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Securing Mobile Devices in Healthcare

Posted on February 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

When you look at healthcare security on the whole, I think everyone would agree that healthcare has a lot of work to do. Just taking into account the top 5 health data breaches in 2015, approximately 30-35% of people in the US have had their health data breached. I’m afraid that in 2016 these numbers are likely going to get worse. Let me explain why I think this is the case.

First, meaningful use required healthcare organizations to do a HIPAA risk assessment. While many organizations didn’t really do a high quality HIPAA risk assessment, it still motivated a number of organizations to do something about privacy and security. Even if it wasn’t the step forward many would like, it was still a step forward.

Now that meaningful use is being replaced, what other incentive are doctors going to have to take a serious look at privacy and security? If 1/3 of patients having their records breached in 2015 isn’t motivating enough, what’s going to change in 2016?

Second, hackers are realizing the value of health data and the ease with which they can breach health data systems. Plus, with so many organizations going online with their EHR software and other healthcare IT software, these are all new targets for hackers to attack.

Third, while every doctor in healthcare had a mobile device, not that many of them accessed their EHR on their mobile device since many EHR vendors didn’t support mobile devices very well. Over the next few years we’ll see EHR vendors finally produce high quality, native mobile apps that access EHR software. Once they do, not only will doctors be accessing patient data on their mobile device, but so will nurses, lab staff, HIM, etc. While all of this mobility is great, it creates a whole new set of vulnerabilities that can be exploited if not secured properly.

I’m not sure what we can do to make organizations care about privacy and security. Although, once a breach happens they start to care. We’re also not going to be able to stem the tide of hackers being interested in stealing health data. However, we can do something about securing the plethora of mobile devices in healthcare. In fact, it’s a travesty when we don’t since mobile device security has become so much easier.

I remember in the early days of smartphones, there weren’t very many great enterprise tools to secure your smartphones. These days there are a ton of great options and many of them come natively from the vendor who provides you the phone. Many are even integrated into the phone’s hardware as well as software. A good example of this is the mobile security platform, Samsung KNOX™. Take a look at some of its features:

  • Separate Work and Personal Data (Great for BYOD)
  • Multi-layered Hardware and Software Security
  • Easy Mobile Device Management Integration
  • Enterprise Grade Security and Encryption

It wasn’t that long ago that we had to kludge together multiple solutions to achieve all of these things. Now they come in one nice, easy to implement package. The excuses of why we don’t secure mobile devices in healthcare should disappear. If a breach occurs in your organization because a mobile device wasn’t secure, I assure you that those excuses will feel pretty hollow.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare

Making Precision Medicine a Reality with Dr. Delaney, SAP & Curtis Dudley, VP at Mercy

Posted on February 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live interview, you can watch the interview on YouTube below:

You can also watch the “after party” where Shahid Shah joins us and extends the discussion we started:

Making Precision Medicine a Reality-blog

Ever since President Obama announced the precision medicine initiative, it’s become a hot topic in every healthcare organization. While it’s great to talk theoretically about what’s happening with precision medicine, I’m always more interested with what’s actually happening to make medicine more precise. That’s why I’m excited to sit down with a great panel of experts that are actually working in the trenches where precision medicine is being implemented.

On Monday, February 8, 2016 at 2 PM ET (11 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with Curtis Dudley from Mercy and Dr. David Delaney from SAP where we’re going to dive into the work Curtis Dudley and his team are doing at Mercy around perioperative services analytics that improved quality outcomes and reduced delivery costs.

The great part is that you can join my live conversation with this panel of experts and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Monday, February 8, 2016 at 2 PM ET (11 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

Here are a few more details about our panelists:

If you can’t join our live video discussion or want to learn more, check out Mercy’s session at HIMSS16 called “HANA as the Key to Advanced Analytics for Population Health and Operational Performance” on March 1, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. at SAP Booth #5828.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Genomic Medicine

Posted on February 3, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last month I was lucky to lead a panel discussion on the topic of genomics in medicine at CES. I was joined on the panel by Andy De, Global Managing Director and General Manager for Healthcare and Life Sciences at Tableau, and Aaron Black, Director, Informatics, Inova Translational Medicine Institute. There certainly wasn’t enough time in our session to get to everything that was really happening in genomics, but Andy and Aaron do a great job giving you an idea of what’s really happening with genomics and the baseline of genomic data that’s being set for the future. You can see what I mean in the video below:

Be sure to see all of the conferences where you can find Healthcare Scene.

The Biggest Challenge in Healthcare: Excuses

Posted on January 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In one of my many conversations, someone told me the following quote that really stuck with me. I can’t remember who told me it and they didn’t want to be named, but I thought the comment was incredibly insightful.

The problem with healthcare is that it’s all complex. If people want to find an excuse not to do something, they can find one.

I think this quote is spot on. Is there anything in healthcare that isn’t complex? At least in healthcare technology, everything is complex. It’s not enough to just create a solution and roll it out tomorrow. You have to consider HIPAA laws, FDA regulations, reimbursement regulations, Federal laws, state laws, medical licensures, medical liability, etc etc etc.

Doctors principle of “first do no harm” is very real in healthcare and a generally good principle, but it can also be invoked easily to say no to anything you don’t want to do. Even if the thing that could be done doesn’t actually do any harm and could actually be beneficial to patients.

My prediction is the next 10 years, organizations are going to be defined by how an organization approaches this challenge. On the one hand we’ll have organizations that choose to use complexity as an excuse to not innovate. On the other hand we’ll have organizations that embrace hard, challenging, complex problems with solutions instead of excuses. It won’t be easy for these organizations, but it will absolutely differentiate them from their competitors.

I’m not suggesting that we should lower the standards of what’s acceptable to implement in healthcare. