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Looking at EHR Internationally

Posted on August 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today, I’m sitting in my hotel room in Dubai (Check out my full health IT conference schedule) looking out over this incredible city. This is the 3rd time I’ve come to Dubai to teach an EHR workshop and so I’ve had a chance to fall in love with some many things. Not the least of which is the people that come to participate in the workshop. Each time is a unique perspective with people coming from around the middle east including countries like Saudia Arabia, Oman, Bahrain, Qatar, and of course Abu Dhabi and Dubai in the UAE to name a few.

There’s something incredible about coming to a place that is culturally so different and yet when I talk about EHR software it’s more alike than it is different. A great example of this is the often large divide between doctors and EHR implementers. It seems that everyone struggles to get doctors to take enough time to really learn how to use the EHR effectively. Then, despite not doing the training they complain that the EHR doesn’t work properly. If you’ve ever been part of an EHR implementation you know this cycle well.

What I find interesting in the middle east is that they don’t feel suffocated by regulations like we have in the US. There’s much more freedom available to them to innovate. However, there’s not the same drive to innovate here that exists in most US markets. It’s interesting to sense this disconnect between the opportunity to innovate and the desire to innovate.

I think there’s also a bit of a misconception about the region. From the US perspective, we often see these rich middle eastern countries and think that they just have as much money as they want and they can spend lavishly on anything. When you look at some of the amazing buildings or the indoor ski slopes in Dubai it’s easy to see how this perspective is well deserved. However, that’s not the reality that most of these healthcare organizations face. This seems to be particularly true with gas prices being quite low. In many ways, this is a similar to what many doctors experience. Doctors like to drive the Mercedes, but then complain that they aren’t really paid as much as people think. That creates a disconnect between what’s seen and the reality. I think the middle east suffers from this disconnect as well.

What’s most heartening about the experience of talking EHR internationally is that there’s one core thing that seems to exist everywhere. That’s a desire to truly make a difference for the patient. That’s the beautiful part of working in healthcare. We all have a desire to make life better for a patient. It’s amazing how this principle is universal. Now, if we could just all execute it better.

Symptoms of the Healthcare Debate

Posted on August 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This healthcare cartoon seemed to capture my feelings about much of the healthcare debate that’s happening right now. It’s even worse thanks to the current presidential race.
Healthcare Cartoon - Symptoms of the Healthcare Debate

This cartoon might offer a much simpler explanation for the healthcare cost challenges we face:
Healthcare Costs in the US

A part of me just wants to turn it all off, but it’s a battle that’s too important to ignore. Have a great weekend!

Taking Healthcare Communication to the Next Level

Posted on August 17, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, we’ve been doing an ongoing series of Healthcare Scene Interviews where we talk to top leaders in healthcare IT. They’ve been a huge success and we just passed our 50th video interview. If you’ve attended one of our live interviews, you know that we grew quite fond of the Blab platform that we used to host these interviews. Unfortunately, we just got word that Blab has been shutdown. It was a sad day, but we still have options.

While we loved Blab, we use to do our interviews on Google Hangouts and so we’re planning to go back there again to keep bringing you great content and discussion about the challenges that face Healthcare IT. Plus, Google Hangouts has been merged into YouTube Live and that brings some great opportunities for those watching both the live and recorded version at home including being able to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube.

With that as background, I’m excited to announce our next Healthcare interview happening Friday August 19, 2016 at 11:30 AM ET (8:30 AM PT) where we’ll be talking about “Taking Healthcare Communication to the Next Level.” This is an extremely important and challenging topic, but we’ve lined up a number of incredible experts to take part in our discussion as you’ll see below:

Taking Healthcare Communication to the Next Level-Headshots

You can watch the interview live and even join in the conversation in the chat on the sidebar by watching on the Healthcare Scene YouTube page or the embedded video below:


(You’ll have to visit the YouTube page to see the live chat since the embed doesn’t include the chat.)

We look forward to learning about healthcare communication from this panel of experts. Please join us and offer your own insights in the chat or ask these amazing panelists your most challenging questions.

Be sure to Subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube to be updated on our future interviews or watch our archive of past Healthcare Scene Interviews.

Major IT Projects and Consulting – Fun Friday

Posted on August 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday and so time for a little bit of healthcare IT humor. This one probably hits home if you’re working in a major health system and are suffering in a mess of projects. When you think about it, it’s no wonder that so many health systems have gone all in with one death star EHR.

