Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

Hands-On Guidance for Data Integration in Health: The CancerLinQ Story

Posted on June 15, 2017 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Institutions throughout the health care field are talking about data sharing and integration. Everyone knows that improved care, cost controls, and expanded research requires institutions who hold patient data to safely share it. The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s CancerLinQ, one of the leading projects analyzing data analysis to find new cures, has tackled data sharing with a large number of health providers and discovered just how labor-intensive it is.

CancerLinQ fosters deep relationships and collaborations with the clinicians from whom it takes data. The platform turns around results from analyzing the data quickly and to give the clinicians insights they can put to immediate use to improve the care of cancer patients. Issues in collecting, storing, and transmitting data intertwine with other discussion items around cancer care. Currently, CancerLinQ isolates the data from each institution, and de-identifies patient information in order to let it be shared among participating clinicians. CancerLinQ LLC is a wholly-owned nonprofit subsidiary of ASCO, which has registered CancerLinQ as a trademark.

CancerLinQ logo

Help from Jitterbit

In 2015, CancerLinQ began collaborating with Jitterbit, a company devoted to integrating data from different sources. According to Michele Hazard, Director of Healthcare Solutions, and George Gallegos, CEO, their company can recognize data from 300 different sources, including electronic health records. At the beginning, the diversity and incompatibility of EHRs was a real barrier. It took them several months to figure out each of the first EHRs they tackled, but now they can integrate a new one quickly. Oncology care, the key data needed by CancerLinQ, is a Jitterbit specialty.

Jitterbit logo

One of the barriers raised by EHRs is licensing. The vendor has to “bless” direct access to EHR and data imported from external sources. HIPAA and licensing agreements also make tight security a priority.

Another challenge to processing data is to find records in different institutions and accurately match data for the correct patient.

Although the health care industry is moving toward the FHIR standard, and a few EHRs already expose data through FHIR, others have idiosyncratic formats and support older HL7 standards in different ways. Many don’t even have an API yet. In some cases, Jitterbit has to export the EHR data to a file, transfer it, and unpack it to discover the patient data.

Lack of structure

Jitterbit had become accustomed to looking in different databases to find patient information, even when EHRs claimed to support the same standard. One doctor may put key information under “diagnosis” while another enters it under “patient problems,” and doctors in the same practice may choose different locations.

Worse still, doctors often ignore the structured fields that were meant to hold important patient details and just dictate or type it into a free-text note. CancerLinQ anticipated this, unpacking the free text through optical character recognition (OCR) and natural language processing (NLP), a branch of artificial intelligence.

It’s understandable that a doctor would evade the use of structured fields. Just think of the position she is in, trying to keep a complex cancer case in mind while half a dozen other patients sit in the waiting room for their turn. In order to use the structured field dedicated to each item of information, she would have to first remember which field to use–and if she has privileges at several different institutions, that means keeping the different fields for each hospital in mind.

Then she has to get access to the right field, which may take several clicks and require movement through several screens. The exact information she wants to enter may or may not be available through a drop-down menu. The exact abbreviation or wording may differ from EHR to EHR as well. And to carry through a commitment to using structured fields, she would have to go through this thought process many times per patient. (CancerLinQ itself looks at 18 Quality eMeasures today, with the plan to release additional measures each year.)

Finally, what is the point of all this? Up until recently, the information would never come back in a useful form. To retrieve it, she would have to retrace the same steps she used to enter the structured data in the first place. Simpler to dump what she knows into a free-text note and move on.

It’s worth mentioning that this Babyl of health care information imposes negative impacts on the billing and reimbursement process, even though the EHRs were designed to support those very processes from the start. Insurers have to deal with the same unstructured data that CancerLinQ and Jitterbit have learned to read. The intensive manual process of extracting information adds to the cost of insurance, and ultimately the entire health care system. The recent eClinicalWorks scandal, which resembles Volkswagon’s cheating on auto emissions and will probably spill out to other EHR vendors as well, highlights the failings of health data.

