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Healthcare Has Found the New World But Hasn’t Even Settled the 13 Colonies Yet

Posted on May 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was having a conversation recently about healthcare analytics. During that discussion I came up with what I think is the perfect analogy for where we are in the development of healthcare analytics solutions. I’d also include things like health sensors and genomics in this broad definition since the data from these efforts are all going to work to inform various healthcare analytics and clinical decision support solutions.

With that in mind, I think when it comes to these solutions for healthcare, it’s almost like Columbus has discovered a new world. A few other explorers have set foot on land in North or South America and so we know there’s a whole other world of discovery out there. However, from an exploration perspective we’ve barely landed. We know there’s a lot of possibility, but we don’t have any idea the full expanse of what’s still out there. Does this sound like healthcare analytics to you?

Continuing the analogy, we haven’t even settled the 13 colonies let alone discovered the midwest or even considered that the entire west is there with all of its unique possibilities. No, we’re just starting our exploration of what’s possible in healthcare now that we have so much more health data. We see a lot of promise and potential, but we still have to discover where there’s a gorgeous paradise and where there’s a worthless desert.

I love the analogy of explorers since there’s so much discovery that’s still possible in healthcare. All these new sensors and technology are like new boats that can take us new places that we would have never thought possible.

That said, this type of exploration is not for the faint of heart. Much like explorers, some are going to die searching for gold in the new world and die without ever finding it. However, those explorers that die trying lay the framework for all the others that come after. Their failures will help future healthcare explorers to avoid the challenges their predecessors faced.

In many ways, this is why I’m so excited about healthcare and the technology that’s going to facilitate all this new exploration. Some of the discoveries we’ll find are going to require as dramatic a culture shift as it was for the old world to believe Christopher Columbus when he said the world wasn’t flat. That’s going to be painful for many, but it’s going to happen.

Healthcare Data Standards Tweetstorm from Arien Malec

Posted on May 20, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you don’t follow Arien Malec on Twitter, you should. He’s got strong opinions and an inside perspective on the real challenges associated with healthcare data interoperability.

As proof, check out the following Healthcare Standards tweetstorm he posted (removed from the tweet for easy reading):

1/ Reminder: #MU & CEHRT include standards for terminology, content, security & transport. Covers eRx, lab, Transitions of Care.

2/ If you think we “don’t have interop” b/c no standards name, wrong.

3/ Standards could be ineffective, may be wrong, may not be implemented in practice, or other elts. missing

4/ But these are *different* problems from “gov’t didn’t name standards” & fixes are different too.

5/ e.g., “providers don’t want 60p CCDA documents” – data should be structured & incorporated.

6/ #actually both (structured data w/terminology & incorporate) are required by MU/certification.

7/ “but they don’t work” — OK, why? & what’s the fix?

8/ “Government should have invested in making the standards better”

9/ #actually did. NLM invested in terminology. @ONC_HealthIT invested in CCDA & LRU projects w/ @HL7, etc.

10/ “government shouldn’t have named standards unless they were known to work” — would have led to 0 named

11/ None of this is to say we don’t have silos, impediments to #interoperability, etc.

12/ but you can’t fix the problem unless you understand it first.

13/ & “gov’t didn’t name standards” isn’t the problem.

14/ So describe the problems, let’s work on fixing them, & abandon magical thinking & 🦄. The End.

Here was my immediate response to the tweetstorm:

I agree with much of what Arien says about their being standards and the government named the standards. That isn’t the reason that exchange of health information isn’t happening. As he says in his 3rd tweet above, the standards might not be effective, they may be implemented poorly, the standards might be missing elements, etc etc etc. However, you can’t say there wasn’t a standard and that the government didn’t choose a standard.

Can we just all be honest with ourselves and admit that many people in healthcare don’t want health data to be shared? If they did, we’d have solved this problem.

The good news is that there are some signs that this is changing. However, changing someone from not wanting to share data is a hard thing and usually happens in steps. You don’t just over night have a company or individual change their culture to one of open data sharing.