Star Wars Enterprise Health IT Cartoon

This is humorous until you have to pay the consulting bill. This message is an old one and well worth remembering as you work with consultants. Consultants aren’t bad, but be sure you use them effectively.
Consulting Despair Graphic

ZDoggMD Sings 7 Years (A Life In Medicine) – The Path to Health 3.0

Posted on August 5, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Rather than try to explain this ZDoggMD video, I thought this comment from Riley Mcnamara on ZDoggMD’s latest video described it best:

I’m dealing with a lot of crap right now in the clinic, we’re over booked with patients, EHR headaches, and a never ending stream of useless bureaucracy. It’s been one of those weeks that made me question if I can do this. This made me feel better even if it’s just for a little bit! It’s not easy, but I’d never dream of doing anything else! Thanks man!

There truly is a battle going on for the future of healthcare and it’s a battle worth fighting. Thanks for the excellent work ZDoggMD! Shout out to HealthISPrimary.org as well. Check out the video below:

Theranos “Punks” the Scientific Community In First Public Presentation at AACC

Posted on August 2, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Elizabeth Holmes made her first public appearance at #AACC2016 where most thought that she would address the concerns (I’m being nice) around the Theranos products and practices. While most believed that Holmes would not go into much detail, I didn’t see anyone predict that she would not only avoid the controversy, but she also decided to launch a new product. I use the phrase “new product” lightly since it’s similar to lab equipment on the market today, but smaller.

I think this image and tweet describes most people’s reaction to this bait and switch by Theranos and Holmes:
Theranos Punks AACC in First Public Appearance

It’s too bad she chose not to address the controversy before trying to sell another product. Are there any labs out there that will buy this new product until they do address the controversy? I’d hope not. Theranos will have to address it, but for some reason they’re putting it off.

This tweets seems to have captured the sentiment that most will likely feel about any product that Theranos tries to deliver:

Do We Underestimate the Power of Smart Phones in Healthcare? – Fun Friday

Posted on July 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Smart phones have become a serious societal addiction. In some ways that is bad and no doubt there are plenty of studies that will come out about the negative impacts from cell phone addiction. However, the fact that people always have their cell phone is also a tremendous opportunity for healthcare to really engage their patient. This is what came to mind when I saw these funny cartoons about our addiction to our cell phones.

Cell Phone Addiction - Social Science Research Cartoon

Cell Phone Addiction Cartoon

Thanks Eric Topol for sharing these cartoons.

Lessons Learned from Practice Fusion’s FTC Charges and Settlement

Posted on July 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Almost 3 years ago I wrote an article about Practice Fusion violating some physicians’ trust in sending millions of emails to their patients. It’s still shocking to me to read through the physicians’ reaction to having emails unknowingly sent out in their name to their patients. I spent about a month researching that story. That’s longer than I’ve done for any other article by a significant margin. What I discovered was just that compelling.

When I first was told about the story, it seemed possible that each of those emails (we estimated 9 million) was a HIPAA violation. However, as we researched the story more and talked with multiple experts, it seemed like only a small subset could have possibly been considered a HIPAA violation. Practice Fusion had done a pretty reasonable job on the HIPAA front in our opinion. We all learned a lot about HIPAA and patient emails from the experience. Not to mention the importance of physician trust in your EHR product.

With that said, Forbes read my articles and decided to write an article that extended on the research that I’d done for the story along with a follow up article that looked at some of the things patients were posting publicly in these physician reviews. Forbes didn’t link to my article since I was pretty cautious with the whole thing after Practice Fusion had threatened sending their lawyers my way. I didn’t have a bevy of lawyers behind me like Forbes. Plus, some other crazy things happened like people trying to discredit me in the comments from the same IP address in San Francisco and a fabricated blog post to try and discredit what I’d written. Needless to say, it was quite the experience.

There were some people encouraging me to take it much further and to expose some of the crazy things that went down. That wasn’t my interest. I’d told an important story that needed to be told in what I believed was a fair an accurate way. I didn’t have any other goals despite some people insinuating that I might have other intentions.

Three years after I wrote that story it’s interesting to see that the FTC finally published the complaint against Practice Fusion (they also shared an analysis) and the Settlement agreement. I guess our government does work as slow as we all imagine.

I’m not going to dive into the details of the settlement here, but I did discuss the lessons we can learn from Practice Fusion’s FTC complaint and settlement with Shahid Shah and from our discussion I came up with these important lessons that apply to any company working in healthcare IT.