Making data useful

The clue to unblocking this information logjam is deriving insights from data that clinicians can immediately see will improve their interventions with patients. This is what the CancerLinQ team has been doing. They run analytics that suggest what works for different categories of patients, then return the information to oncologists. The CancerLinQ platform also explains which items of data were input to these insights, and urges the doctors to be more disciplined about collecting and storing the data. This is a human-centered, labor-intensive process that can take six to twelve months to set up for each institution. Richard Ross, Chief Operating Officer of CancerLinQ calls the process “trench warfare,” not because its contentious but because it is slow and requires determination.

Of the 18 measures currently requested by CancerLinQ, one of the most critical data elements driving the calculation of multiple measures is staging information: where the cancerous tumors are and how far it has progressed. Family history, treatment plan, and treatment recommendations are other examples of measures gathered.

The data collection process has to start by determining how each practice defines a cancer patient. The CancerLinQ team builds this definition into its request for data. Sometimes they submit “pull” requests at regular intervals to the hospital or clinic, whereas other times the health care provider submits the data to them at a time of its choosing.

Some institutions enforce workflows more rigorously than others. So in some hospitals, CancerLinQ can persuade the doctors to record important information at a certain point during the patient’s visit. In other hospitals, doctors may enter data at times of their own choosing. But if they understand the value that comes from this data, they are more likely to make sure it gets entered, and that it conforms to standards. Many EHRs provide templates that make it easier to use structured fields properly.

When accepting information from each provider, the team goes through a series of steps and does a check-in with the provider at each step. The team evaluates the data in a different stage for each criterion: completeness, accuracy of coding, the number of patients reported, and so on. By providing quick feedback, they can help the practice improve its reporting.

The CancerLinQ/Jitterbit story reveals how difficult it is to apply analytics to health care data. Few organizations can afford the expertise they apply to extracting and curating patient data. On the other hand, CancerLinQ and Jitterbit show that effective data analysis can be done, even in the current messy conditions of electronic data storage. As the next wave of technology standards, such as FHIR, fall into place, more institutions should be able to carry out analytics that save lives.

Scenarios for Health Care Reform (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on May 18, 2017 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The first part of this article suggested two scenarios that could promote health care reform. We’ll finish off the scenarios in this part of the article.

Capitalism Disrupts Health Care

In the third scenario, reform is stimulated by an intrepid data science firm that takes on health care with greater success than most of its predecessors. After assembling an impressive analytics toolkit from open source software components–thus simplifying licensing–it approaches health care providers and offers them a deal they can’t refuse: analytics demonstrated to save them money and support their growth, all delivered for free. The data science firm asks in return only that they let it use deidentified data from their patients and practices to build an enhanced service that it will offer paying customers.

Some health care providers balk at the requirement to share data, but their legal and marketing teams explain that they have been doing it for years already with companies whose motives are less commendable. Increasingly, the providers are won over. The analytics service appeals particularly to small, rural, and safety-net providers. Hammered by payment cuts and growing needs among their populations, they are on the edge of going out of business and grasp the service as their last chance to stay in the black.

Participating in the program requires the extraction of data from electronic health records, and some EHR vendors try to stand in the way in order to protect their own monopoly on the data. Some even point to clauses in their licenses that prohibit the sharing. But they get a rude message in return: so valuable are the analytics that the providers are ready to jettison the vendors in a minute. The vendors ultimately go along and even compete on the basis of their ability to connect to the analytics.

Once stability and survival are established, the providers can use the analytics for more and more sophisticated benefits. Unlike the inadequate quality measures currently in use, the analytics provide a robust framework for assessing risk, stratifying populations, and determining how much a provider should be rewarded for treating each patient. Fee-for-outcome becomes standard.

