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Integrating Telemedicine And EMRs

Posted on May 17, 2013 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Have you considered what an EMR would look and feel like if it integrated telemedicine? Rashid Bashshur, director of telemedicine at the University of Michigan Health System, has given the idea a lot of thought.

In an interview with InformationWeek Healthcare, Bashshur tells IW’s Ken Terry that it’s critical to integrate HIEs, ACOs, Meaningful Use and electronic health records.

Makes sense in theory. How would it work?

To begin with, Bashshur said, healthcare providers who have virtual encounters with patients via a telehealth set-up should create an electronic health record for that patient.  The record could then be ported over to the patient’s PHR.  The physician can also share the health record via an HIE with other providers.

When providers attempt mobile and home monitoring, it steps the complexity up a notch, as such activities generate a large flow of data. The key, in this situation, is to use the EMR to sensitively filter incoming data.

Unfortunately, few EMRs today can easily pinpoint the information providers need to process, so most organizations have nurse care managers sift through incoming monitoring data. That’s the case at University of Michigan Health System, where care managers sift data manually to determine whether patients seem to be seeing changes in their conditions.

Unfortunately, even attentive care managers can’t catch everything a properly-designed system can, Bashshur notes.  To integrate EMRs and telemedicine/remote monitoring, it will be important for EMRs to have sophisticated filters in place which can pinpoint trouble spots in a patient’s condition, using a standard protocol which is applied uniformly.

According to InformationWeek, vendor eClinicalWorks has promised a new feature which can pick out relevant data from a large data stream. But until eCW or another EMR vendor produces such a feature, it seems that remote monitoring will be labor-intensive and expensive.

Analytics-Driven Compassionate Healthcare at El Camino Hospital

Posted on March 25, 2013 I Written By

Mandi Bishop is a healthcare IT consultant and a hardcore data geek with a Master's in English and a passion for big data analytics, who fell in love with her PCjr at 9 when she learned to program in BASIC. Individual accountability zealot, patient engagement advocate, innovation lover and ceaseless dreamer. Relentless in pursuit of answers to the question: "How do we GET there from here?" More byte-sized commentary on Twitter: @MandiBPro.

Given its location in the heart of Silicon Valley, it may not be remarkable that El Camino Hospital was the first hospital in the US to implement EMR. What IS remarkable is that El Camino implemented EMR 51 years ago, leveraging an IBM mainframe system that Lockheed Martin refactored for healthcare from its original intended use for the space program.

Take a moment to process that. El Camino didn’t need PPACA, Meaningful Use, HITECH, or HIPAA to tell them health data is critical. El Camino saw the value in investing in healthcare IT for electronic data capture and communication without federal incentive programs or lobbyists. With that kind of track record of visionary leadership, it’s no wonder they became early analytics program adopters, and recently turned to Health Care DataWorks (HCD) as a trusted partner.

When I sat down with executive leadership from El Camino and HCD to discuss the journey up Tom Davenport‘s analytics maturity scale from rudimentary operational reporting to advanced analytics, I expected a familiar story of cost pressure, clinical informatics, quality measure incentives or alternative payment models as the business drivers for new insights development. Instead, I heard the burgeoning plan for a visionary approach to patient engagement and “analytics-driven compassionate care”.

Greg Walton, CIO of El Camino Hospital, admitted that initial efforts to implement an analytics program had resulted in “textbook errors”: “’Competing on Analytics’ was easier to write than execute,” he said. Their early efforts to adopt and conform to a commercially-available data model were hindered by the complexity of the solution and the philosophy of the vendor. “One of the messages I would give to anybody is: do NOT attempt this at home,” Greg laughed, and El Camino decided to change their approach. They sought a “different type of company…a real-life company with applicable lessons learned in this space.”

“The most important thing to remember in this sector: you’re investing in PEOPLE. This is a PEOPLE business,” Greg said. “And that if there’s any aspect of IT that’s the most people-oriented, it’s analytics. You have to triangulate between how much can the organization absorb, and how fast they can absorb it.” In HCD, El Camino found an analytics organization partner whose leadership and resources understand healthcare challenges first, and technology second.

