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EHR is the Fossil Fuel of Healthcare

Posted on December 13, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare has become completely dependent on EHR. There’s no getting around it.

In every organization that has an EHR, it’s the center of pretty much every healthcare providers work day. We’ve seen all the studies that talk about how much time doctors spend on the EHR. The problem I have with those studies is they never compare how much time doctors spent doing paper charts to the time they’re now spending on the EHR. However, these studies do also illustrate how integral the EHR has become in healthcare.

Expanding beyond the time spent on an EHR, could a hospital or medical practice get paid without an EHR today? I guess some medical practices still do, but if the EHR were to shut down healthcare organizations would largely stop being able to bill for the services they offer. Healthcare billing is completely dependent on the EHR.

Looking at this in a more positive light, EHR data is also the fuel of so many other exciting healthcare IT initiatives. Clinical decision support is all largely built into the EHR and on the back of EHR data. Much of the personalized medicine that is happening (except genomic medicine) is happening with EHR data. The same goes for population health analysis and all the healthcare analytics that are looking at ways to improve care and lower costs.

Is there any department in healthcare that doesn’t have a dependency on the EHR? I guess the cleaning staff don’t. However, that illustrates how dependent we are on EHR.

We could, of course, talk about whether this is a good or a bad thing for healthcare. I’m torn on this myself. We are completely dependent on the EHR, but it’s also a foundation for much of the innovation that is and will happen in healthcare. Plus, is dependency a problem when the thing you’re depending on is very reliable?

What could help this situation? The only real solution I can see is to create an environment where a healthcare organization could leave their EHR and go to another one if needed. This reduces the dependency and forces the EHR software provider to have to continually innovate so that you don’t want to leave to another vendor.

Unfortunately, we don’t have this in healthcare. In the hospital EHR world, I’m not sure we’ll ever get there. Once you spend $100+ million on an EHR, it’s pretty hard to justify ripping it out and putting in a new one.

What do you think about our dependency on EHR? Is it a good thing? Is it a bad thing? What can and should we do to make this situation better?

What’s Keeping HealthIT From Soaring to the Cloud? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on December 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/15 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave) on the topic of “What’s Keeping HealthIT From Soaring to the Cloud?.”

Premise and Private HealthIT architectures have ruled in healthcare and were unfortunately reinforced by the timing of ACA/HITECH. Infrastructure-as-a-Service, Platform-as-a-Service and other cloud-native approaches are revolutionizing all industries, and while for some somewhat valid reasons Healthcare has been slow to adopt the Cloud it’s now firmly ripe for transformation. So what are the forces keeping HealthIT from soaring to the Cloud? And how will cloud adoption in other industries and also within certain sectors of the healthcare landscape such as pharma and insurance give HealthIT the lift it needs to get off The Ground and into The Cloud?

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: How do premise and cloud-native HealthIT strategies differ? #HITsm

T2: What’s gained by moving HealthIT from premise-based designs to hosted, virtual and private cloud architectures? #HITsm

T3: What cyber-security concerns are keeping Cloud-native HealthIT from soaring? And how can these concerns be overcome? #HITsm

T4: Once HealthIT is truly in the Cloud what can HealthIT professionals see and do better than they can on ‘The Ground’? #HITsm

T5: What are the pros/cons of Cloud ‘dev-ops’ model and Ground ‘upgrade/migration’ IT deployment models? #HITsm

Bonus: How quickly will HealthIT professionals have to adopt pervasive Cloud-native HealthIT architectures? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

EHR, Patient Portals and OpenNotes: Making OpenNotes Work Well – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on December 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/8 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from (@MyOpenNotes) on the topic of “EHR, Patient Portals and OpenNotes: Making OpenNotes Work Well.”

There are now nearly 100 health systems across the United States using secure patient portals to share visit notes with more than 20 million of their patients. And as the saying goes, if you’ve seen one OpenNotes implementation, you’ve seen one OpenNotes implementation.

No two health systems approach OpenNotes in the same way, and much of the variation stems from human resistance to change. Change is hard; whether it involves assuring and supporting clinicians in their move toward sharing notes or whether it’s surmounting technical challenges within the electronic health record.

We know the electronic health record is here to stay. We’re not going back to paper. And we know that when patients are offered online access to the medical information in their records, including access to notes, these patients continue to want that access and they share its benefits.

