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Interesting and Funny Insights Into EHR and Health Information Management

Posted on October 20, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last week I had the chance to attend the Craneware Summit in Las Vegas. It was a really interesting event where I had the chance to meet and talk with a wide variety of people from across the spectrum of healthcare. I love getting these added perspectives.

One of the sessions I attended was an E&M session which provided some really interesting insights into the life of an E&M coder and how they look at things. There’s a lot more to their job, but I tweeted these comments because they made me laugh and illustrated part of the challenge they face in a new EMR world.


I thought these immediate responses to the question were interesting. They came from a crowd of HIM and coding professionals. Overall, they were quite supportive of EMR it seemed.


Many doctors don’t understand this. That’s why so many coders still have jobs.


Too funny.


Said like a true coder.

Funny ICD-10 Codes Have Ruined the ICD-10 Branding

Posted on October 17, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The people at online physician community, QuantiaMD, recently sent me a list of the top 3 “Crazy ICD-10 Codes” that they got from their community. It was quite interesting to learn that when they asked their community for these codes, they yielded double the participation the company typically sees. No doubt, physicians have globbed on to these funny and crazy ICD-10 codes. I’ll be honest. I’ve gotten plenty of laughs over some of the funny ICD-10 codes as well. Seriously, you can’t make some of this stuff up. Here’s a look at the top 3 crazy ICD-10 codes they received (and some awesome color commentary from the nominators):

1. W16.221 – Fall into bucket of water, causing drowning and submersion. I didn’t realize mopping the floor was so dangerous!
2. 7. Z63.1 – Problems in relationship with in-laws. Really, Who does not?
3. V9733xD – Sucked into jet engine, subsequent encounter. Oops I did it again.

While these codes are amazing and in many respects ridiculous, they’re so over the top that they’ve branded ICD-10 as a complete joke. For every legitimate story about the value of ICD-10 there have probably been 10 stories talking about the funny and crazy ICD-10 codes. You can imagine which story goes viral. Are you going to share the story that talks about improvement in patient care or the one that makes you laugh? How come the story about their being no ICD-9 code for Ebola hasn’t gone viral (Yes, ICD-10 has a code for Ebola)?

Unfortunately, I don’t think the proponents of ICD-10 have done a great job making sure that the dialog on the benefits of ICD-10 is out there as well. Yes, it’s an uphill battle, but most things of worth require a fight and can easily get drowned out by humor and minutiae if you give up. If ICD-10 really is that valuable, then it’s well worth the fight.

My fear is that it might be too late for ICD-10. Changing the ICD-10 brand that has been labeled as a joke is going to be nearly impossible to change. However, there are some key people on the side of ICD-10. CMS for starters. If you can get the law passed, then the ICD-10 branding won’t matter.

One thing I do know is that doing nothing means we’ll get more and more articles about Funny ICD-10 codes and little coverage of why ICD-10 needs to be implemented. I encourage those who see the value in ICD-10 to make sure their telling that part of the story. If you don’t have your own platform to share that part of the story, I’ll be happy to offer mine. Just drop me a note on my contact us page.

Are You a Healthcare Data Hoarder?

Posted on October 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m thinking I need to start a new healthcare reality TV show called “Healthcare Data Hoarders.” We’ll go into healthcare institutions (after signing our HIPAA lives away), and take a look through all the data a healthcare organization is storing away.

My guess is that we wouldn’t have to look very far to find some really amazing healthcare data hoarders. The healthcare data hoarding I see happening in comes in two folds: legacy systems and data warehouses.

Legacy Systems – You know the systems I’m talking about. They’re the ones stored under a desk in the back of radiology. The software is no longer being updated. In fact, the software vendor is often not even around anymore. However, for some reason you think you’re going to need the data off that system that’s 30 years old and only one person in your entire organization knows how to access the legacy software. Yes, I realize there are laws that require healthcare organizations to “hoard” data to some extent. However, many of these legacy systems are well past those legal data retention requirements.

Data Warehouses – These come in all shapes and sizes and for this hoarding article let me suggest that an EHR is kind of a data warehouse (yes, I’m using a really broad definition). Much like a physical hoarder, I see a lot of organizations in healthcare that are gathering virtual piles of data for which they have no use and will likely never find a way to use it. Historically, a data warehouse manager’s job is to try and collect, normalize, and aggregate all of the healthcare organizations data into one repository. Yes, the data warehouse manager is really the Chief Healthcare Data Hoarder. Gather and protect and and all data you can find.

While I love the idea that we’re collecting data that can hopefully make healthcare better, just collecting data doesn’t do anything to improve healthcare. In fact, it can often retard efforts to leverage healthcare data to improve health. The problem is that the healthcare data that can be leveraged for good is buried under all of this useless data. It takes so much effort to sift through the junk data that people just stop before they even get started.

