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Karen DeSalvo and Jacob Reider Leave ONC

Posted on October 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s been a tumultuous few months for ONC and it’s just gotten even more tumultuous. We previously reported about the departures of Doug Fridsma MD, ONC’s Chief Science Officer, Joy Pritts, the first Chief Privacy Officer at ONC, and Lygeia Ricciardi, Director of the Office of Consumer eHealth, and Judy Murphy, Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) from ONC. Yesterday, the news dropped that Karen DeSalvo, ONC’s National Coordinator, and Jacob Reider, ONC’s Deputy National Coordinator, are both leaving ONC as well.

Karen DeSalvo has been tapped by HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell to replace Wanda K. Jones as assistant secretary of health which oversees the surgeon general’s office and will be working on Ebola and other pressing health issues. I think DeSalvo’s letter to staff describes it well:

As you know, I have deep roots and a belief in public health and its critical value in assuring the health of everyone, not only in crisis, but every day, and I am honored to be asked to step in to serve.

DeSalvo’s always been a major public health advocate and that’s where her passion lies. Her passion isn’t healthcare technology. So, this change isn’t surprising. Although, it is a little surprising that it comes only 10 months into her time at ONC.

The obvious choice as Acting National Coordinator would have been Jacob Reider who was previously Acting National Coordinator when Farzad Mostashari left. However, Reider also announced his decision to leave ONC:

In light of the events that led to Karen’s announcement today–it’s appropriate now to be clear about my plans, as well. With Jon White and Andy Gettinger on board, and a search for a new Deputy National Coordinator well underway, I am pleased that much of this has now fallen into place–with only a few loose ends yet to be completed. I’ll remain at ONC until late November, working closely with Lisa as she assumes her role as Acting National Coordinator.

As Reider mentions, Lisa Lewis who is currently ONC’s COO will be serving as Acting National Coordinator at ONC.

What’s All This Mean?
There’s a lot of speculation as to why all of these departures are happening at ONC. Many people believe that ONC is a sinking ship and people are doing everything they can to get off the ship before it sinks completely. Others have suggested that these people see an opportunity to make a lot more money working for a company. The government certainly doesn’t pay market wages for the skills these people have. Plus, their connections and experience at ONC give them some unique qualifications that many companies are willing to pay to get. Some have suggested that the meaningful use work is mostly done and so these people want to move on to something new.

My guess is that it’s a mix of all of these things. It’s always hard to make broad generalizations about topics like this. For example, I already alluded to the fact that I think Karen DeSalvo saw an opportunity to move to a position that was more in line with her passions. Hard to fault someone for making that move. We’d all do the same.

What is really unclear is the future of ONC. They still have a few years of meaningful use which they’ll have to administer including the EHR penalties which could carry meaningful use forward for even longer than just a few years. I expect ONC will still have money to work on things like interoperability. We’ll see if ONC can put together the patient safety initiative they started or if that will get shut down because it’s outside their jurisdiction.

Beyond those things, what’s the future of ONC?

Meaningful Use Hardship Exceptions Reopened

Posted on October 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

CMS has announced its intent to reopen the Meaningful Use Hardship Exceptions filing period and set the new deadline for MU hardship exceptions to November 30, 2014. With the new hardship exception extension, providers can now choose from a number of reasons why they were unable to attest in time. Here’s the details from the CMS announcement:

This reopened hardship exception application submission period is for eligible professionals and eligible hospitals that:
* Have been unable to fully implement 2014 Edition CEHRT due to delays in 2014 Edition
CEHRT availability; AND
* Eligible professionals who were unable to attest by October 1, 2014 and eligible hospitals that were unable to attest by July 1, 2014 using the flexibility options provided in the CMS 2014 CEHRT Flexibility Rule.

These are the only circumstances that will be considered for this reopened hardship exception
application submission period.

This is a big move since the meaningful use hardship exceptions deadline for hospitals was April 1, 2014 and July 1, 2014 for eligible professionals. I imagine there are many organizations that will benefit from this extension. Although, there are probably quite a few organizations that wish they’d known about this exception before now or that think the exceptions are too narrow (ie. they can’t benefit from them).

What are your thoughts on this extension?

What If Meaningful Use Were Created by Doctors?