To address El Camino’s need for aggregated data access across multiple operational systems, HCD is implementing their pioneering KnowledgeEdge Enterprise Data Warehouse solution,including its enterprise data model, analytic dashboards, applications and reports. HCD’s technology, implementation process, and culture is rooted in their deep clinical and provider industry expertise.

“The people (at HCD) have all worked in hospitals, and many still work there occasionally. Laypersons do not have the same understanding; HCD’s exposure to the healthcare provider environment and their level of experience provides a differentiator,” Greg explained. HCD impressed with their willingness to roll up their sleeves and work with the hospital stakeholders to address macro and micro program issues, from driving the evaluation and prioritization of analytics projects to identifying the business rules defining discharge destination. And both the programmers and staff are “thrilled,” Greg says: “My programmers are so happy, they think they’ve died and gone to heaven!”

This collaborative approach to adopting analytics as a catalyst for organizational and cultural change has lit a fire to address the plight of the patient using data as a critical tool. Greg expounded upon his vision to achieve what Aggie Haslup, Vice President of Marketing for HCD, termed “analytics-driven compassionate care”:

We need to change the culture about data without losing, and in fact enhancing, our culture around compassion. People get into healthcare because they’re passionate about compassion. Data can help us be more compassionate. US Healthcare Satisfaction scores have been basically flat over the last 10 years. Lots of organizations have tried to adopt other service industry tools: LEAN,6S; none of those address the plight of the patient. We’ve got to learn that we have to go back to our roots of compassion. We need to get back to the patient, which means “one who suffers in pain.” We want (to use data) to help understand more about person who’s suffering. My (recent) revelation: what do you do w/ guests in your house? Clean the house, put away the pets, get food, do everything you can to make guests comfortable. We want to know more about patients’ ethnicity, cultural heritage, the CONTEXT of their lives because when you’re in pain, what do you fall back on? Cultural values. We want a holistic view of the patient, because we can provide better, compassionate care through knowing more about patients. We want to deploy a contextual longitudinal view of the patient…and detect trends in satisfaction with demographics, clinical, medical data.

What a concept. Imagine the possibilities when a progressive healthcare provider teams with an innovative analytics provider to harness the power of data to better serve the patient population. I will definitely keep my eye on this pairing!

HIMSS Analytics Clinical & BI Maturity Model

Posted on March 14, 2013 I Written By

Mandi Bishop is a healthcare IT consultant and a hardcore data geek with a Master's in English and a passion for big data analytics, who fell in love with her PCjr at 9 when she learned to program in BASIC. Individual accountability zealot, patient engagement advocate, innovation lover and ceaseless dreamer. Relentless in pursuit of answers to the question: "How do we GET there from here?" More byte-sized commentary on Twitter: @MandiBPro.

While the theme of HIMSS 2013 may have been, “How Great Is Interoperability,” the effectiveness of the many facets of interoperability are only as good as the actionable value of the shared data. The clinical insights that should be enabled by Meaningful Use Stage 2+ are expected to drive market trends in myriad areas of the healthcare system: chronic disease management, targeted member interventions, quality measures. In order to assess organizational readiness to capitalize on the promise of Meaningful Use, HIMSS Analytics began measuring the implementation and adoption of EMR and clinical documentation using a maturity model called EMRAM.

EMRAM

But, in analytics terms, EMRAM’s results are simply targeted foundational reporting, answering the question, “WHAT happened with Meaningful Use EMR adoption criteria.” So, you’ve got your clinical data in an EMR. Now what are you able to DO with it?

In 2013, HIMSS Analytics is taking a broader approach with the introduction of a new Clinical Business Intelligence maturity model, creating a framework to benchmark participating providers’ analytics maturity level.

I’ve been fortunate to know James Gaston, Senior Director of HIMSS Analytics Clinical & Business Intelligence, for many years, going back to his days with Arkansas Blue Cross. His appreciation for BI initiatives is matched only by his enthusiasm for the first day of turkey hunting season. When I ran into him at TDWI’s BI World summit in Orlando in November, he acted like a kid on Christmas morning, telling me about the brave new world of clinical data management that he was about to tackle. The excitement continued to build in the months leading up to HIMSS. James was practically glowing when we spoke about the upcoming C&BI Maturity Model release.