Providers make deals to sign up patients for long-term relationships. Unlike the weak Medicare ACO model, which punishes a provider for things their patients do outside their relationship, the emerging system requires a commitment from the patient to stick with a provider. However, if the patient can demonstrate that she was neglected or failed to receive standard of care, she can switch to another provider and even require the misbehaving provider to cover costs. To hold up their end of this deal, providers find it necessary to reveal their practices and prices. Physician organizations develop quality-measurement platforms such as the recent PRIME registry in family medicine. A race to the top ensues.

What If Nothing Changes?

I’ll finish this upbeat article with a fourth scenario in which we muddle along as we have for years.

The ONC and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services continue to swat at waste in the health care system by pushing accountable care. But their ratings penalize safety-net providers, and payments fail to correlate with costs as hoped.

Fee-for-outcome flounders, so health care costs continue to rise to intolerable levels. Already, in Massachusetts, the US state that leads in universal health coverage, 40% of the state budget goes to Medicaid, where likely federal cuts will make it impossible to keep up coverage. Many other states and countries are witnessing the same pattern of rising costs.

The same pressures ride like a tidal wave through the rest of the health care system. Private insurers continue to withdraw from markets or lose money by staying. So either explicitly or through complex and inscrutable regulatory changes, the government allows insurers to cut sick people from their rolls and raise the cost burdens on patients and their employers. As patient rolls shrink, more hospitals close. Political rancor grows as the public watches employer money go into their health insurance instead of wages, and more of their own stagnant incomes go to health care costs, and government budgets tied up in health care instead of education and other social benefits.

Chronic diseases creep through the population, mocking crippled efforts at public health. Rampant obesity among children leads to more and earlier diabetes. Dementia also rises as the population ages, and climate change scatters its effects across all demographics.

Furthermore, when patients realize the costs they must take on to ask for health care, they delay doctor visits until their symptoms are unbearable. More people become disabled or perish, with negative impacts that spread through the economy. Output decline and more families become trapped in poverty. Self-medication for pain and mental illness becomes more popular, with predictable impacts on the opiate addiction crisis. Even our security is affected: the military finds it hard to recruit find healthy soldiers, and our foreign policy depends increasingly on drone strikes that kill civilians and inflame negative attitudes toward the US.

I think that, after considering this scenario, most of us would prefer one of the previous three I laid out in this article. If health care continues to be a major political issue for the next election, experts should try to direct discussion away from the current unproductive rhetoric toward advocacy for solutions. Some who read this article will hopefully feel impelled to apply themselves to one of the positive scenarios and bring it to fruition.

Scenarios for Health Care Reform (Part 1 of 2)

Posted on May 16, 2017 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

All reformers in health care know what the field needs to do; I laid out four years ago the consensus about patient-supplied data, widespread analytics, mHealth, and transparency. Our frustration comes in when trying to crack the current hide-bound system open and create change. Recent interventions by US Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act, whatever their effects on costs and insurance coverage, offer no promise to affect workflows or treatment. So this article suggests three potential scenarios where reform could succeed, along with a vision of what will happen if none of them take hold.

Patients Forge Their Own Way Forward

In the first scenario, a tiny group of selfer-trackers, athletes, and empowered patients start a movement that ultimately wins over hundreds of millions of individuals.

These scattered enthusiasts, driven to overcome debilitating health problems or achieve extraordinary athletic feats, start to pursue self-tracking with fanaticism. Consumer or medical-grade devices provide them with ongoing data about their progress, and an open source platform such as HIE of One gives them a personal health record (PHR).

They also take charge of their interactions with the health care system. They find that most primary care providers aren’t interested in the data and concerns they bring, or don’t have time to process those data and concerns in the depth they need, or don’t know how to. Therefore, while preserving standard relationships with primary care providers and specialists where appropriate, the self-trackers seek out doctors and other providers to provide consultation about their personal health programs. A small number of providers recognize an opportunity here and set up practices around these consultations. The interactions look quite different from standard doctor visits. The customers, instead of just submitting themselves to examination and gathering advice, steer the conversation and set the goals.