Posted on September 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s safe to say that meaningful use is growing through its challenges right now. My post yesterday about killing meaningful use and the new Flex-IT Act should be illustration enough. While it’s easy to play Monday Morning Quarterback on meaningful use, I think it’s also valuable to consider what meaningful use could have been and then use that to consider how we can still get there from where we are today.

Many of you might have read my post on The Purpose of the EHR Incentive Program Accordign to CMS. CMS clearly stats that the purpose of the EHR incentive money and meaningful use is to move providers towards advanced use of health IT to:

  • Support Reductions in Cost
  • Increase Access
  • Improve Outcomes for Patients

This has very clearly been CMS’ goal and it’s reflected in what we now know today as meaningful use. Let’s think about those from a physician perspective.

Support Reductions in Cost – So, you’re going to pay me less for doing the same work?

Increase Access – So, you’re going to send me patients who can’t pay their bill? Or does this mean I have to do more work making my records accessible?

Improve Outcomes for Patients – Every doctor can support this. However, many are skeptical (with good reason) that the various elements of meaningful use really do improve outcomes for patients.

If I were to step back and think what a doctor might consider meaningful use of an EHR system, this might be what they’d list (in no particular order):

  • More Efficient
  • Improved Care
  • Increased Revenue

More Efficient – Will the technology help me see patients more efficiently? Will it allow me to spend more time with the patient?

Improved Care – Will the technology help me be a better doctor? Will the technology help me make better use of my time with the patient?

Increased Revenue – Will the technology help me get paid more? Will the technology lower the cost of my malpractice insurance and reduce that risk? Will the technology create new revenue streams beyond just churning patient visits?

I’m sure there are other things that could be listed as well, but I think the list is directionally accurate. When you look at these two lists, there’s very clearly a major disconnect between what end users want and what meaningful use requires. With a lot of the EHR incentive money already paid out, this divide has become a major issue.

Killing Meaningful Use and Proposals to Change It

Posted on September 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Isn’t it nice that National Health IT Week brings people together to complain about meaningful use? Ok, that’s only partially in jest. Marc Probst, CIO of Intermountain and a member of the original meaningful use/EHR Certification committee (I lost track of the formal name), is making a strong statement as quoted by Don Fluckinger above.

Marc Probst is right that the majority of healthcare would be really happy to put a knife in meaningful use and move on from it. That’s kind of what I proposed when I suggested blowing up meaningful use. Not to mention my comments that meaningful use is on shaky ground. Comments from people like Marc Probst are proof of this fact.

In a related move, CHIME, AMDIS and 15 other healthcare organizations sent a letter to the HHS Secretary calling for immediate action to amend the 2015 meaningful use reporting period. These organizations believed that the final rule on meaningful use flexibility would change the reporting period, but it did not. It seems like they’re coming out guns blazing.

In even bigger news (albeit probably related), Congresswoman Renee Ellmers (R-NC) and Congressman Jim Matheson (D-UT) just introduced the Flexibility in Health IT Reporting (Flex-IT) act. This act would “allow providers to report their Health IT upgrades in 2015 through a 90-day reporting period as opposed to a full year.” I have yet to see any prediction on whether this act has enough support in Congress to get passed, but we could once again see congress act when CMS chose a different course of action like they did with ICD-10.

This story is definitely evolving and the pressure to change the reporting period to 90 days is on. My own personal prediction is that CMS will have to make the change. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Happy National Health IT Week!

EHR Certification Flexibility Final Rule Commentary and Analysis

Posted on September 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The news came out late on Friday that the EHR Certification flexibility was published as a final rule. I covered my initial take on the EHR Certification Flexibility on Hospital EMR and EHR. I’ve now had a chance to dig through the delicious 90 pages of government rule making and comments that make up the final rule. For those following along at home, you can skip to page 10 of the document to start the fun read. Although, I’ll also direct you to specific sections that might be of interest to you below.

In this post, I’ll just cover the EHR certification flexibility. You can see the meaningful use extension and delay timelines here. Here’s the important chart when talking about the EHR Certification flexibility (CMS Calls it CEHRT):
2014 EHR Certification Flexibility - CEHRT

The EHR Certification flexibility has a number of major talking points:

  • What Does “unable to fully implement” and “2014 Edition CEHRT availability delays” mean?
  • Fairness of EHR Certification Flexibility
  • 90 Day Reporting Period in 2015 Instead of 365 Days
  • Future Audits

What Does “unable to fully implement” and “2014 Edition CEHRT availability delays” mean?
On page 62 of the rule is the best description of the rule’s intent. It says that if you want to take advantage of this EHR flexibility, then they (Eligible providers or hospitals) “must attest that they are unable to fully implement 2014 Edition CEHRT because of issues related to 2014 Edition CEHRT availability delays when they attest to the meaningful use objectives and measures.” This basically covers the asterisk in the chart above.

This piece of the rule was so unclear that CMS in the final rule used 12 pages (pg. 36-48) to describe when this rule would apply and when it would not apply. CMS tried to make this apply as broadly as possible, but I think they also wanted to encourage as many organizations as possible to not use the exception.

My short summary of these 12 pages is: If you have the 2014 Certified EHR software and can attest to meaningful use stage 2, then you better go ahead and do it. Trying to find a loophole that allows you to avoid meaningful use stage 2 and just do MU stage 1 puts you at risk during a future meaningful use audit.

Of course, if you’re EHR vendor hasn’t provided you the proper software/updates/training, etc that you require to attest to meaningful use stage 2, then this rule will apply. CMS’ intent seems pretty clear. If you can attest to meaningful use stage 2, then you should. However, if your EHR vendor prevents you from being able to attest, then they don’t want to hold the providers accountable for the EHR vendors failure. Although, CMS notes multiple times in the final rule that they don’t want to point blame at the EHR vendors since it could have been other outside issues (ie. final rule was late, ONC-ACB’s were backlogged, etc) that caused the EHR vendors to not be ready.

I wonder if one of the unintended side effects of this rule will be EHR vendors taking their sweet time releasing and rolling out their 2014 Certified EHR product and updates. It’s too late for this in the hospital setting since hospitals have to do a full year of MU 2 on a 2014 Certified EHR starting October 1, 2014. However, the same might not be true on the ambulatory side where they have until the end of the year to start on meaningful use stage 2.

I’ll be interested to see how many organizations are able to take advantage of this delay. Had this rule been finalized in early 2014, it would be a very different story. However, at this late date, I’m not sure that many providers or hospitals will be able to change course.

I mostly feel bad for those organizations that rushed their EHR implementations onto barely-beta-tested 2014 Certified EHR software and will now have no choice but to go forward with meaningful use stage 2. This change in rule makes many of these organizations wish they’d slowed their implementation to make sure they’d done it right and they’d have also only been required to do MU stage 1.

Fairness of EHR Certification Flexibility
The last paragraph above highlights part of the reason why many providers feel that this EHR certification flexibility is unfair. While it’s not a direct penalty on organizations that were on top of things, the change rewards those organizations that didn’t take the risks, push their EHR vendors, and push their implementation timelines to meet the MU stage 2 requirements. The reward an organization gets for going after MU stage 2 is that they have to do a lot more work (Yes, MU2 is A LOT more work) while their procrastinating competitors get to do the much simpler MU1.

This was such an important complaint that CMS addressed these comments in two different places in the final rule (pg. 21-22 and pg. 48-50). CMS tries to argue that in their research they didn’t see providers that were deliberately trying to delay MU stage 2, but found that providers wanted to do MU stage 2, but their EHR vendors weren’t ready. I’d suggest that CMS may want to dig a little deeper.

However, let’s set providers aside for now and assume that they all want to do MU stage 2, but their EHR vendors just aren’t ready for it. This EHR certification flexibility still lets EHR vendors who procrastinated their 2014 EHR certification off the hook. In fact, it rewards them and their users for not performing well. Once again, CMS doesn’t want to point the finger at EHR vendors, but will blame themselves for not finalizing the rule fast enough and ONC-ACB’s for having a backlog. However, if you’re an EHR vendor who’s been 2014 Certified for a while now, no doubt this rule makes you angry since it rewards your competitors in a big way (intended or otherwise).

Certainly there are a lot of reasons why an EHR vendor isn’t yet ready to be 2014 Certified. However, most of them have little to do with the rule making process and the EHR certification backlog. Some freely admit it, and others hide behind excuses. I think CMS realized this EHR Certification flexibility would benefit these EHR vendors, but they didn’t want to punish the providers who use these EHR software.

I still think the simple solution here was to extend this same flexibility to all providers and all EHR vendors. However, in the final rule CMS argues that doing so would reduced the amount of meaningful use stage 2 data that they’d have available to make the adjustments needed to meaningful use stage 3. I understand how a provider doing MU stage 2 this year might feel like the government’s guinea pig. We need you to do MU stage 2 so we can figure out how to make it right in MU stage 3. CMS also argues that they need more people on meaningful use stage 2 in order to push their agenda and the intent of the HITECH act forward. What doesn’t seem aligned to me is the goals of meaningful use and providers’ goals. I think that’s why we see such a disconnect.

90 Day Reporting Period in 2015 Instead of 365 Days
This seems to be one of the most heated discussion points with the final rule. CHIME President and CEO, Russell P. Branzell, even suggested that “Now, the very future of Meaningful Use is in question.”

CMS’ comments about this (pg. 34-36) basically say that a change to the EHR reporting periods was not part of this proposed rule. Then, they offered this reason for why they’re not considering changes to the reporting periods:

We are not considering changes to the EHR reporting periods for 2015 or subsequent years in this final rule for the same reasons we are not considering changing the edition of CEHRT required for 2015 or subsequent years. Changes to the EHR reporting period would put the forward progress of the program at risk, and cause further delay in implementing effective health IT infrastructure. In addition, further changes to the reporting period would create further misalignment with the CMS quality reporting programs like PQRS and IQR, which would increase the reporting burden on providers and negatively impact quality reporting data integrity.

What this comment doesn’t seem to consider is what will happen if almost no organizations choose to attest to meaningful use because of the 365 day reporting period. Talk about killing the “forward progress” of the program. From a financial perspective, maybe that’s great for the MU program. CMS will pay out less incentive money and they’ll make back a bunch more money in the eventual penalties. However, it seems counter to the goal of increasing participation in the program. Personally, I’m not sure that the end of organization’s participation in meaningful use would be such a bad thing for healthcare. It would lead back to a more rationale EHR marketplace.

Future Audits
On page 55-56, the final rule addresses the concerns over audits. We can be sure that some organizations will be audited on whether they were “unable to fully implement 2014 Edition CEHRT because of issues related to 2014 Edition CEHRT availability delays.” Sadly, the final rule doesn’t give any details on what documentation you should keep to illustrate that you meet these requirements for which you will have to attest. The final rule just says that they’ll provide guidance to the auditors on this final rule and that audit determinations are finalized on a case by case basis that will cover the varied circumstances that will exist.

This wouldn’t give me much comfort if I was going through an audit. Not to mention comfort that the auditors wouldn’t interpret something differently. I’ll defer other audit advice to my auditor friends, since I’m not an audit expert. However, in this case you likely know how far you’re stretching the rule or not. That will likely determine how comfortable you’ll be if an audit comes your way. Now you can see why my advice is still, “If you have the 2014 Certified EHR software and can attest to meaningful use stage 2, then you better go ahead and do it.

Conclusion
I really see the meaningful use program on extremely shaky ground. I don’t think this final rule does much to relieve any of that pressure. In fact, in some ways it will solidify people’s bad feelings towards the program. We’ll see for sure how this plays out once we see the final numbers on how many organizations attest to meaningful use stage 2. I don’t think those numbers are going to be pretty and 2015 could even be worse.

Note: For those following along at home (or work), here’s the final rule that I reference above.

Practical Application of Watson with EHR

Posted on July 24, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Ever since Watson made its debut on Jeopardy, I haven’t been able to not check out what Watson was doing next. No doubt what Watson did on Jeopardy was impressive. However, it’s one thing to do what it did on Watson. It’s another thing to commercialize the Watson into something useful.

I’d long been hearing that Watson was going to be great for healthcare IT and that healthcare would really benefit from the technology. However, everything I saw felt very conceptual as opposed to practical and implemented. So, I was really interested in talking with Modernizing Medicine about their EHR integration with Watson.

You can find my interview with Daniel Cane and Dr. Michael Sherling, Founders of Modernizing Medicine, talking about Watson and some of the other cool ways they’re trying to help doctors make use of the data in an EHR in the video below. Plus, we even talk ICD-10 and MU 2 delay as well.

Note: Modernizing Medicine is a Healthcare Scene advertiser.

EHR Vendors Need to Expand Their Definition of Customer Service

Posted on July 21, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Living in Las Vegas I likely have a skewed idea of what customer service means. In the tech world, we have Zappos headquarters in downtown Las Vegas. Most of you are likely familiar with Zappos unique approach to customer service. They really have taken customer service to the next level and created an entire company culture around the customer service they provide. The same could be said for the experience that the various casinos on the strip offer their customers. They do a really amazing job at most casinos providing an amazing customer service experience.

With this background, I find it really smart of Kareo to open an office in Las Vegas. Although, that’s not really the point of this post. Instead, I want to focus on the idea that most EHR vendors need expand their idea of customer service.

As I look at the world of EHR customer service I see so many organization lacking. Certainly we see examples of terrible EHR customer service that include calling into a call center in another country where the person doesn’t speak English and has no power to actually solve a user’s problems (Disclaimer: I don’t have a problem with call centers in other countries if they are well trained and can actually solve problems). Of course, the same thing can apply to a call center in the US who can’t solve the users’ actual problems. Both are terrible customer service and a problem in the industry. However, there’s a far more painful problem that I don’t think most EHR vendors consider a part of their customer service plan and 99% of EHR vendors have done terrible at this.

Adding new features and accommodating an EHR user’s feature request is just as much a part of the EHR customer service experience as the person who answers the phone. I can assure you that every EHR vendor out there would get rated an F the past few years when it comes to this form of EHR customer service. Why do I know this? I know this because every EHR vendor has been focused on meaningful use that they haven’t had the time to add any meaningful EHR user feature requests and features outside of meaningful use.

This isn’t EHR vendors’ fault. The end users have required it and EHR vendors have had to spend the time doing it. However, EHR customer service has suffered as a consequence. Don’t believe me. Look through all the EHR press releases that have been released over the past couple years. Find me the plethora of press releases that talk about the innovations that EHR vendors have created for their end users that aren’t related to meaningful use. I get the press releases and they’re MIA.

That’s not to say that EHR vendors have done nothing for end users. They’ve made some incremental progress on a few things, but meaningful use has zapped their development time. Stage 2 was even worse. I look forward to the new day where EHR vendors can focus on great customer service and EHR features and not just MU.

EHR Incentive Market Share Charts Worth A Thousand Words

Posted on July 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One thing I really love about the government lately is their goal to be as transparent as possible. Certainly they still have a ways to go, but I think healthcare has done some significant things when it comes to transparency into the government health programs. A great example of this is the Health IT Dashboard which has all of the data for the various health IT programs.

I don’t want to steal Carl Bergman’s thunder, because he’s already posted some really interesting Hospital EHR market share data and his previous EHR market share data. Plus, he’s planning to dive into the meaningful use market share data next. I love the approach of multiple sources when it comes to evaluating EHR market share and so I look forward to his analysis of EHR incentive market share against the EHR adoption market share from Definitive Healthcare and SK&A.

Until then, I thought I’d give you a taste of the EHR vendor participation in the EHR incentive program. This data comes from the ONC dashboards listed above and are put into some really nice snapshots of the data by ONC.

First up is the data for EHR vendor attestations by eligible professionals (ie. ambulatory doctors):
EHR Incentive Market Share - Eligible Professionals

And the EHR vendor attestations by hospitals:
EHR Incentive Market Share - Hospitals

It’s worth noting that the above data is just the EHR incentive money data. No doubt the actual EHR adoption data would have a few differences and include some companies in specialties that don’t qualify for EHR incentive money. Not to mention specialty specific EHR vendors who likely don’t make the chart even if they dominate their specialty. These charts do serve as an interesting proxy for EHR market share that’s worthy of discussion even if it doesn’t paint the full picture. Plus, even more important will be to watch the change in these numbers over time.

With that disclaimer, we could analyze this data a lot of ways. I’ll just offer a few interesting insights I noticed. First, 711 vendors have been used in the ambulatory EHR incentive program. That’s a lot of vendors. Only 78 of those 711 supply secondary EHRs as opposed to the primary EHR. 452 EHR vendors supply a primary EHR to less than 100 eligible professionals. 200 EHR vendors supply a primary EHR to fewer than 10 eligible professionals. These observations and a comparison of the ambulatory versus hospital EHR incentive charts’ “Other Vendors” shows how fragmented the ambulatory EHR market share is right now.

I was also intrigued that Mitochon Systems, Inc. was on the list even though they shut down their Free EHR software in May 2013. They had white labeled their EHR software to a number of other companies and so it will be interesting to see how that number evolves. I assume they sold the software to those companies, but I hadn’t heard an update.

On the hospital side of things, MEDITECH certainly doesn’t get the credit they deserve for the size of their install base. The same goes for CPSI, MEDHOST and Healthland. I think their problem is that people only want to read about the Mayo, Cleveland Clinic, and Kaiser’s of the world and so the articles about Billings Montana Hospital (I made that hospital up) rarely happen. I should find more ways to solve that since the small hospital market is huge.

I do wish that there was a way to divide the ambulatory chart into hospital owned ambulatory practices and independent ambulatory practices. That would paint an even clearer picture of that market.

What do you think of these charts? What can we learn from them?

Your EHR Vendor Isn’t Certified: Remove Barriers and Conquer Meaningful Use Stage 2

Posted on July 2, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I wrote previously about the “Triple Aim” of healthcare and even questioned if doctors really cared about the triple aim. For those not familiar with the triple aim, it includes: improving the health of our country, enabling less expensive care, and increasing patient engagement with their healthcare. All of these are noble goals and worthy of effort. Plus, even if providers aren’t moved by this goal, that doesn’t mean that much of the legislation and regulation that hits healthcare won’t be guided by this triple aim.

I was reading through this Allscripts whitepaper titled “Your EHR Vendor Isn’t Certified: Remove Barriers and Conquer Meaningful Use Stage 2” when I thought about how the triple aim is going to impact an organization’s decisions moving forward whether they like it or not.

The whitepaper underscores the shift towards more patient engagement, smart EHR tools, and population health. I think that generally summarizes meaningful use and is why it’s going to be really important that everyone in healthcare is involved in it.

Even if you don’t want to participate in the meaningful use program specifically, the overall trends that meaningful use represent are likely going to be with us for the foreseeable future. No doubt the government’s focus will continue this direction and I think payers are heading the same direction as well. They probably won’t adopt meaningful use entirely, but elements from it and other programs will likely be adopted by payers.

Check out the full whitepaper for more details on these trends and making sure your EHR is ready for them.

Patient Engagement vs. Patient Education: What’s the Difference?

Posted on June 3, 2014 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Jamie Verkamp, Chief Speaking Officer at (e)Merge.
Jamie Verkamp
Healthcare organizations often see attesting to the Measures included in Meaningful Use Stage 2 as a burdensome checklist which results in a massive resource drain in exchange for inadequate financial compensation. MU Stage 2 Measure 7 is one such oft-maligned requirement for attestation. This Measure requires that online access to records is provided to 50% of patients and that 5% of patients execute the viewing, download, or transmission of their online health information.  Organizations should not see Measures regarding patient engagement as intimidating or inconvenient. Instead, these Measures seeking to improve patient engagement should be seen as an opportunity to create more loyal, involved, and empowered patients.  The importance of engaging our patients in their own health shows itself in current statistics relating to personal health.  According to a study by TeleVox, roughly 83% of Americans don’t follow treatment plans as prescribed by their physicians.  Adding to that, 42% of Americans feel they would be more likely to follow their care plan if they received some form of motivation to participate.  By giving patients a channel to monitor and participate in their own health, organizations can develop a more educated population capable of producing greater outcomes.

Understanding the reasoning behind the Measures driving patient engagement is the first step; now, we must educate our patient population on the value of logging in and connecting with their information. While the frequency of patients physically visiting their provider’s office is somewhat inconsistent, this is often the most successful way to encourage electronic patient access. Patient facing staff members should be well educated on electronic patient access and be prepared to answer questions as they arise. Physically walking patients through the engagement process of maneuvering their electronic access, or providing video tutorials with simple instructions in the office lobby can increase patient engagement substantially. Consider setting up a station in the waiting room to allow patients to sign up for the service, thus solving the issue of forgotten motivation.