“Our customers are interested in not just understanding how to deploy IT applications, but how effectively they’re using those applications to support clinical business intelligence, as well as analytical pursuits,” James said. “So, HIMSS Analytics partnered with IIA to create and present a Clinical & BI Maturity Model that helps healthcare organizations measure that level of effectiveness.”

Sarah Gates, the VP of Research for IIA (the International Institute of Analytics), elaborated. “The HIMSS Analytics C&BI Maturity Model leverages the Competing on Analytics DELTA model, developed by Tom Davenport, which measures not only how well you’re using data and technology, but how well you’re building an analytical organization.” There are 5 core competency measurements in the DELTA model that will inform the HIMSS Analytics C&BI analysis: Data, Enterprise, Leadership, Targets, and Analysts. The methodology is holistic, touching on the cultural aspects of the organization as well as the technical, allowing a longitudinal view of the organization’s analytics program. A yardstick value from 1-5 will be assigned to each respondent based on Davenport’s criteria for each core competency.

Although HIMSS Analytics will eventually offer Level 1-5 certification program for those organizations with observed results for analytics, James and Sarah agreed that it is not appropriate for every provider to reach for the Level 5 gold star. Per Sarah, “Healthcare is an industry just starting to discover analytics. We’re expecting to see lots of practitioners that are emerging in use of analytics, so we believe it (survey results) will be heavy on the lower end of the maturity scale. Data warehouse capabilities and staffing career paths for data analysts will be key differentiators for mature programs.” Not all providers have the resources – financial, human, and/or technical – to attain advanced analytics nirvana, and James wants to insure that these providers don’t feel as if they’ve “failed”; the goal is to baseline against the peer group, identify opportunities for improvement, and focus on what is possible for each individual organization, working within their constraints.

What can we expect to see at next year’s C&BI survey results presentation? James said, “We want to be able to talk about benchmarking the industry as a whole, helping healthcare find its way with clinical business intelligence and begin to understand how important it is, and where opportunities lie Everyone’s talking about clinical and BI – it is the opportunity to realize savings in healthcare, to use information to empower people to make better decisions.”

So, it’s up to you, providers and technology partners. You’ve implemented your EMR, achieved a high adoption rate across your organization’s core clinical processes, attested to Meaningful Use Stage 2, achieved Stage 7 on the HIMSS EMRAM scale, perhaps even participated in multi-HIE CCD medical records sharing with other provider networks. You’ve got the data in-house and availabe. It’s time to see how ready you are to rise to the analytics challenge and maximize your return on those EMR and HIE investments.

Attempt to beat your previous Doug Fridsma long jump.

Note: for the complete HIMSS 2013 Leadership Survey Results, please download PDF here.

What Would ONC’s Dr. Doug Fridsma Do? (THIS Geek Girl’s Guide to HIMSS)

Posted on March 2, 2013 I Written By

Mandi Bishop is a healthcare IT consultant and a hardcore data geek with a Master's in English and a passion for big data analytics, who fell in love with her PCjr at 9 when she learned to program in BASIC. Individual accountability zealot, patient engagement advocate, innovation lover and ceaseless dreamer. Relentless in pursuit of answers to the question: "How do we GET there from here?" More byte-sized commentary on Twitter: @MandiBPro.

I know you’ve all been wondering how I’m planning to spend my mad crazy week at HIMSS in New Orleans. Well, maybe not ALL of you, but perhaps at least one – who is most likely my blog boss, the master John Lynn. Given the array of exciting developments in healthcare IT across the spectrum, from mobile and telehealth to wearable vital sign monitoring devices, EMR consolidation to cloud-based analytics platforms, it’s been extraordinarily difficult to keep myself from acting like Dori in “Finding Nemo”: “Oooooh! Shiny!” I’ve had to remind myself daily that I will have an opportunity to play with everything that catches my eye, but that I am only qualified to write and speak intelligently on my particular areas of expertise. And so, I’m proud to say I’ve finally solidified my agenda for the entire week, and I cannot WAIT to go ubergeek fan girl on so many industry luminaries and fascinating up-and-comers making great strides towards interoperability, deriving the “meaning” in “Meaningful Use” from clinical data, and leveraging the power of big data analytics to improve quality of patient experience and outcomes.

On Sunday, I’m setting the stage for the rest of the week with a sit-down with ONC’s Director of Standards and Interoperability and Acting Chief Scientist, Dr. Doug Fridsma. His groundbreaking work in interoperability spans multiple initiatives, including: the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) and the CONNECT project, as well as the Federal Health Architecture. For insight into his passion for transforming the healthcare system through health IT, check out his blog: From The Desk of the Chief Science Officer.

Through the rest of the week, I aspire to see the world through Dr. Fridsma’s eyes, focusing on how each of the organizations and individuals contribute to the standards-based processes and policies that form the foundation for actionable analytics – and improved health. I’ve selected interviews with key visionaries from companies large and small, who I feel are representative of positive forward movement:

Health Care DataWorks piques my interest as an up-and-comer to watch, empowering healthcare systems to improve outcomes and reduce medical costs by providing accelerated EDW design and implementation, whether on-premise or via SaaS solution. Embedded industry analytics models supporting alternative network models, population-based payment models, and value-based purchasing allow for rapid realization of positive ROI.

Emdeon, is the single largest clinical, financial, and administrative network, connecting over 400,000 providers and executing more than seven billion health exchanges annually. And if that’s not enough to attract keen attention, they recently announced a partnership with Atigeo to provide intelligent analytics solutions with Emdeon’s PETABYTES of data.

Serving an area near and dear to my heart, Clinovations provides healthcare management consulting services to stakeholders at each link in the chain, from providers to payers and supporting trading partners – in areas from EMR implementation (and requisite clinical data standards) to market and vendor assessments, and data management activities throughout. With the dearth in qualified SME resources in the clinical data field, I look forward to learning about how Clinovations plans to manage their growth and retain key talent.

Who doesn’t love a great legacy decommissioning story? Mediquant proports adopting their DataArk product can result in an 80% reduction in legacy system costs through increased interoperability across disparate source systems and consolidated access. The “active archiving” solution allows for a centralized repository and consolidated accounting functions out of legacy data without continuing to operate (and support) the legacy system. Longitudinal clinical records? Yes, please!

Those are just a few on my must-see list, and I think Dr. Doug Fridsma would be proud of their vision, and find alignment to his ONC program goals. But will he be proud of their execution?

Can’t wait to find out, on the exhibit hall floor – and in the hallway conversations, and the client case study sessions, and the general scuttlebutt – at HIMSS!

Interoperability, Clinical Data, and The Greatest Generation

Posted on February 21, 2013 I Written By

Mandi Bishop is a healthcare IT consultant and a hardcore data geek with a Master's in English and a passion for big data analytics, who fell in love with her PCjr at 9 when she learned to program in BASIC. Individual accountability zealot, patient engagement advocate, innovation lover and ceaseless dreamer. Relentless in pursuit of answers to the question: "How do we GET there from here?" More byte-sized commentary on Twitter: @MandiBPro.

As a healthcare IT zealot and wanna-be policy wonk, I find myself mired in acronyms, and surrounded (and indulged) by those who understand my rapid-fire Klingon-esque rants on BETOS and LOINC and HCPCS. The larger concepts of interoperability and meaningful use lose the forest for the trees of IHE standard definitions and specific quality measures. Have we lost sight of the vast majority of the healthcare consumers, and their level of understanding and awareness of those larger concepts? Could you explain HL7 ORUs or CCDs to your great-grandma?

I recently visited my 90 year-old grandparents, both remarkably healthy multiple cancer survivors who show no signs of slowing down, and have maintained enough mobility to continue bowling 3 times a week. After an evening of pinochle, my grandma asked me to please help her understand what it is that I DO for a living. We’ve had this conversation before.

“I’m a healthcare technology consultant, Grandma. I work with insurance companies and doctors to help them get all your information.”

Puzzled look.

“When you go to the doctor, Grandma, do they write anything down on paper, or are they using a computer when they talk to you?”

“Oh, they’re always on those computers! Tap-tap-tap. Every question I answer and they tap-tap-tap.”

She illustrates by typing on her lap, and I confirm that she’s a hunt-and-peck person. She stops only after I finish asking my next question.

“Do you have private insurance, or do you use the VA?”

“I have Blue Cross. Your grandpa uses the VA.”

“How many doctors did you have to see for your blood infection?”

“FOUR! Sometimes two in one day!”