At their annual meeting in November 2017, the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) announced a formal collaboration with OpenNotes, stating, “The evidence-base is clear: providing patients access to their physician’s notes improves physician-patient communication and trust, patient safety, and perhaps even patient outcomes.”

So how do we bridge resistance to change? And as OpenNotes expands, how do we guide health systems to ensure the best possible patient experience?

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions. Homer Chin and Amy Fellows will be on hand to share key learnings from vendors and health IT teams that have been making OpenNotes work over the past few years.

Reference Materials:

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: What cultural barriers to OpenNotes adoption and use exist within the #healthcare IT profession vs. the clinical/medical community? #hitsm

T2: Given that OpenNotes is a movement and not a discrete software product, what are the technical challenges for implementing OpenNotes inside the patient portal? #hitsm

T3: If you’re currently implementing OpenNotes in your health system: What advice and/or cavetats can you share with colleagues? #hitsm

T4: If you haven’t implemented OpenNotes at your health system: What’s holding you back? What do you believe are the key challenges impeding implementation? #hitsm

T5: What customization strategies and/or tips do you have for helping patients navigate healthcare portals to find their #medical record notes? #hitsm

BONUS: What type of “OpenNotes-related” functionality should #EHR vendors be including in their product(s) to serve both clinicians AND patients? #hitsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/15 – What’s Keeing HealthIT from Soaring to the Cloud?
Hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave)

12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Healthcare Costs Video

Posted on December 1, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In all the crazy discussions that are happening about healthcare, it’s always frustrating to me that so few of them talk about healthcare costs. Politicians are talking a lot about healthcare insurance and coverage. Those in healthcare IT talk about meaningful use, MACRA, and over regulation. No doubt there are challenges associated with insurance coverage and with health IT regulation. However, none of them will move the needle on how much healthcare is costing this nation.

Sometimes it takes a little bit of humor to illustrate the point and that’s what this video from Adam Ruins Everything does with healthcare costs:

Not exactly a Fun Friday video like we usually do, but kind of. The saddest part of this video though is near the end when she asks what can be done to fix the problem and he says nothing. Rolling back healthcare costs is the real issue with healthcare today and there are a lot of entrenched interests that want nothing to do with it.

Machine Learning, Data Science, AI, Deep Learning, and Statistics – It’s All So Confusing

Posted on November 30, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It seems like these days every healthcare IT company out there is saying they’re doing machine learning, AI, deep learning, etc. So many companies are using these terms that they’ve started to lose meaning. The problem is that people are using these labels regardless of whether they really apply. Plus, we all have different definitions for these terms.

As I search to understand the differences myself, I found this great tweet from Ronald van Loon that looks at this world and tries to better define it:

In that tweet, Ronald also links to an article that looks at some of the differences. I liked this part he took from Quora:

  • AI (Artificial intelligence) is a subfield of computer science, that was created in the 1960s, and it was (is) concerned with solving tasks that are easy for humans, but hard for computers. In particular, a so-called Strong AI would be a system that can do anything a human can (perhaps without purely physical things). This is fairly generic, and includes all kinds of tasks, such as planning, moving around in the world, recognizing objects and sounds, speaking, translating, performing social or business transactions, creative work (making art or poetry), etc.
  • Machine learning is concerned with one aspect of this: given some AI problem that can be described in discrete terms (e.g. out of a particular set of actions, which one is the right one), and given a lot of information about the world, figure out what is the “correct” action, without having the programmer program it in. Typically some outside process is needed to judge whether the action was correct or not. In mathematical terms, it’s a function: you feed in some input, and you want it to to produce the right output, so the whole problem is simply to build a model of this mathematical function in some automatic way. To draw a distinction with AI, if I can write a very clever program that has human-like behavior, it can be AI, but unless its parameters are automatically learned from data, it’s not machine learning.
  • Deep learning is one kind of machine learning that’s very popular now. It involves a particular kind of mathematical model that can be thought of as a composition of simple blocks (function composition) of a certain type, and where some of these blocks can be adjusted to better predict the final outcome.

Is that clear for you now? Would you suggest different definitions? Where do you see people using these terms correctly and where do you see them using them incorrectly?