Are you collecting data and not doing anything with it? I challenge you to remedy that situation.

Is your healthcare organization a healthcare data hoarder?

Are You HIPAA Secure?

Posted on October 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently asked to provide some tips on health IT and data security for a healthcare lawyer’s website. You can see the final blog post here, but I thought I’d share the 3 suggestions and tips I sent to them.

1. Encrypt all of your computers that store PHI (Protected Health Information) – If your hard drive is lost or stolen and it’s not encrypted, you’ll pay the price big time. However, if it’s encrypted you won’t have to worry nearly as much.

2. Avoid Sending SMS Messages with PHI – SMS is not HIPAA secure and there are plenty of high quality secure, HIPAA compliant text message options out there. Find one you like and use it. While being secure it also has other features like the ability to see if the recipient has read the message or not.

3. Do a HIPAA Risk Assessment – Not only is this required by HIPAA and meaningful use, it’s a good thing to do for your patients. Don’t fake your way through the assessment. Really dig into the privacy and security risks of your organization and make reasonable choices to make sure that you’re protecting your health data.

No doubt there’s a lot more that could be said about this topic, but I think these three areas are a good place to start. A huge portion of the HIPAA breaches that have occurred could have been prevented by doing these three things.

If you have other suggestions for people, I’d love to hear them in the comments. I’m sure there are some more obvious ones that I’ve missed.

Google Helpouts Tested in Google Search Results – Dr. Google?

Posted on October 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It was first noticed by someone on Reddit and then confirmed by Engadget that Google has been testing a Google Helpout style feature which offers a telemedicine video visit with a doctor. You can see an image of the test Google search telemedicine integration below:
Google Helpout - Google Search Integration

This is a really interesting integration for a number of reasons. First, Google wasn’t charging for these initial test visits, but would no doubt charge for these visits in the future. Second, it takes an Act of God to get Google to integrate something into their cash cow: search results. That should tell us how serious Google is about doing these types of integrations.

I can already hear the naysayers who think this is a terrible idea. They might be right as a business. We’ll have to see how that plays out. The reimbursement model could a challenging one. Plus, there are plenty of reasons why this won’t work. Google will have to get really good at knowing when to offer a visit and when not to offer a visit. We’ll see if they want to make the investment required to understand when the visit is something that should be encouraged and when it shouldn’t be encouraged.

One thing I’ve observed with Telemedicine is that it can really work well…if you have the right situation. The reason Telemedicine has gotten a bad rap is that the naysayers have plenty of ammo they can use to explain why Telemedicine could be a terrible thing. These naysayers are correct. There are a bunch of healthcare situations where a telemedicine visit just isn’t going to work. However, just because something doesn’t solve 100% of the situations doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be used for the 30% of the time (I think it could be more than this) that it’s a beautifully elegant solution that’s just as effective as an in office visit?

As noted, this was just at trial by Google. Google is well known for trying things to see how they do and then scraping them after the trial. So, we’ll see how this goes. It does seem that Google can’t keep its hands out of healthcare. I think they see the trillion dollar industry and just can’t resist.

Patient Shark Tank at Digital Health Conference

Posted on October 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’ve been working with NYeC to promote the Digital Health Conference since the very first Digital Health Conference 4 years ago. It’s a great event and I get a chance to meet many of you readers there. Plus, I just love spending time in NYC. If you’ve never been, you can register here (20% off your registration when you use the discount code: HCS).

I just heard about a new feature at the conference this year: The Patient Shark Tank. Here’s a description of what they have in store:

How do we ensure that the patient voice is amplified in the design, the development, or enhancement of innovations created FOR the patient? Patient communities are emerging as key influencers and disrupting the healthcare landscape. They are impacting strategies, policies, and setting the stage for new patient-centric innovations. Patients are now sought after thought leaders influencing the way healthcare systems think about and interact with patients and prodding them to improve the patient experience.

Join us as our judges rate innovations from the patient and caregiver perspective and innovators build their perspective into the innovations designed to serve them. As each innovator pitches their concept or initiative, our patient and caregiver panelists will ask targeted questions based on their experiences to understand how the innovation uniquely addresses patient needs. In addition, we will integrate clinician perspective to understand whether a doctor would prescribe the innovation to their patients.

I’m a huge fan of Shark Tank, so I love the idea. I only hope that they’ve got a line up of judges that are as entertaining as Shark Tank. Sometimes these events can get pretty bland if they choose judges who are shy about sharing their opinions on a company or product. That doesn’t benefit the companies or the audience.