The Future of Healthcare Rests on the Backs of Our Ability to Influence Behavior

Posted on May 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This morning I was pondering the future of our healthcare system and the constantly changing and shifting world of healthcare reimbursement. Some observations are undeniable. Our current system is flawed and not sustainable. Something has to change.

As I look at all the changes happening in healthcare, I came to one major realization. Every program to reduce the cost of healthcare rests on the back of our ability to influence patients’ choices.

The future of health insurance companies hinges on their ability to change patients’ behavior. Looking at ACOs and MACRA, doctors reimbursement is going to be tied directly to the choices their patients make (or don’t make). Employers that are looking to lower their healthcare costs are going to invest in programs and technologies that ensure their patients are making healthy choices.

While many healthcare IT companies fall short of this goal, we do see some that are going to play a major role in influencing patient behavior. Take something as simple as a patient portal. Can access to your medical records influence your behaviors? Can access to your doctor or a nurse through a patient portal help influence the decisions you make? Absolutely. Do they go far enough? Absolutely not, but they’re a start.

Take a look at telemedicine. Will easy access to a doctor change our behavior? Could telemedicine mean that we choose to be seen by a doctor earlier as opposed to delaying a visit to the doctor because it’s too painful to schedule an appointment and go into the doctor? Absolutely. Plus, telemedicine is just one simple example of how we’re making a visit easier. Online self scheduling could influence this as well. A whole new wave of messaging apps and provider communities are forming which allow us to get “health care” remotely.

As I’ve written before, my fear is that most healthcare IT companies don’t go deep enough into the behavior change and instead focus mostly on process optimization. Behavior change is a surprising byproduct for some, but is certainly not their intention. In fact, that’s true for most of the examples I describe above.

It becomes more and more clear to me every day that the real breakout companies in healthcare are going to be those who figure out how to influence patients’ behavior. That includes influencing them the 98% (or whatever the correct stat is) of time that patients spend outside of the exam room. Every reimbursement effort is going to be focused around it.

The real challenge for these companies is going to be tracking and quantifying the value they created. It’s hard to track attribution when it comes to a patient’s health. It’s so complex that it’s easy to incorrectly assess who or what is responsible for a patient’s improved health. Plus, it’s extremely hard to quantify the benefit of these behavior changes. A company focuses on influencing patients’ behaviors is also going to have to get really good at tracking the benefit of that influence and attribution of what influenced the patient.

These are extremely challenging opportunities. Healthcare is full of them. I already see some companies heading down this path. I’m excited to see which ones really break through.

The Perfect EHR Workflow – Video EHR

Posted on May 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been floating this idea out there for years (2006 to be exact), but I’d never put it together in one consolidated post that I could point to when talking about the concept. I call it the Video EHR and I think it could be the solution to many of our current EHR woes. I know that many of you will think it’s a bit far fetched and in some ways it is. However, I think we’re culturally and technically almost to the point where the video EHR is a feasible opportunity.

The concept is very simple. Put video cameras in each exam room and have those videos replace your EHR.

Technical Feasibility
Of course there are some massive technical challenges to make this a reality. However, the cost of everything related to this idea has come down in price significantly. The cost of HD video cameras negligible. The cost of video storage, extremely cheap and getting cheaper every day. The cost of bandwidth, cheaper and higher quality and so much potential to grow as more cities get fiber connectivity. If this was built on the internal network instead of the cloud, bandwidth is an easily solved issue.

When talking costs, it’s important to note that there would be increased costs over the current documentation solutions. No one is putting in high quality video cameras and audio equipment to record their visits today. Not to mention wiring the exam room so that it all works. So, this would be an added cost.

Otherwise, the technology is all available today. We can easily record, capture and process HD video and even synchronize it across multiple cameras, etc. None of this is technically a challenge. Voice recognition and NLP have progressed significantly so you could process the audio file and convert it into granular data elements that would be needed for billing, clinical decision support, advanced care, population health, etc. These would be compiled into a high quality presentation layer that would be useful for providers to consume data from past visits.

Facial recognition technology has also progressed to the point that we could use these videos to help address the patient identification and patient matching problems that plague healthcare today. We’d have to find the right balance between trusting the technology and human verification, but it would be much better and likely more convenient than what we have today.

Imagine the doctor walking into the exam room where the video cameras in the exam room have already identified the patient and it would identify the doctor as she walked in. Then, the patient’s medical record could be automatically pulled up on the doctor’s tablet and available to them as they’re ready to see the patient.

Plus, does the doctor even need a tablet at all? Could they instead use big digital signs on the walls which are voice controlled by a Siri or Alexa like AI solution. I can already hear, “Alexa, pull up John Lynn’s cholesterol lab results for the past year.” Next thing you know, a nice chart of my cholesterol appears on the big screen for both doctor and patient to see.

Feels pretty far fetched, but all of the technology I describe is already here. It just hasn’t been packaged in a way that makes sense for this application.

Pros
Ideal Workflow for Providers – I can think of no better workflow for a doctor or nurse. Assuming the tech works properly (and that’s a big assumption will discuss in the cons), the provider walks into the exam room and engages with the patient. Everything is documented automatically. Since it’s video, I mean literally everything would be documented automatically. The providers would just focus on engaging with the patient, learning about their health challenges, and addressing their issues.

Patient Experience – I’m pretty sure patients wouldn’t know what to do if their doctor or nurse was solely focused on them and wasn’t stuck with their head in a chart or in their screen. It would totally change patients’ relationship with their doctors.

Reduced Liability – Since you literally would have a multi angle video and audio recording of the visit, you’d have the proof you’d need to show that you had offered specific instructions or that you’d warned of certain side effects or any number of medical malpractice issues could be resolved by a quick look at the video from the visit. The truth will set you free, and you’d literally have the truth about what happened during the visit on video.

No Click Visit – This really is part of the “Ideal Workflow” section, but it’s worth pointing out all the things that providers do today to document in their EHR. The biggest complaint is the number of clicks a doctor has to do. In the video EHR world where everything is recorded and processed to document the visit you wouldn’t have any clicks.

Ergonomics – I’ve been meaning to write a series of posts on the health consequences doctors are experiencing thanks to EHR software. I know many who have reported major back trouble due to time spent hunched over their computer documenting in the EHR. You can imagine the risk of carpal tunnel and other hand and wrist issues that are bound to come up. All of this gets resolved if the doctor literally walks into the exam room and just sees the patient. Depending on how the Video EHR is implemented, the doctor might have to still spend time verifying the documentation or viewing past documentation. However, that could most likely be done on a simple tablet or even using a “Siri”-like voice implementation which is much better ergonomically.

Learning – In mental health this happens all the time. Practicum students are recording giving therapy and then a seasoned counselor advises them on how they did. No doubt we could see some of the same learning benefits in a medical practice. Sometimes that would be through peer review, but also just the mere fact of a doctor watching themselves on camera.

Cons
Privacy – The biggest fear with this idea is that most people think this is or could be a major privacy issue. They usually ask the question, “Will patients feel comfortable doing this?” On the privacy front, I agree that video is more personal than granular data elements. So, the video EHR would have to take extreme precautions to ensure the privacy and security of these videos. However, from an impact standpoint, it wouldn’t be that much different than granular health information being breached. Plus, it’s much harder to breach a massive video file being sent across the wire than a few granular text data elements. No doubt, privacy and security would be a challenge, but it’s a challenge today as well. I don’t think video would be that much more significant.

As to the point of whether patients would be comfortable with a video in the exam room, no doubt there would need to be a massive culture shift. Some may never reach the point that they’re comfortable with it. However, think about telemedicine. What are patients doing in telemedicine? They’re essentially having their patient visit on video, streamed across the internet and a lot of society is very comfortable with it. In fact, many (myself included) wish that telemedicine were more widely available. No doubt telemedicine would break down the barriers when it comes to the concept of a video EHR. I do acknowledge that a video EHR takes it to another level and they’re not equal. However, they are related and illustrate that people’s comfort in having their medical visits on video might not be as far fetched as it might seem on the surface.