“Did they all have to ask you for your history?”

“No – they already had it, on their computer. They even knew about my mastectomy, 30 years ago. One corrected me on the date; I’d thought it was only 20 years ago.”

“Well, Grandma, when you booked your appointment with the first doctor, their computer system automatically requested your medical records from your insurance company. And the insurance company automatically sent your records back to the computer. After the first doctor made notes on your visit, just after you walked out the door, the computer sent an updated copy of your medical records back to the insurance company, and it ordered the lab tests you needed before you went to the next doctor. Then, the lab automatically sent your results to the insurance company AND the doctor who ordered the tests.”

“But the other doctors had the test results.”

“Yes, ma’am. Each time you made an appointment with a new doctor, that doctor’s computer requested your medical records from the insurance company, and the insurance company sent out the most recently updated information. It only takes a minute!”

“Goodness. So, do you build the computer programs that make all that work?”

Eyes wide. THIS impresses her.

“No.”

Puzzled look again, so I quickly continue.

“But I make sure those computer programs can talk to each other, and that the insurance company can make sense out of what they’re saying.”

“Because if they couldn’t talk to each other, I’d have to haul a suitcase from doctor to doctor with my chart?”

“Yes, ma’am. That’s called ‘interoperability’. There are new rules for how doctors’ computers should talk to each other, and to the insurance companies. And I get to work with the insurance company to do other really cool stuff. I take a look at LOTS of people’s medical records to find patterns that might help us catch diseases before they happen.”

“And what’s that called?”

“Clinical informatics. It’s my favorite thing to do, because I get to study lots and lots and LOTS of information. That’s called ‘big data’.”

“Sweetheart, you lost me with the computer words. But I’m just so happy you’re happy!”

She hugs me and grins, and I finally feel like I’ve found the right way to talk about my passion: through use cases. Although, Grandma would call them stories.

And there you have it: the importance of interoperability and clinical data, through the eyes of The Greatest Generation. Check in next year for an update on whether my definitions stuck!

EMRs Can Spark Creativity

Posted on June 15, 2012 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Today I’ve been letting a few curious little theories germinate in my head. So I thought I might try out an idea on you good folks.  For those who have read my previous rants about breaking a doctor’s workflow, this may seem rather contrary, but hey, we can always duke it out later.

Yesterday, I went to see a specialist who’s a member of a decent sized practice (about a dozen docs, give or take).  The office is completely paper-based, efficiently and elegantly if my patient’s eye view is any indication.  The practice is something of a zoo — super-high volume — but I seldom if ever feel rushed or impatient.  In other words, we’re talking what looks like a pretty well-run shop from the pre-EMR era.

When I saw my doctor, we puzzled together a bit over a medical issue I’m facing, one which could be drug-induced or could be organic.  We spent some time talking about standard solutions and how to manage them and then, boom, my specialist had an inspiration.  We agreed that I should taper off one medication and begin the other shortly.

Luckily for me, my doctor was engaged and seemed interested in digging into the problem.  But in other cases, realistically, I might have gotten a physician that stuck blindly to the obvious and didn’t dig up what might be a slightly unconventional solution.

Here’s where I contradict myself to some degree.  In past essays, I’ve written on how inelegant and undesirable it can be to break physicians’ workflow for the sake of squeezing an EMR into place. I’ve argued that EMRs should be designed for physicians and not for administrators. And so on.

This encounter, however, convinced me that when EMRs break passive, standard workflows, it could be a spur to creativity in some cases.  In the right situation, if the doctor I saw was distracted or bored, the EMR could throw second line solutions at him or her just when they were ready to e-prescribe and sign off on the visit. (Yeah, a “do you want to leave this chart now?” prompt with a med recommendation might be annoying, but it could be productive!)

Of course, no system can force a physician to engage if they simply don’t want to do so, or don’t have time to think. But if the system is designed right, maybe the changes EMRs engender can lead to fresh ideas, better grasp of details or just a reminder on a bad day.  At least I hope so. What do you think?

Major EMR Vendor Consolidation On The Verge

Posted on June 14, 2012 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Note: This is a post by Katherine Rourke. Tomorrow watch for a post by John on EMR and EHR where he discusses some of his views on this discussion.

While it may not be immediately obvious, the EMR industry is at a major turning point in its history. Any day now, we’re going to see a bunch of mergers and acquisitions go off like a string of firecrackers, some of which may have a direct impact on your business.

Now, I don’t know how many EMR companies there are out there. In fact, I’m not sure anyone has a precise count. But can we agree that we’re looking at 1,000 or more, no?  And, heck, there’s probably thousands of companies pitching practice management + EMR,  medication management systems, clinical decision support, apps, mobile health plug-ins to EMRs and so on. Just visualize it all — you’ll get a headache but you’ll doubtless agree that we’re dealing with a raging flood of technology.

And most of it won’t stand alone forever. Every vendor likes to say that their product line has all the solutions, but even the most green sales rep doesn’t really believe that. Smart EMR tech firms and their natural allies are already beginning the mating dance, and quietly but inexorably, hooking up.

Since this isn’t the Wall Street Journal, I’m sure we don’t need to dig into deep financial discussion over this. And anyone who’s a regular reader of this site knows why software companies often buy rather than build the technologies they need to fill out their portfolio.

But I thought it was still worth noting that within, say, 18 months, the EMR world could look fairly different in the following ways:

* EMRs aimed at doctors are overabundant, to put it mildly. I predict that there will be a dozen or so well-publicized failures or buyouts in this space within the next year.

* Big vendors that pitch to both enterprises and medical practices will largely have to pick one,and it’s the enterprise side that will win. If you’re a doctor running a giant company’s EMR, stay in regular touch with your vendor and get their support promises in writing!

* There will be a flurry of mHealth activity, with EMRs that play nicely on tablets in center stage.  It’s possible the market will even support another IPO or two this year by EMR vendors if they’re offering a nifty mobile health aspect integrated with their core product.

* Doctors, in particular, risk finding that their product becomes abandonware this year as the market consolidates.  Have a Plan B available, and I mean a written plan developed by a consultant or tech-savvy senior member of your team.

So, what else do you think will happen as the market absorbs excess players and recombines relationships?

Are We Ready For ACOs? Security, Process Issues Abound

Posted on June 13, 2012 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Accountable Care Organizations are starting to emerge and solidify, though they still seem to be mostly the efforts of large integrated health systems dancing with large medical groups and partner hospitals with very strong IT departments.  In other words, ACOs don’t seem to be for the weak or poorly funded, at least not yet.

The business issues these entities face (aligning physicians with global goals, most particularly) are complicated and taxing enough. Once you’ve gotten those initiatives in motion, it’s time to interoperate and share data. After all, you have a better chance of accomplishing them if your group shares health data freely and uses advanced functions of EMRs to track collective clinical progress.

The thing is, even big, mature IDNs with a tightly-knit ACO group are still struggling with physician alignment and, as we all know, getting what they need from their EMR and health data exchange.

Given how hard creating consensus and sharing interoperable data is, it’d be nice to end the critique right there. But the truth is, shared goals and shared systems are just one layer of the problem.

One thing I don’t hear much of is serious discussion as to the security issues that open up when you share data across the porous borders of ACO partner organizations.

Now, I am neither a lawyer nor an engineer (IANALOE), so I’m not going to attempt to articulate any long list of specific security problems. But just because IANALOE doesn’t mean I can’t see the obvious:  Data shared widely is data exposed, unless you’ve got some great solutions in place.

Moreover, data shared among even partnered ACO organizations will pass through some organizations that have trained their staff effectively in HIPAA compliance, and others where the training was minimal or didn’t take.  This is a problem that must be faced by HIEs in any event, but even  more when providers need to manage at the case level, doing deep dives into patient records rather than skimming summaries and drug lists.

I’m not suggesting that ACOs don’t work — actually, I think they can perform very well — but I am suggesting that we aren’t taking the process and security issues as seriously as we should.  I do hope solutions to these problems emerge as ACOs refine their business models.  If not, I see some serious crashes in the future.

New Ways Of Leveraging EMRs For Quality Measurement

Posted on June 7, 2012 I Written By

Katherine Rourke is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Helping to measure care quality is supposed to be one of the best tricks EMRs can do. After all, EMRs can round up data in seconds that would take weeks or months to abstract from a paper chart. More importantly, they can pick up patterns that paper charts don’t contain, such as the speed at which some behaviors take place.