Power relationships between doctors and customers also start to change. Although traditional patients can (and often do) walk away and effectively boycott a practice with which they’re not comfortable, the new customers use this power to set the agenda and to sort out the health care providers they find beneficial.

The turning point probably comes when someone–probabaly a research facility, because it puts customer needs above business models–invents a cheap, comfortable, and easy-to-use device that meets the basic needs for monitoring and transmitting vital signs. It may rest on the waist or some other place where it can be hidden, so that there is no stigma to wearing it constantly and no reason to reject its use on fashion grounds. A beneficent foundation invests several million dollars to make the device available to schoolchildren or some other needy population, and suddenly the community of empowered patients leaps from a miniscule pool to a mainstream phenomenon.

Researchers join the community in search of subjects for their experiments, and patients offer data to the researchers in the hope of speeding up cures. At all times, the data is under control of the subjects, who help to direct research based on their needs. Analytics start to turn up findings that inform clinical decision support.

I haven’t mentioned the collection of genetic information so far, because it requires more expensive processes, presents numerous privacy risks, and isn’t usually useful–normally it tells you that you have something like a 2% risk of getting a disease instead of the general population’s 1% risk. But where genetic testing is useful, it can definitely fit into this system.

Ultimately, the market for consultants that started out tiny becomes the dominant model for delivering health care. Specialists and hospitals are brought in only when their specific contributions are needed. The savings that result bring down insurance costs for everyone. And chronic disease goes way down as people get quick feedback on their lifestyle choices.

Government Puts Its Foot Down

After a decade of cajoling health care providers to share data and adopt a fee-for-outcome model, only to witness progress at a snail’s pace, the federal government decides to try a totally different tack in this second scenario. As part of the Precision Medicine initiative (which originally planned to sign up one million volunteers), and leveraging the ever-growing database of Medicare data, the Office of the National Coordinator sets up a consortium and runs analytics on top of its data to be shared with all legitimate researchers. The government also promises to share the benefits of the analytics with anyone in the world who adds their data to the database.

The goals of the analytics are multi-faceted, combining fraud checks, a search for cures, and everyday recommendations about improving interventions to save money and treat patients earlier in the disease cycle. The notorious 17-year gap between research findings and widespread implementation shrinks radically. Now, best practices are available to any patient who chooses to participate.

As with the personal health records in the previous scenario, the government database in this scenario creates a research platform of unprecedented size, both in the number of records and the variety of participating researchers.

To further expand the power of the analytics, the government demands exponentially greater transparency not just in medical settings but in all things that make us sick: the food we eat (reversing the rulings that protect manufacturers and restaurants from revealing what they’re putting in our bodies), the air and water that surrounds us, the effects of climate change (a major public health issue, spreading scourges such as mosquito-borne diseases and heat exhaustion), disparities in food and exercise options among neighborhoods, and more. Public awareness leads to improvements in health that lagged for decades.

In the next section of this article, I’ll present a third scenario that achieves reform from a different angle.

What’s a Patient?

Posted on May 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For quite a while I’ve been pushing the idea that healthcare needs to move beyond treating patients. Said another way, we need to move beyond just helping people who have health problems which are causing them to complain and move into treating patients that otherwise feel healthy.

Said another way, Wanda Health once told me “The definition of a healthy patient is someone who’s not been studied long enough.”

If you look long enough and hard enough, we all have health issues or we’re at risk for health issues. There’s always something that could be done to help all of us be healthier. That’s a principle that healthcare hasn’t embraced because our reimbursement models are focused on treating a patients’ chief complaint.

In another conversation with NantHealth, they suggested the idea that we should work towards knowing the patient so well that you know the treatment they need before you even physically see the patient.

These two ideas go naturally together and redefine our current definition of patient. In the above context, all of us would be considered patients since I have little doubt that all of us have health issues that could be addressed if we only knew the current state of our health better.