Turns out that doctors will face the same culture shift challenge as patients and they might even be more reluctant than patients.

Trust – I believe this is currently the biggest challenge with the concept of a video EHR. Can providers trust that the video and audio will be captured? What happens if it fails to capture? What happens if the quality of the video or audio isn’t very good? What is the voice recognition or NLP isn’t accurate and something bad happens? How do we ensure that everything that happens in the visit is captured accurately?

Obviously there are a lot of challenges associated with ensuring the video EHR’s ability to capture and document the visit properly. If it doesn’t it will lose providers and patients’ trust and it will fail. However, it’s worth remembering that we don’t necessarily need it to be perfect. We just need it to be better than our current imperfect status quo. We also just need to design the video EHR to avoid making mistakes and warn about possible missing information so that it can be addressed properly. No doubt this would be a monumental challenge.

Requires New Techniques – A video EHR would definitely require modifications in how a provider sees a patient. For example, there may be times where a patient or the doctor need to be positioned a certain way to ensure the visit gets documented properly. You can already see one of the cameras being a portable camera that can be used for close up shots of rashes or other medical issues so that they’re documented properly.

No doubt providers would have to learn new techniques on what they say in the exam room to make sure that things are documented properly. Instead of just thinking something, they’ll have to ensure that they speak clinical orders, findings, diagnosis, etc. We could have a long discussion on the impact for good and bad of this type of transparency.

Double Edged Sword of Liability – While reduced liability is a pro, liability could also be a con for a video EHR. Having the video of a medical visit can set you free, but it can also be damning as well. If you practice improper medicine, you won’t have anywhere to hide. Plus, given our current legal environment, even well intentioned doctors could get caught in challenging situations if the technology doesn’t work quite right or the video is taken out of context.

Reality Check
I realize this is a massive vision with a lot of technical and cultural challenges that would need to be overcome. Although, when I first came up with the idea of a video EHR ~10 years ago, it was even more far fetched. Since then, so many things have come into place that make this idea seem much more reasonable.

That said, I’m realistic that a solution like this would likely start with some sort of half and half solution. The video would be captured, but the provider would need to verify and complete the documentation to ensure its accuracy. We couldn’t just trust the AI engine to capture everything and be 100% accurate.

I’m also interested in watching the evolution of remote scribes. In many ways, a remote scribe is a human doing the work of the video EHR AI engine. It’s an interesting middle ground which could illustrate the possibilities and also be a small way to make patients and providers more comfortable with cameras in the exam room.

I do think our current billing system and things like meaningful use (or now MACRA) are still a challenge for a video EHR. The documentation requirements for these programs are brutal and could make the video EHR workflow lose its luster. Could it be done to accommodate the current documentation requirements? Certainly, but it might take some of the polish off the solution.

There you have it. My concept for a video EHR. What do you think of the idea? I hope you tear it up in the comments.

Personalized Medicine Survey and Infographic

Posted on May 11, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

SAP Healthcare has gotten together with Oxford Economics in a survey of 120 healthcare professionals to understand what they’re doing with personalized medicine. You can check out this whitepaper which details the findings of the research or check out the personalized medicine infographic below.

I was most interested in the tools section (near the end) of the infographic below. It’s not surprising that most healthcare professionals say that big data capture and storage tools and predictive analytics tools are essential to personalized medicine. I think that’s a reflection of where we’re at with personalized medicine. We’ll know we’ve entered the next phase of personalized medicine once more organizations want to include collaboration tools and decision support tools in their efforts.

What pieces of this infographic or the research linked above stood out to you?

Personalized Medicine Iinfographic

Vice President Joe Biden Speaks at Health Datapalooza

Posted on May 10, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve always wanted to attend Health Datapalooza. It seems like a great event and has a really amazing group of people. However, it’s always in DC (at least so far) and I didn’t want to travel. So, I’ve had to follow along from home watching the #hdpalooza hashtag. There’s been a lot of great insights into healthcare and what’s happening with healthcare.

One session I really wanted to see was Vice President Joe Biden’s keynote. The good thing is that ePatient Dave recorded it on his iPad and made it available:

Considering Biden’s involvement in the Cancer Moonshot and his own personal experience in the healthcare system taking care of his son, he provides some great perspective.

Discussion on Medical Errors as the 3rd Most Common Cause of Death

Posted on May 9, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Social media and mainstream media is abuzz with this article in BMJ by Martin A Makary and Michael Daniel entitled “Medical error—the third leading cause of death in the US.” This image summarizes the headlines most people wrote:

Medical Errors and Leading Cause of Death in US

While this makes for a great headline, most of the journalists and those in the media evaluating the BMJ article do like they usually do and run the headline without actually digging into the details of the study itself. Lucky for us, David Gorski, has published a really great analysis of the article on the Science-Based Medicine blog. I won’t summarize it here, since you should go and read David’s article in full. We’ll be here when you get back.

What everyone acknowledges is that medical errors take the lives of many in the US Health System. In fact, it happens in every health system. What’s also clear from this discussion is that there are A LOT of complexities associated with how you define when a death was caused by medical error, what is defined as a medical error, etc etc etc. David’s article above finishes with this summary on the importance of patient safety and decreasing death due to medical errors which is the point I think we should take from it all:

Over the last three years, I’ve learned for myself from firsthand experience just how difficult it is to improve the quality of patient care. I’ve also learned from firsthand experience that nowhere near all adverse outcomes are due to negligence or error on the part of physicians and nurses. None of this is to say that every effort shouldn’t be made to improve patient safety. Absolutely that should be a top health care policy priority. It’s an effort that will require the rigorous application of science-based medicine on top of expenditures to make changes in the health care system, as well as agreement on exactly how to define and measure medical errors. After all, one death due to medical error is too much, and even if the number is “only” 20,000 that is still too high and needs urgent attention to be brought down. Unfortunately, I also know that, human systems being what they are, the rate will never be reduced to zero. That shouldn’t stop us from trying to make that number as close to zero as we can.

Unfortunately, I believe that false headlines with inflated numbers don’t help us understand the real problem and address it. The inflated numbers from the so called “study” just cause us to confuse the issues. The numbers really don’t pass the “smell test” on a number of levels. Not the least of which, from my perspective, is that we don’t have more medical malpractice lawsuits. In this sue happy society, if there were 251k deaths due to medical error, we’d have many more medical malpractice lawsuits out there. David explains a bunch more reasons why the numbers don’t make sense and why they’re really hard to calculate, so go and read those if you want a more detailed analysis.

Gong back to the earlier quote. Even if the number was 20,000, that’s still far too many. We know medical errors cause death and we should work hard to prevent that from happening. Since I write from a tech perspective, I’m interested in thinking about how technology could impact these medical error rates.

From a tech perspective, I always find it interesting to read stories about the way EHR software can help prevent medical errors. The basic analysis usually points to things like drug to drug interaction checking, drug to allergy interaction checking, and other clinical decision support tools. No doubt simple checks like this can have an impact on the number of medical errors in a healthcare organization. We’ll leave the discussions of alert fatigue for another discussion.

Very few people would argue against the concept that having the right information at the right time will help doctors and nurses reduce medical errors. Ideally, that’s what technology should help facilitate. Plus, technology should help analyze massive amounts of health data (both personal and general) in order to facilitate the provider in their care of the patient. In many cases, that’s exactly what technology can and does do for healthcare. However, we’re not living in an ideal world. Technology can also increase the number of medical errors when implemented poorly or improperly.

In some cases, EHR software perpetuates misinformation and leads to providers having the wrong information at the wrong time. Sometimes the clinical decision support algorithms fail. I could go on and on about the potential issues. These are a problem and now that EHR software is a major part of most health systems, we’re going to see the number of medical errors due to EHR software increase. However, in doing so, we shouldn’t forget that paper had its own medical error issues as well.

Another major cause of medical errors related to EHR software is when providers create an over reliance on the software for clinical decision making. This concern is often couched as “new doctors don’t know how to see patients without an EHR.” I think this concern only partially explains the risk of medical errors that we could experience if we’re not careful with our over reliance on technology in the care we provide patients.