The Present Bias Problem with Medication Adherence

Posted on November 29, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I recently met Matthew Loper, the founder of a startup company called Wellth. The company is using behavioral economics to improve healthcare outcomes. They’re literally paying patients cold hard cash to take their medications. Plus, they have some pretty cool technology that uses just the smart phone to track medication adherence.

I must admit that I’ve seen hundreds of medication compliance companies over the years. While the approach each took was intriguing, all of them seemed to have some major obstacle to adoption. Some were too expensive. Some would never be adopted by patients. Some would never be adopted by healthcare providers, etc.

With this in mind, I was intrigued by a few slides that Matthew Loper from Wellth showed me about the medication adherence market and why the startups in that space have had limited success to date. First, he started off with this slide which illustrated the problem:

I’m not sure I agree totally with the concept of chronic patients not doing what’s rational. Instead, I think this slide illustrates that many chronic patients make short term versus long term decisions when it comes to their care. No doubt these short term decisions are very rational decisions in their minds. However, this data illustrates the Present Bias problem we have with medication adherence.

Matthew’s next slide illustrated really well how most current medication adherence solutions don’t solve the present bias problem:

I thought this slide categorized the medication adherence companies I’ve seen really well. It also explains why most of them aren’t very effective. Then, Matthew went on to suggest that paying patients to adhere to their care plan does overcome the Present Bias challenge:

You can talk with Wellth if you want to get more details on their work and the results of their pilots. It’s still early in their journey, but the concept seems to be producing some quality results. Plus, I love their efforts to use the cash incentive long enough to create a habit which then is sustained well after the payments stop. Pretty fascinating approach.

No doubt there are a lot more complexities associated with medication adherence. For example, this approach doesn’t take into account people who are motivated by money. However, it’s surprising how even rich people want to get a good deal. It will also take some time to see how much money is required to truly motivate someone to be compliant and if that cost is less that the amount of money saved. Not to mention, how do you even quantify how much money was saved when someone is more adherent to their care plan.

These challenges aren’t unique to Wellth, but to every healthcare IT solution working on this problem. It’s also why many of them have a hard time making the case for their solution. Turns out that purchasers of these solutions have a present bias problem as well. However, as more studies are done and as we get better at tracking a patient’s health, we’ll better be able to understand the long term benefits of things like medication adherence.

What do you think of Wellth’s approach to medication adherence? Should we be paying patients when they adhere to their care plan?

Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on November 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/1 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Gabe Charbonneau, MD (@gabrieldane) on the topic of “Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout.”

We live in confusing times. The marriage of technology and medicine is on the cusp of game changing breakthroughs. There is so much promise with deep learning/AI, big data, and the exponential growth in processing speed and storage, just to name a few. So, how is it that we are yet to get out of the dark ages when it comes to the EHR?

Physician burnout is a real problem. It seems like there is a new article put out weekly on the topic. Study after study points fingers of blame at the EHR. The pain from data entry and systems that don’t flow for clinicians is at an all time high. “Too many clicks”, and too many docs spending “pajama time” charting at home.

It has to get better.

While tech has been identified as a top contributor to the problem, it also has the potential to be a huge part of the solution.

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: Why is the EHR such a major driver of burnout in medicine? We’ve heard the common answers of “too many clicks” and increased clerical burden, but what else? Let’s dig deeper. #hitsm

T2: Who is happiest with their EHR and why? What can we learn from them? #hitsm

T3: What current technologies are the best for reducing EHR burnout? #hitsm

T4: What is the most exciting emerging technology for decreasing EHR burnout? #hitsm

T5: When should we expect to see the first wave of major improvements in EHR user experience for clinicians? What will it look like? #hitsm

Bonus: How can we take steps today to start moving the burnout needle in the right direction? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/8 – EHR, Patient Portals and OpenNotes: Making OpenNotes Work Well
Hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from @MyOpenNotes)

12/15 – What’s holding HealthIT from soaring to the Cloud?
Hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave)

12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Posted on November 23, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re taking the day off here at Healthcare Scene, but we wanted to wish all of our readers a Happy Thanksgiving. My day is filled with football, family, food, and fun which makes me very happy. I hope each of you get to celebrate Thanksgiving in a way that’s special to you.