However, organizations must seek to include in their engagement plan the younger and healthier population who may not enter the physical office space outside of unforeseen emergency visits or more often than their annual checkup requires. Looking online to relate with these patients can be beneficial, as this has been found to be where this demographic spends the majority of their time and communication engaging with brands and services.  Providing information and education on an organization’s website, Facebook, Twitter, or even YouTube page through video promotion can assist in sparking an interest with this patient population.  Many times, those likely to engage in a patient engagement offering remain unaware of its availability due to a lack of communication from the healthcare organization.  From the practice standpoint, we must understand our work is not done once the portal is merely completed; rather this is when the real challenge presents itself.

In today’s society, consumers are bombarded with promotional emails and routinely asked for their contact information so further communication can be established.  With this in mind, consumers are more cautious as to what and how much information they provide to companies.  Unfortunately, for the healthcare industry, this includes a cautious nature toward information shared with healthcare organizations.   With this barrier in place, administrators must actively engage with their patients to educate them on the benefits of becoming involved in electronically managing their care.  Before consumers choose to willingly hand over their personal contact information, they will likely need to understand the reasons for doing so and what advantages they will receive.

Convenience has become one of the most desired aspects of communication and buying behaviors in consumers today.  As a society, we have adopted a “need it now” expectation.  With the ease portable technology has brought to our information search, patients and consumers count on service when they desire it.   This is especially true when it comes to customer service; consumers are becoming less patient and beginning to expect service when they desire.  In a recent study, it was found businesses offering a “Live Chat” option online saw a 15% increase in conversions. Explaining to patients the ease of communication with physicians and key staff members through the portal can be a helpful start in creating buy in.  Communication via the portal includes direct messaging, appointment reminders, and more. Informing patients of potential time saving factors in appointments down the road and quicker access to lab results can also establish and pique interest.  In many instances, finding the optimal moment to address the patient portal can create successful outcomes.  Patients burdened by numerous prescription refill requirements or those frustrated with waiting in line to pay a bill can be directed back to the convenience of a patient portal to handle all of these items at their own computer at home.

As a whole, those looking to meet this Stage 2 requirement must focus their attention on creating personalized communication with patients.  Standardized information will not entice patients and may easily be looked over.  Begin to examine which staff members may be the best fit for providing patient education and focus on educating patients on what they will get out of participating, not just simply meeting your Measure 7 requirements.   Potential touch points can be found within your signage, billing communications, appointment reminders and especially on your practice website and social sites.

According to HealthIT.gov, Meaningful Use Stage 3 will continue with the goal of driving patient engagement and improving outcomes.  This will include, “patient access to self-management tools”. The options for healthcare organizations are clear:

1. An organization can meet the bare minimum for the Stage 2 requirements using a patchwork of initiatives which produce minimally satisfying results while have no significant effect on the patient experience. Then repeat the entire process for the applicable Measures in Stage 3.

2. An organization can have a well-articulated and executable plan. In doing so, the practice, hospital or healthcare organization can commit to utilizing technology for the optimization of patient care, get a full return on investment from the Patient Portal, and simultaneously grow their business through the competitive advantage of a successful online presence. Initiating this push now will further develop readiness for Stage 3 as the implementation date approaches and with productive workflows in place, administrators can free themselves to focus on other Measures for attestation.

So which option will your organization choose? It’s not going to be easy, but change seldom is. Every industry experiences social and digital evolution, now it is healthcare’s turn.

About Jamie Verkamp
This article is a result of a partnership between (e)Merge, a medical growth consulting firm and DataFile Technologies, an outsourced medical records management and compliance company. Jamie Verkamp leads (e)Merge as Managing Partner and Chief Speaking Officer, she works shoulder to shoulder with medical professionals the healthcare industry to improve the patient experience and see measurable growth in clients‘ customer service efforts, referral volumes and bottom lines. DataFile Technologies is led by Janine Akers, CEO. DataFile’s passion for compliance allows them to be thought leaders in HIPAA interpretation while executing innovative medical records workflow solutions on behalf of their clients. Our companies produce white papers, speaking engagements, and videos to keep health professionals up to date on the latest industry topics.