Just this weekend I had this experience in my own personal life. We were headed to a new restaurant on Saturday night. We plugged the address into the GPS and started following the instructions it gave us to get to the restaurant. After turning into an apartment complex, we knew that we’d relied a little too much on technology and it had led us astray.

The banter between my wife and I was telling. As the GPS told us to turn into the apartment complex I told my wife that something didn’t feel right about these directions. My wife told me that it said to turn there. It was easy for me to succumb to my wife’s reliance on technology and not follow my own intuition and experience to navigate us a better direction.

In my wife and I’s case, nothing too serious was on the line (although the kids were getting antsy in the back of the car). Sure, it took us about 5 more minutes to get to the restaurant, but we made it without any major harm. The same isn’t true in healthcare where if providers aren’t careful, their over reliance on technology can cause medical errors that could even lead to loss of life. Plus, group think about technologies ability (or inabilities) can also cause trouble.

Like most things in life, we can take any of these approaches too far. We can’t be irrational about any specific approach since these are complex problems which require a detailed approach to understanding and mitigating their impact. Sometimes technology can be the solution to medical errors, but it can also be the problem if we’re not careful. It always takes the right balance to make sure we’re reducing medical errors as much as possible while not causing new ones.

Fun Friday – Siemens Healthineers Video

Posted on May 6, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As you probably know, each Friday we try and share something funny or entertaining to start your weekend. This week I’m not sure if this is funny, sad, scary, disappointing, or all of the above. In case you missed it, Siemens Healthcare renamed their business to Siemens Healthineers. No, this is not a joke. No, it’s not an Onion article. It’s too late for April Fool’s day. They really did rename their healthcare business to Siemens Healthineers. Everyone is wondering how much money they paid for that misguided choice.

Of course, to layer on the absurdity, it looks like Siemens also did a big announcement party for the new name and someone shared it on YouTube:

If you made it through the whole video, I’m sorry. You’ll never get that 3 minutes of your life back. I can only imagine how much it cost to produce that event. I guess they’re using the $1.3 billion they got from Cerner when they sold a big chunk of their EHR healthcare business to fund it.

The reactions to the name change and party in the comments of the YouTube video are pretty brutal. Here’s one example:

So they spent all this money on renting the space, bringing in all that equipment, paying people to write and sing the song, etc when they could have given all the employee’s raises.

Followed by this comment from someone who seems to have been there:

They also had a helicopter landing platform plus roadblocks for the whole area. And yes, it was just to announce the second rename in 12 months.

My comment is simply, “And we wonder why healthcare is so expensive.” I guess they’re living the principle that no PR is bad PR.

Of course, this YouTube video comment took the cake for me:

Corporate: How do we motivate our employees?
Drone: We could pay them more or improve their benefits?
Corporate: Don’t be stupid! We’ll do a power rangers routine on stage instead, it’ll be great.

Nothing like power rangers to improve company morale. Do you all feel more motivated? Go forth and be healthcare pioneers!

2 Major Problems with MACRA

Posted on May 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Everyone’s started to dive into the 10 million page MACRA (that might be an exaggeration, but it feels about that long) and over the next months we’ll be sure to talk about the details a lot more. However, I know that many healthcare organizations are tired of going through incredibly lengthy regulations before they’re final. Makes sense that people don’t want to go through all the details just for them to change.

As I look at MACRA from a very high level, I see at least two major problems with how MACRA will impact healthcare.

Loss of EHR Innovation
First, much like meaningful use and EHR certification, MACRA is going to suck the life out of EHR development teams. For 2-3 years, EHR roadmaps have been nothing but basically conforming to meaningful use and EHR certification. Throw in ICD-10 development for good measure and EHR development teams have basically had to be coding their application to a government standard instead of customer requests and unique innovations.

Just today I heard the Founder of SOAPware, Randall Oates, MD, say “I’m grieving MACRA to a great degree.” He’s grieving because he knows that for many months his company won’t be able to focus on innovation, but will instead focus on meeting government requirements. In fact, he said as much when he said, “We don’t have the liberty to be innovative and creative.” And no, meeting government regulations in an innovative way doesn’t meet that desire.