The thing is, most providers are still taking little advantage of EMRs’ quality research functions, according to a new study published in the International Journal for Quality in Health Care.  Researchers point out that while EMRs can capture many classes information, most of the time users are limiting themselves to measures lifted from paper-based research studies. They propose creating a new set of measurements known as electronic quality measures, or e-QMs.  Here’s how Information Week summarizes the measures:

Translated e-QMs. Measures designed for use with paper records, such as whether patients with diabetes have received HbA1c tests. These measures can use claims data or information from chart abstraction, as well as EHRs.

–Health IT-assisted. Measures that could be derived from non-EHR data sources, such as blood pressure or body mass index information, but that require EHRs for reporting on 100% of a patient population.

–Health IT-enabled. Metrics that take advantage of an EHR’s features, such as the percentage of abnormal test results read and acted upon by a clinician within 24 hours of receipt, or the percentage of relevant clinical alerts that are acted upon.

–Health IT system management. Measures of how providers use health IT systems, such as the percentage of all prescriptions ordered via electronic prescribing.

–E-iatrogenesis. Measures of patient harm caused at least in part by the health IT system, such as the percentage of patients for whom the wrong drug was ordered because of an error in an e-prescribing system, or the percentage of critical lab findings that did not lead to patient notification.

This sounds pretty neat, and with any luck, most providers will end up using their EMRs to conduct more-thorough measurements of this type.  At the moment, though, less than a quarter of all care is “substantially documented,” and only half of U.S. doctors have some form of EHR, according to the researchers.

In the mean time, let’s hope providers who do have advanced EMR installations are taking steps like these. They make a lot of sense.

Guest Post: Overcoming EMR Integration Challenges

Posted on September 15, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Dan Neuwirth is the CEO of MedCPU, provider of the innovative MedCPUAdvisor™ platform: with applications for decision support for clinical guidelines, Meaningful Use, and care pathways, that captures the complete clinical picture in real time, including narrative text and structured data to deliver the most accurate clinical and compliance guidance.

There’s no question that healthcare needs to adopt new technology that makes us more effective and efficient and curbs costs, like Electronic Medical Records (EMR) solutions and Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems. In today’s world, providers of all sizes continue to find it challenging to integrate existing HIT systems with EMRs for a variety of reasons. As our industry evolves, technology solutions need to be smarter and empower seamless integration.

EMR and HIPAA guest author Susan White covers in depth how a lack of connectivity standards affects EMR integration. There are no mandated standards for EMR vendors to follow, making it hard to coordinate data sharing between medical devices and other systems (including from one EMR to another), even at the same facility. As those systems operate in disparate fashions, critical clinical information is often lost or stuck in silos. Most importantly, the information is not where clinicians need it most–at their fingertips, in an exam room, with a patient.

This lack of data sharing is a pervasive concern. One Markle report finds that roughly 80 percent of both consumers and physicians demand that hospitals and doctors be required to share information that improves coordination of care, cuts unnecessary costs, and reduces medical errors.

In 2010, more than $88 Billion were spent on developing and implementing EHRs, health information exchanges (HIEs) and other health IT initiatives. When you consider that the average 10-physician practice spends more than $137,000 per year on prior authorizations and pharmacy callbacks alone, you’ll have to agree that the lack of data integration and sharing get very costly. And although I agree with John Halamka, who recently wrote these challenges exist because healthcare is inherently more complicated than other industries, I am a strong believer that a lot of them can be overcome by the use of smart technology.

We need smart, flexible solutions, which capitalize on existing technologies and require minimal integration. Technologies that employ advanced screen extraction, for example, empower several important improvements in the clinical decision support space such as the capturing and analysis of both free and structured text. A lot of time such solutions are rendered ineffective as they either lack compatibility with leading EMR systems or are too hard to integrate.

As the industry evolves, developing robust protocols for capturing both structured and unstructured data along with standards for data integration and sharing will become increasingly important. With all the data points created on patients every day, we will need a consistent, secure, and reliable way to capture and share patient data among all systems and healthcare providers. What is your experience? What are top data capturing and integration challenges faced by your organization? Looking forward to continuing the dialog and hearing your feedback.