While NantHealth’s taken a number of stock hits lately for overpromising and under delivering, the concept I heard them describe is one that will become a reality. It could be fair to say that their company was too early for such a big vision, but it’s inspiring to think about creating technology and collecting enough data on a patient that you already know how to help the patient before they even come into the office. That would completely change the office visit paradox that we know today.

This is an ambitious vision, but it doesn’t seem like a massive stretch of the imagination either. That’s what makes it so exciting to me. Now imagine trying to do something like this in the previous paper chart world. Yeah, it’s pretty funny to just even think about it. Same goes with what we call clinical decision support today.

AMIA Shares Recommendations On Health IT-Friendly Policymaking

Posted on April 17, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

The American Medical Informatics Association has released the findings from a new paper addressing health IT policy, including recommendation on how policymakers can support patient access to health data, interoperability for clinicians and patient care-related research and innovation.

As the group accurately notes, the US healthcare system has transformed itself into a digital industry at astonishing speed, largely during the past five years. Nonetheless, many healthcare organizations haven’t unlocked the value of these new tools, in part because their technical infrastructure is largely a collection of disparate systems which don’t work together well.

The paper, which is published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, offers several policy recommendations intended to help health IT better support value-based health, care and research. The paper argues that governments should implement specific policy to:

  • Enable patients to have better access to clinical data by standardizing data flow
  • Improve access to patient-generated data compiled by mHealth apps and related technologies
  • Engage patients in research by improving ways to alert clinicians and patients about research opportunities, while seeing to it that researchers manage consent effectively
  • Enable patient participation in and contribution to care delivery and health management by harmonizing standards for various classes of patient-generated data
  • Improve interoperability using APIs, which may demand that policymakers require adherence to chosen data standards
  • Develop and implement a documentation-simplification framework to fuel an overhaul of quality measurement, ensure availability of coded EHRs clinical data and support reimbursement requirements redesign
  • Develop and implement an app-vetting process emphasizing safety and effectiveness, to include creating a knowledgebase of trusted sources, possibly as part of clinical practice improvement under MIPS
  • Create a policy framework for research and innovation, to include policies to aid data access for research conducted by HIPAA-covered entities and increase needed data standardization
  • Foster an ecosystem connecting safe, effective and secure health applications

To meet these goals, AMIA issued a set of “Policy Action Items” which address immediate, near-term and future policy initiatives. They include:

  • Clarifying a patient’s HIPAA “right to access” to include a right to all data maintained by a covered entity’s designated record set;
  • Encourage continued adoption of 2015 Edition Certified Health IT, which will allow standards-based APIs published in the public domain to be composed of standard features which can continue to be deployed by providers; and
  • Make effective Common Rule revisions as finalized in the January 19, 2017 issue of the Federal Register

In looking at this material, I noted with interest AMIA’s thinking on the appropriate premises for current health IT policy. The group offered some worthwhile suggestions on how health IT leaders can leverage health data effectively, such as giving patients easy access to their mHealth data and engaging them in the research process.

Given that they overlap with suggestions I’ve seen elsewhere, we may be getting somewhere as an industry. In fact, it seems to me that we’re approaching industry consensus on some issues which, despite seeming relatively straightforward have been the subject of professional disputes.

As I see it, AMIA stands as good a chance as any other healthcare entity at getting these policies implemented. I look forward to seeing how much progress it makes in drawing attention to these issues.

HL7 Releases New FHIR Update

Posted on April 3, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

HL7 has announced the release of a new version of FHIR designed to link it with real-world concepts and players in healthcare, marking the third of five planned updates. It’s also issuing the first release of the US Core Implementation Guide.

FHIR release 3 was produced with the cooperation of hundreds of contributors, and the final product incorporates the input of more than 2,400 suggested changes, according to project director Grahame Grieve. The release is known as STU3 (Standard for Trial Use, release 3).

Key changes to the standard include additional support for clinical quality measures and clinical decision support, as well as broader functionality to cover key clinical workflows.