At Healthcare Scene we feel extremely grateful to work in an industry where what we do really matters. We’re thankful for the thousands of readers who support the work we do and are working hard every day to improve the lives of patients. That’s a beautiful and powerful thing.

Happy Thanksgiving to all of you and thank you for all you do for patients!

MACRA/MIPS: Chutes & Ladders 2.0 – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on November 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/17 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jim Tate (@jimtate) from EMR Advocate and MIPS Consulting on the topic of “MACRA/MIPS: Chutes & Ladders 2.0.”

As Meaningful Use fades into the sunset we witness the arrival of the MACRA/MIPS program. The most significant change in Medicare Part B reimbursement in a generation has arrived. Fueled by the shift to “pay for value”, this zero-sum legislation guarantees there will be winners and losers. I am reminded of the childhood board game, Chutes & Ladders, where you were either climbing up or sliding down.

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: Is MACRA/MIPS fair to providers? #hitsm

T2: How prepared are Eligible Clinicians for MACRA/MIPS? #hitsm

T3: What are the potential impacts of the MIPS Composite Performance Scores being made public? #hitsm

T4: Part B drugs will be included in MIPS eligibility and reimbursement calculations. What are the possible consequences? #hitsm

T5: Will MACRA/MIPS deliver better care at a lower cost? #hitsm

Bonus: If you had the power to change anything, what would you change with MACRA/MIPS? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
11/24 – Thanksgiving Break!
Show some gratitude on Thanksgiving by thanking someone in the #HITsm community!

12/1 – Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout
Hosted by Gabe Charbonneau, MD (@gabrieldane)

12/8 – TBD
Hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from @MyOpenNotes)

12/15 – TBD
Hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave)

12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Medical Data Impact to Financial Health, Disability and Job Protection – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on November 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/10 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Kimberly George (@kimberlyanngeo) from @sedgwick on the topic of “Medical Data Impact to Financial Health, Disability and Job Protection.”

Short term disability, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and similar leave of absence programs – including workers’ compensation – are designed to ensure the employment and income of the American worker is protected at a time of illness or injury. Regardless as to whether an employee is seeking wage reimbursement, a leave of absence, or a job accommodation, sufficient, accurate and timely medical documentation is required.

But what happens when accurate medical documentation is not received? Is incomplete? Or not received on a timely basis? The request for benefits is placed in a pending or denied status, wages are not paid or significantly delayed, and challenges mount for the patient.

While the burden to submit medical records, and supporting documentation falls to the patient, there is an uptick in payer and employer interest to help solve for the challenges of obtaining sufficient medical information on a timely basis. Medical documentation often requires diagnosis, subjective and objective medical information, including an assessment of functionality pertinent to the patient’s physical capabilities. This functional assessment is often defined by the benefit plan, law, and the employer’s policy.

Receipt of medical information on a timely basis is a major factor in the denial of disability benefits for people seeking support for a disability, leave of absence or workers compensation claim. Number one reason for a reversal of the denial is late receipt of the medical documentation.

The objective of this chat is for #HITsm community to share their insight, ideas and opinions about the identification, collection, and sharing of a patient’s medical and functional status with proper release of information to the payer directly. Quite simply, how can technology, process, policy and people speed up the process so patients and payers have the medical records needed to make accurate, timely and fair benefit decisions?

Reference Materials:

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: What issues, obstacles and/or missing capabilities prevent or hinder an individual’s ability to collect their medical records? #HITsm

T2: How are patients impacted when benefit approval requires medical documentation and medical records are not available? #HITsm

T3: How can patients, support networks, employers, government or others support the capture, storage & retrieval of medical records? #HITsm

T4: What technologies and/or new approaches can assist w/ capture, storage & retrieval of medical record data? #HITsm

T5: What reasonable policy and/or regulatory changes could be implemented to accelerate & expedite benefit processing on behalf of consumers? #HITsm

Bonus: What stakeholders, resources, & companies should be engaged to assist w/ building & delivering a medical records collection solution? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
11/17 – MACRA/MIPS: Chutes & Ladders 2.0
Hosted by Jim Tate (@jimtate) from EMR Advocate and MIPS Consulting.

11/24 – Thanksgiving Break!

12/1 – Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout
Hosted by Gabe Charbonneau, MD (@gabrieldane)

12/8 – TBD
Hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from @MyOpenNotes)

12/15 – TBD
Hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.