Healthcare Needs to Worry About More Than HIPAA and OCR
I think that many healthcare IT organizations only worried about HIPAA and OCR (which enforces HIPAA) when developing their products and implementing them in healthcare. This example clearly illustrates that the FTC is interested in what you do in healthcare and they’re not just going to defer to OCR to ensure that things are going right. This is particularly true as healthcare becomes more and more consumer oriented. This advice is also timely given ONC’s report to congress about health data oversight beyond HIPAA.

Healthcare Interoperability and Public Disclosure Might Be Worse
One challenge with the FTC settlement is that it could cause many other healthcare IT vendors to use it as an excuse not to take the next step in engaging patients, sharing health information where it’s needed, and other things that will help to improve healthcare. The fear of government condemnation could cause many to balk at progressive initiatives that would benefit patients.

While I do think healthcare IT companies should be cautious, fear of the FTC shouldn’t be used as an excuse to do nothing. The reality of the Practice Fusion case wasn’t that they shouldn’t have built the product they did, it was just that they needed to better communicate what they were doing to both doctors and patients. If they had done so I wouldn’t have had an article to write and the FTC wouldn’t have had any issue with what they were doing.

Communicate Properly to Patients
Reading the FTC claim was interesting to me. In the month I spent researching the story, I felt that Practice Fusion had done a great job in their privacy notice saying that the patient’s review would be posted publicly. It stated as much in their policy and I found no fault in their posting the patient reviews in public. That’s why I didn’t write about them in my articles. Certainly they could have made it more clear to patients, but I put the responsibility on the patient to read the privacy policy. If the patient chooses not to read the privacy policy when sharing really intimate personal details in an online form, then I don’t have much sympathy for them.

Of course, I’m not a lawyer and the FTC found very different. The FTC thought that the disclosure to the patient should have reached out and grabbed consumers and that the key facts shouldn’t be buried in a hard-to-understand privacy policy. A good lawyer can help an organization find the balance of effectively meeting the FTC requirements, but also not scaring patients away from participating. Although, it can certainly be a challenge.

If You Can Identify Private Information You Should
There are some obvious things that we all know shouldn’t be posted publicly. These days with technologies like NLP (natural language processing), you can identify many of these obvious pieces of private data and ensure they’re hidden and never go public. These technologies aren’t perfect, but having them in place will show that you’ve made a best effort to ensure that consumers health data is kept as private as possible.

Communicate Better with Doctors
This might be the biggest thing I learned from the experience. I find it interesting that the FTC complaint barely even talks about it (maybe it’s not under the FTC’s purview?). However, what came through loud and clear from this experience is that you need to effectively communicate what you’re doing to the doctor. This is particularly true if you’re doing something in the doctors name. If not, you’re going to lose the trust of doctors.

The FTC has a blog post up which has more lessons for those of us in the healthcare industry. They’re worthy of consideration if you’re a health IT company that’s working with patients (yes, that’s pretty much all of you).

P.S. I find it interesting that the Patient Fusion website still lists 30,061 doctors on patient fusion, 181,818 appointments today, 1,844718 reviews, and 98% doctors recommended. The same numbers that were listed back in 2013:

I guess that page isn’t a real time feed. I also looked at the Patient Fusion website today to see how they showed reviews now. I didn’t scour the whole website, but it appears that they now only show the quantitative review score and not the qualitative review.

Healthcare Scene Quotes

Posted on July 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

My kids are out of school and driving my wife nuts. You know the drill if you have children. Since I work at home, I’m fully aware of what’s going on with the kids during summer break and so I try and help my wife where I can. This summer I had a great idea. I’d put my kids to work!

My kids love computers and anything to do with technology and so I figured if they were going to spend so much time in front of a screen, then they should find something productive to do. With that idea, I grabbed a bunch of quotes from previous blog posts we’d done on Healthcare Scene and asked my kids to turn those quotes into social media images I could share online.

Well, it turns out that only my 12-year-old had enough knowledge to do the work. The younger kids still have quite a bit to learn. The only other problem is my 12-year-old son is colorblind. So, that does produce some interesting results.

Long story short, take a look at some of the Healthcare Scene quotes that my son made. Not bad for a first try. I mostly love that he’s learning something useful. Let me know what you think. Each image links to the original post if you want to read the context.
Andy Slavitt - Physician Data Paradox

If you want patients to be prepared to care for themselves, treat them like adults and include them in what you’re doing.

Your online searches say a lot about your health, both physical and mental

Anyone could be breached and HIPAA will only protect you so much

How many healthcare ideas have been shot down because

HIM professionals should continue to assist in the quest for interoperability and electronic data sharing at the notion of patie