In addition, the new FHIR version includes incremental improvements and increased maturity of the RESTful API, further development of terminology services and new support for financial management. It also defined an RDF format, as well as how FHIR relates to linked data.

HL7 is already gearing up for the release of FHIR’s next version. It plans to publish the first draft of version 4 for comment in December 2017 and review comments on the draft. It will then have a ballot on the version, in April 2018, and publish the new standard by October 2018.

Among those contributing to the development of FHIR is the Argonaut project, which brings together major US EHR vendors to drive industry adoption of FHIR forward. Grieve calls the project a “particularly important” part of the FHIR community, though it’s hard to tell how far along its vendor members have come with the standard so far.

To date, few EHR vendors have offered concrete support for FHIR, but that’s changing gradually. For example, in early 2016 Cerner released an online sandbox for developers designed to help them interact with its platform. And earlier this month, Epic announced the launch of a new program, helping physician practices to build customized apps using FHIR.

In addition to the vendors, which include athenahealth, Cerner, Epic, MEDITECH and McKesson, several large providers are participating. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Intermountain Healthcare, the Mayo Clinic and Partners HealthCare System are on board, as well as the SMART team at the Boston Children’s Hospital Informatics Program.

Meanwhile, the progress of developing and improving FHIR will continue.  For release 4 of FHIR, the participants will focus on record-keeping and data exchange for the healthcare process. This will encompass clinical data such as allergies, problems and care plans; diagnostic data such observations, reports and imaging studies; medication functions such as order, dispense and administration; workflow features like task, appointment schedule and referral; and financial data such as claims, accounts and coverage.

Eventually, when release 5 of FHIR becomes available, developers should be able to help clinicians reason about the healthcare process, the organization says.

Healthcare CIOs Focus On Optimizing EMRs

Posted on March 30, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Few technical managers struggle with more competing priorities than healthcare CIOs. But according to a recent survey, they’re pretty clear what they have to accomplish over the next few years, and optimizing EMRs has leapt to the top of the to-do list.

The survey, which was conducted by consulting firm KPMG in collaboration with CHIME, found that 38 percent of CHIME members surveyed saw EMR optimization as their #1 priority for capital investment over the next three years.  To gather results, KPMG surveyed 122 CHIME members about their IT investment plans.

In addition to EMR optimization, top investment priorities identified by the respondents included accountable care/population health technology (21 percent), consumer/clinical and operational analytics (16 percent), virtual/telehealth technology enhancements (13 percent), revenue cycle systems/replacement (7 percent) and ERP systems/replacement (6 percent).

Meanwhile, respondents said that improving business and clinical processes was their biggest challenge, followed by improving operating efficiency and providing business intelligence and analytics.

It looks like at least some of the CIOs might have the money to invest, as well. Thirty-six percent said they expected to see an increase in their operating budget over the next two years, and 18 percent of respondents reported that they expect higher spending over the next 12 months. On the other hand, 63 percent of respondents said that spending was likely to be flat over the next 12 months and 44 percent over the next two years. So we have to assume that they’ll have a harder time meeting their goals.

When it came to infrastructure, about one-quarter of respondents said that their organizations were implementing or investing in cloud computing-related technology, including servers, storage and data centers, while 18 percent were spending on ERP solutions. In addition, 10 percent of respondents planned to implement cloud-based EMRs, 10 percent enterprise systems, and 8 percent disaster recovery.

The respondents cited data loss/privacy, poorly-optimized applications and integration with existing architecture as their biggest challenges and concerns when it came to leveraging the cloud.

What’s interesting about this data is that none of the respondents mentioned improved security as a priority for their organization, despite the many vulnerabilities healthcare organizations have faced in recent times.  Their responses are especially curious given that a survey published only a few months ago put security at the top of CIOs’ list of business goals for near future.

The study, which was sponsored by clinical communications vendor Spok, surveyed more than 100 CIOs who were CHIME members  — in other words, the same population the KPMG research tapped. The survey found that 81 percent of respondents named strengthening data security as their top business goal for the next 18 months.

