’t involved in the attestation is beneficial. The CMS guidance document could be used as a guide. A mock audit could help discover any potential issues and help you put mitigation strategies in place before you have a real audit and your hands are tied.

Recovery Audit Contractor (RAC) Audits
RAC audits are currently on hold as CMS works to improve the program and deal with the enormous audit backlog. We still haven’t heard from CMS about when the RAC audits will resume, but we should hear something later this summer. While no RAC audits are occurring right now, that doesn’t mean that once the RAC audits resume, the claims you’re filing today can’t and won’t be audited.

The best thing you can do to be prepared for RAC audits is to make sure that your documentation and billing ducks are in a row. A great place to start is to look at your most common denials and look at how you can improve your clinical documentation, coding and billing for each of these denials. Also, make sure that your process for responding to audits is standardized and effective. The RAC audit is just one example of an audit performed by payers. Don’t be surprised if you’re subjected to audits from other agencies or commercial payers.

RAC audits recovered billions of dollars in overpayments in recent years. You can be sure that they will continue and that other similar initiatives are coming our way. There’s just too much incentive for the government not to do it.

HIPAA Audits
The US Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights (HHS OCR) first started doing HIPAA audits as part of a 2011 pilot program. It’s fair to say that HHS OCR’s audit program was one of discovery as much as it was of compliance. However, the HITECH Act and Omnibus Rule have started to up the ante when it comes to enforcement of HIPAA. HHS OCR announced that they’d be surveying 800 covered entities and 400 business associations to select the next round of audit subjects. An OCR Spokesperson said, “We hope to audit 350 covered entities and 50 BAs in this first go around.”

Unlike previous audits that were done by KPMG, these HIPAA audits will be done by OCR staff. One area that these audits will likely focus on is the HIPAA Security Risk Assessment. The importance of doing this cannot be understated and is illustrated by the fact that it’s a requirement for meaningful use. I will be surprised if these audits don’t also focus on the new HIPAA Omnibus Rule requirements. I’m sure many of the HIPAA audits will catch organizations that never updated their HIPAA policies to comply with HIPAA Omnibus.

Summary
No one enjoys an audit of any sort. However, being well prepared for an audit will provide some level of comfort to yourself and your organization. Now is your opportunity to make sure you’re well prepared for these audits that could be coming your way. These audit programs likely aren’t going anywhere, so take the time to make sure you’re prepared.

Medical Management Corporation of America, a leading provider of medical billing services, is a proud sponsor of EMR and HIPAA.

July 14, 2014 I Written By

EHR Incentive Market Share Charts Worth A Thousand Words

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One thing I really love about the government lately is their goal to be as transparent as possible. Certainly they still have a ways to go, but I think healthcare has done some significant things when it comes to transparency into the government health programs. A great example of this is the Health IT Dashboard which has all of the data for the various health IT programs.

I don’t want to steal Carl Bergman’s thunder, because he’s already posted some really interesting Hospital EHR market share data and his previous EHR market share data. Plus, he’s planning to dive into the meaningful use market share data next. I love the approach of multiple sources when it comes to evaluating EHR market share and so I look forward to his analysis of EHR incentive market share against the EHR adoption market share from Definitive Healthcare and SK&A.

Until then, I thought I’d give you a taste of the EHR vendor participation in the EHR incentive program. This data comes from the ONC dashboards listed above and are put into some really nice snapshots of the data by ONC.

First up is the data for EHR vendor attestations by eligible professionals (ie. ambulatory doctors):
EHR Incentive Market Share - Eligible Professionals

And the EHR vendor attestations by hospitals:
EHR Incentive Market Share - Hospitals

It’s worth noting that the above data is just the EHR incentive money data. No doubt the actual EHR adoption data would have a few differences and include some companies in specialties that don’t qualify for EHR incentive money. Not to mention specialty specific EHR vendors who likely don’t make the chart even if they dominate their specialty. These charts do serve as an interesting proxy for EHR market share that’s worthy of discussion even if it doesn’t paint the full picture. Plus, even more important will be to watch the change in these numbers over time.

With that disclaimer, we could analyze this data a lot of ways. I’ll just offer a few interesting insights I noticed. First, 711 vendors have been used in the ambulatory EHR incentive program. That’s a lot of vendors. Only 78 of those 711 supply secondary EHRs as opposed to the primary EHR. 452 EHR vendors supply a primary EHR to less than 100 eligible professionals. 200 EHR vendors supply a primary EHR to fewer than 10 eligible professionals. These observations and a comparison of the ambulatory versus hospital EHR incentive charts’ “Other Vendors” shows how fragmented the ambulatory EHR market share is right now.

I was also intrigued that Mitochon Systems, Inc. was on the list even though they shut down their Free EHR software in May 2013. They had white labeled their EHR software to a number of other companies and so it will be interesting to see how that number evolves. I assume they sold the software to those companies, but I hadn’t heard an update.

On the hospital side of things, MEDITECH certainly doesn’t get the credit they deserve for the size of their install base. The same goes for CPSI, MEDHOST and Healthland. I think their problem is that people only want to read about the Mayo, Cleveland Clinic, and Kaiser’s of the world and so the articles about Billings Montana Hospital (I made that hospital up) rarely happen. I should find more ways to solve that since the small hospital market is huge.