Unfortunately, you won’t have much time to get your idea submitted. The deadline to apply to pitch your innovative concept or initiative is Thursday, October 16th. I look forward to seeing what ideas get pitched at the event.

Meaningful Use Hardship Exceptions Reopened

Posted on October 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

CMS has announced its intent to reopen the Meaningful Use Hardship Exceptions filing period and set the new deadline for MU hardship exceptions to November 30, 2014. With the new hardship exception extension, providers can now choose from a number of reasons why they were unable to attest in time. Here’s the details from the CMS announcement:

This reopened hardship exception application submission period is for eligible professionals and eligible hospitals that:
* Have been unable to fully implement 2014 Edition CEHRT due to delays in 2014 Edition
CEHRT availability; AND
* Eligible professionals who were unable to attest by October 1, 2014 and eligible hospitals that were unable to attest by July 1, 2014 using the flexibility options provided in the CMS 2014 CEHRT Flexibility Rule.

These are the only circumstances that will be considered for this reopened hardship exception
application submission period.

This is a big move since the meaningful use hardship exceptions deadline for hospitals was April 1, 2014 and July 1, 2014 for eligible professionals. I imagine there are many organizations that will benefit from this extension. Although, there are probably quite a few organizations that wish they’d known about this exception before now or that think the exceptions are too narrow (ie. they can’t benefit from them).

What are your thoughts on this extension?

Patient Education, Records vs People, CareFusion Bought, and HIT Startup Story – Twitter Roundup

Posted on October 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Every once in a while I like to take a tour around Twitter and share some of the interesting tweets I’ve found. Plus, I usually provide a little bit of commentary on each. Here are a few that interested me today.


Quite the imagery indeed. I’ve been fascinated with images lately. You can consume them in a few seconds and it communicates something so quickly.


Lawrence Weed, MD was way ahead of his time. The EHR can easily make us forget about the person if we’re not careful. Reimbursement and MU checkoff lists don’t help either.


Not a bad day to be at CareFusion. Bought by BD for $12.2 Billion. It is interesting that Cardinal Health created it, spun it off and then its competitor bought it. A little too inside baseball for me.


This article is a great read if you’re a health IT startup company. I love Jeff’s description of the black box of healthcare. It’s true that if you try to have them come out of the box and do something different, it’s extremely hard. If you do something that feeds the black box, then they’ll buy it. Sad, but true.

Fun Friday Video from ZDoggMD

Posted on October 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The famously funnier than placebo and CEO of Turntable Health, ZDoggMD, has put out a great new healthcare parody video to Garth Brooks, Friends in Low Places. The video is called “Friends with Low Platelets.”

Turns out, I just discovered that ZDoggMD and I will be sharing the same stage at the Modernizing Medicine EHR user conference, EMA Nation, as part of my Fall Health IT conference schedule. I’ll let ZDoggMD go for the funny talk and I’ll take a more emotional storytelling approach. Should make for a great event.

Side Note: It’s great that Las Vegas is finally being recognized for it’s amazing Healthcare thought leaders (ZDoggMD and myself are both in Las Vegas). Ok, Las Vegas isn’t a hub for healthcare. We’re definitely punching above our weight class, but there’s something to say about Las Vegas doing interesting things in healthcare and health IT.

How Secure Are Wearables?

Posted on October 1, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 6000 articles with John having written over 3000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 13 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

JaneenB asks a really fantastic question in this tweet. Making sure that wearables are secure is going to be a really hot topic. Yesterday, I was talking with Mac McMillan from Cynergistek and he suggested that the FDA was ready to make medical device security a priority. I’ll be interested to see what the FDA does to try and regulate security in medical devices, but you can see why this is an important thing. Mac also commented that while it’s incredibly damaging for someone to hack a pacemaker like the one Vice President Cheney had (has?), the bigger threat is the 300 pumps that are installed in a hospital. If one of them can be hacked, they all can be hacked and the process for updating them is not simple.

Of course, Mac was talking about medical device security from more of an enterprise perspective. Now, let’s think about this across millions of wearable devices that are used by consumers. Plus, many of these consumer wearable devices don’t require FDA clearance and so the FDA won’t be able to impose more security restrictions on them.

I’m not really sure the answer to this problem of wearable security. Although, I think two steps in the right direction could be for health wearable companies to first build a culture of security into their company and their product. This will add a little bit of expense on the front end, but it will more than pay off on the back end when they avoid security issues which could literally leave the company in financial ruins. Second, we could use some organization to take on the effort of reporting on the security (or lack thereof) of these devices. I’m not sure if this is a consumer reports type organization or a media company. However, I think the idea of someone holding organizations accountable is important.

We’re definitely heading towards a world of many connected devices. I don’t think we have a clear picture of what this means from a security perspective.