Of course, people tend to respond to surveys in the manner prescribed by the questions, and the Spok questions were presumably worded differently than the KPMG questions. Nonetheless, it’s surprising to me that data security concerns didn’t emerge in the KPMG research. Bottom line, if CIOs aren’t thinking about security alongside their other priorities, it could be a problem.

EMR Information Management Tops List Of Patient Threats

Posted on March 23, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A patient safety organization has reached a conclusion which should be sobering for healthcare IT shops across the US. The ECRI Institute , a respected healthcare research organization, cited three critical health IT concerns in its list of the top 10 patient safety concerns for 2017.

ECRI has been gathering data on healthcare events and concerns since 2009, when it launched a patient safety organization. Since that time, ECRI and its partner PSOs have collected more than 1.5 million event reports, which form the basis for the list. (In other words, the list isn’t based on speculation or broad value judgments.)

In a move that won’t surprise you much, ECRI cited information management in EMRs as the top patient safety concern on its list.

To address this issue, the group suggests that healthcare organizations create cross-functional teams bringing varied perspectives to the table. This means integrating HIM professionals, IT experts and clinical engineers into patient safety, quality and risk management programs. ECRI also recommends that these organizations see that users understand EMRs, report and investigate concerns and leverage EMRs for patient safety programs.

Implementation and use of clinical decision support tools came in at third on the list, in part because the potential for patient harm is high if CDS workflows are flawed, the report says.

If healthcare organizations want to avoid these problems, they need to give a multidisciplinary team oversight of the CDS, train end users in its use and give them access to support, the safety group says. ECRI also recommends that organizations monitor the appropriateness of CDS alerts, evaluating the impact on workflow and reviewing staff responses.

Test result reporting and follow-up was ranked fourth in the list of safety issues, driven by the fact that the complexity of the process can lead to distraction and problems with follow-up.

The report recommends that healthcare organizations respond by analyzing their test reporting systems and monitor their effectiveness in triggering appropriate follow-ups. It also suggests implementing policies and procedures that make it clear who is accountable for acting on test results, encouraging two-way conversations between healthcare professionals and those involved in diagnostic testing and teaching patients how to address test information.

Patient identification issues occupied the sixth position on the list, with the discussion noting that about 9 percent of misidentification problems lead to patient injury.

Healthcare leaders should prioritize this issue, engaging clinical and nonclinical staffers in identifying barriers to safe identification processes, the ECRI report concludes. It notes that if a provider has redundant patient identification processes in place, this can increase the probability that identification problems will occur. Also, it recommends that organizations standardize technologies like electronic displays and patient identification bands, and that providers consider bar-code systems and other patient identification helps.

In addition to health IT problems, ECRI identified several clinical and process issues, including unrecognized patient deterioration, problems with managing antimicrobial drugs, opioid administration and monitoring in acute care, behavioral health issues in non-behavioral-health settings, management of new oral anticoagulants and inadequate organization systems or processes to improve safety and quality.

But clearly, resolving nagging health IT issues will be central to improving patient care. Let’s make this the year that we push past all of them!

Study Offers Snapshot Of Provider App Preferences

Posted on March 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A recent study backed by HIT industry researchers and an ONC-backed health tech project offers an interesting window into how healthcare organizations see freestanding health apps. The research, by KLAS and the SMART Health IT Project, suggests that providers are developing an increasingly clear of what apps they’d like to see and how they’d use them.

Readers of this blog won’t be surprised to hear that it’s still early in the game for healthcare app use. In fact, the study notes, about half of healthcare organizations don’t formally use apps at the point of care. Also, most existing apps offer basic EMR data access, rather than advanced use cases.

The apps offering EMR data access are typically provided by vendors, and only allow users to view such data (as opposed to documenting care), according to the study report. But providers want to roll out apps which allow inputting of clinical data, as this function would streamline clinicians’ ability to make an initial patient assessment, the report notes.