I do wish that there was a way to divide the ambulatory chart into hospital owned ambulatory practices and independent ambulatory practices. That would paint an even clearer picture of that market.

What do you think of these charts? What can we learn from them?

July 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Is Healthcare So Complex That It Can’t Be Fixed with the Existing Parts?

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In one of my recent discussions I had someone suggest the following idea:

You can’t model a solution to fix healthcare with the existing parts.

I found this to be a really intriguing idea that is worthy of some deep consideration by those of us involved in healthcare. I’ve often talked with people about the many perverse incentives that exist in our current healthcare system. There are so many incentives that point us the wrong way that the idea that we can’t model a solution to our healthcare cost problem makes a lot of sense to me.

Of course, I don’t think that this means we shouldn’t have hope that healthcare can’t be fixed. It just means that the fix will be much harder and that it will likely come from outside of the current healthcare system. You need to change the healthcare model to really dramatically improve our healthcare system.

I’m certainly bias, but I think that technology will serve as the basis for any new model. Unfortunately, most of the technology that’s been applied to healthcare is more about trying to make the current model more efficient as opposed to disrupting the current model. A great example of this is the EHR. As I posted previously, the EHR is not disruptive and never will be.

That’s not to say that the EHR doesn’t have value or benefits. There are a lot of benefits to EHR, but it won’t be the disruptive change that healthcare needs. I’ll be interested to see what mix of technologies, policies, and pressures lead to a really disruptive change in how we deliver healthcare.

While I’m optimistic that something will come that will really change the quality and efficiency of our healthcare, it’s not going to be an easy path.

July 7, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

FDA EMR Regulation, EMR Jobs, and EMR Supports Fraud?

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I’ve written up my thoughts on the FDA regulating EMR. I hope the FDA stays far away from EMR.


There are lots of EMR jobs out there. If you’re looking for a better job or a first time health IT job, check out Healthcare IT Central.


This makes for a good headline, but let’s be honest about the fraud that’s happening. It was happening without EMR. Plus, I think that much of the increased reimbursement is more about doctors finally billing appropriately and not fraud. That’s something that many people don’t want to face. Certainly there is plenty of fraud in healthcare, but I think overall EMR software is going to better help track it down versus causing more fraud. What do you think?

July 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Your EHR Vendor Isn’t Certified: Remove Barriers and Conquer Meaningful Use Stage 2

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I wrote previously about the “Triple Aim” of healthcare and even questioned if doctors really cared about the triple aim. For those not familiar with the triple aim, it includes: improving the health of our country, enabling less expensive care, and increasing patient engagement with their healthcare. All of these are noble goals and worthy of effort. Plus, even if providers aren’t moved by this goal, that doesn’t mean that much of the legislation and regulation that hits healthcare won’t be guided by this triple aim.

I was reading through this Allscripts whitepaper titled “Your EHR Vendor Isn’t Certified: Remove Barriers and Conquer Meaningful Use Stage 2” when I thought about how the triple aim is going to impact an organization’s decisions moving forward whether they like it or not.

The whitepaper underscores the shift towards more patient engagement, smart EHR tools, and population health. I think that generally summarizes meaningful use and is why it’s going to be really important that everyone in healthcare is involved in it.

Even if you don’t want to participate in the meaningful use program specifically, the overall trends that meaningful use represent are likely going to be with us for the foreseeable future. No doubt the government’s focus will continue this direction and I think payers are heading the same direction as well. They probably won’t adopt meaningful use entirely, but elements from it and other programs will likely be adopted by payers.

Check out the full whitepaper for more details on these trends and making sure your EHR is ready for them.

July 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 14 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

HIPAA Slip Leads To PHI Being Posted on Facebook

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HHS has begun investigating a HIPAA breach at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center which ended with a patient’s STD status being posted on Facebook.

The disaster — for both the hospital and the patient — happened when a financial services employee shared detailed medical information with father of the patient’s then-unborn baby.  The father took the information, which included an STD diagnosis, and posted it publicly on Facebook, ridiculing the patient in the process.

The hospital fired the employee in question once it learned about the incident (and a related lawsuit) but there’s some question as to whether it reported the breach to HHS. The hospital says that it informed HHS about the breach in a timely manner, and has proof that it did so, but according to HealthcareITNews, the HHS Office of Civil Rights hadn’t heard about the breach when questioned by a reporter lastweek.

While the public posting of data and personal attacks on the patient weren’t done by the (ex) employee, that may or may not play a factor in how HHS sees the case. Given HHS’ increasingly low tolerance for breaches of any kind, I’d be surprised if the hospital didn’t end up facing a million-dollar OCR fine in addition to whatever liabilities it incurs from the privacy lawsuit.

HHS may be losing its patience because the pace of HIPAA violations doesn’t seem to be slowing.  Sometimes, breaches are taking place due to a lack of the most basic security protocols. (See this piece on last year’s wackiest HIPAA violations for a taste of what I’m talking about.)

Ultimately, some breaches will occur because a criminal outsmarted the hospital or medical practice. But sadly, far more seem to take place because providers have failed to give their staff an adequate education on why security measures matter. Experts note that staffers need to know not just what to do, but why they should do it, if you want them to act appropriately in unexpected situations.

While we’ll never know for sure, the financial staffer who gave the vengeful father his girlfriend’s PHI may not have known he was  up to no good. But the truth is, he should have.

July 1, 2014 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.