I remember going to lunch with a very small EHR vendor a year or so ago. I first met him pre-meaningful use and he loved being able to develop a unique EHR platform that made a doctor more efficient. He kept his customer base small so that he could focus on the needs of a small group of doctors. Fast forward to our lunch a year or so ago. He’d chosen to become a certified EHR and make it so his customers could attest to meaningful use. Meaningful use made it so he hated his EHR development process and he had lost all the fire he’d had to really create something beautiful for doctors.

The MACRA requirements will continue to suck the innovation out of EHR vendors.

New Layers of Work With No Relief
When you look at MACRA, we have all of these new regulations and requirements, but don’t see any real relief from the old models. It’s great to speak hypothetically about the move to value based reimbursement, but we’re only dipping our toe in those waters and so we can’t replace all of the old reimbursement requirements. In some ways it makes sense why CMS would take a cautious approach to entering the value based world. However, MACRA does very little to reduce the burden on the backs of physicians and healthcare organizations. In fact, in many ways it adds to their reporting burden.

Yes, there was some relief offered when it comes to meaningful use moving from the all or nothing approach and a small reduction in the number of measures. However, when it comes to value based reimbursement, MACRA seems to just be adding more reporting burdens on doctors without removing any of the old fashioned fee for service requirements.

MACRA is not like ICD-10. Once ICD-10 was implemented you could see how ICD-9 and the skills required for that coding set will eventually be fully replaced and you won’t need that skill or capability anymore. The same doesn’t seem to be true with value based care. There’s no sign that value based care will be a full replacement of anything. Instead, it just adds another layer of complexity, regulation, and reporting to an already highly regulated healthcare economic system.

This is why it’s no surprise that many are saying that MACRA will be the end of small practices. At scale, they’re onerous. Without scale, these regulations can be the death of a practice. It’s not like you can stop doing something else and learn the new MACRA regulations. No, MACRA is mostly additive without removing a healthcare organization’s previous burdens. Watch for more practices to leave Medicare. Although, even that may not be a long term solution since most commercial payers seem to follow Medicare’s lead.

While I think that CMS and the people that work there have their hearts in the right place, these two problems have me really afraid for what’s to come in health IT. EHR vendors the past few months were finally feeling some freedom to listen to their customers and develop something new and unique. I was excited to see how EHR vendors would make their software more efficient and provide better care. MACRA will likely hijack those efforts.

On the other side of the fence, doctors are getting more and more burnt out. These new MACRA regulations just add one more burden to their backs without removing any of the ones that bothered them before. Both of these problems don’t paint a pretty picture for the future of healthcare.

The great part is that MACRA is currently just a proposed rule. CMS has the opportunity to fix these problems. However, it will require them to take a big picture look at the regulation as opposed to just looking at the impact of an individual piece. If they’re willing to focus MACRA on the big wins and cut out the parts with questionable or limited benefits, then we could get somewhere. I’m just not sure if Andy Slavitt and company are ready to say “Scalpel!” and start cutting.

Managing Your Large Medical Equipment Purchases

Posted on May 3, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live video interview, you can find the recorded video here:

On Thursday, May 5, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT) join us for a live video interview with Nancy Hannan, Philips Relationship Director at Augusta University Health System (formerly known as Georgia Regents) where we’ll be discussing the unique approach Nancy and her team at Augusta University Health System have taken to acquisition and management of their large medical purchases through a unique alliance with Philips.
2016 May - Managing Your Large Medical Equipment Purchases-blog
The great part is that you can join my live conversation with Nancy and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask her questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Thursday, May 5, 2016 at Noon ET (9 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 20-30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

We hope you’ll join us live or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation. Nancy has some really great insights to share from the unique alliance between Philips and Augusta University Health System. We’ll talk about the challenges they faced in managing and replacing old medical equipment and the proactive efforts they’re taking to ensure that their patients and providers are getting the highest quality, safest care possible.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.