But there are other important app categories which have gained an audience, including diagnostic apps used to support patient assessment, medical reference apps and patient engagement apps.  Other popular app types include clinical decision support tools, documentation tools and secure messaging apps, according to researchers.

It’s worth noting, though, that there seems to be a gap between what providers are willing to use and what they are willing to buy or develop on their own. For example, the report notes that nearly all respondents would be willing to buy or build a patient engagement app, as well as clinical decision support tools and documentation apps. The patient engagement apps researchers had in would manage chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, both very important population health challenges.

Hospital leaders, meanwhile, expressed interest in using sophisticated patient portal apps which go beyond simply allowing patients to view their data. “What I would like a patient app to do for us is to keep patients informed all throughout their two- to four-hours ED stay,” one CMO told researchers. “For instance, the app could inform them that their CBC has come back okay and that their physician is waiting on the read. That way patients would stay updated.”

When it came to selecting apps, respondents placed a top priority on usability, followed by the app’s cost, clinical impact, capacity for integration, functionality, app credibility, peer recommendations and security. (This is interesting, given many providers seem to give usability short shrift when evaluating other health IT platforms, most notably EMRs.)

To determine whether an app will work, respondents placed the most faith in conducting a pilot or other trial. Other popular approaches included vendor demos and peer recommendations. Few favored vendor websites or videos as a means of learning about apps, and even fewer placed working with app endorsement organizations or discovering them at conferences.

But providers still have a few persistent worries about third-party apps, including privacy and security, app credibility, the level of ongoing maintenance needed, the extent of integration and data aggregation required to support apps and issues regarding data ownership. Given that worrisome privacy and security concerns are probably justified, it seems likely that they’ll be a significant drag on app adoption going forward.

An Intelligent Interface for Patient Diagnosis by HealthTap

Posted on January 9, 2017 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

HealthTap, an organization that’s hard to categorize, really should appear in more studies of modern health care. Analysts are agog over the size of the Veterans Administration’s clientele, and over a couple other major institutions such as Kaiser Permanente–but who is looking at the 104,000 physicians and the hundreds of millions of patients from 174 countries in HealthTap’s database?

HealthTap allows patients to connect with doctors online, and additionally hosts an enormous repository of doctors’ answers to health questions. In addition to its sheer size and its unique combination of services, HealthTap is ahead of most other health care institutions in its use of data.

I talked with founder and CEO Ron Gutman about a new service, Dr. AI, that triages the patient and guides her toward a treatment plan: online resources for small problems, doctors for major problems, and even a recommendation to head off to the emergency room when that is warranted. The service builds on the patient/doctor interactions HealthTap has offered over its six years of operation, but is fully automated.

Somewhat reminiscent of IBM’s Watson, Dr. AI evaluates the patient’s symptoms and searches a database for possible diagnoses. But the Dr. AI service differs from Watson in several key aspects:

  • Whereas Watson searches a huge collection of clinical research journals, HealthTap searches its own repository of doctor/patient interactions and advice given by its participating doctors. Thus, Dr. AI is more in line with modern “big data” analytics, such as PatientsLikeMe does.

  • More importantly, HealthTap potentially knows more about the patient than Watson does, because the patient can build up a history with HealthTap.

  • And most important, Dr. AI is interactive. Instead of doing a one-time search, it employs artificial intelligence techniques to generate questions. For instance, it may ask, “Did you take an airplane flight recently?” Each question arises from the totality of what HealthTap knows about the patient and the patterns found in HealthTap’s data.

The following video shows Dr. AI in action:

A well-stocked larder of artificial intelligence techniques feed Dr. AI’s interactive triage service: machine learning, natural language processing (because the doctor advice is stored in plain text), Bayesian learning, and pattern recognition. These allow a dialog tailored to each patient that is, to my knowledge, unique in the health care field.

HealthTap continues to grow as a platform for remote diagnosis and treatment. In a world with too few clinicians, it may become standard for people outside the traditional health care system.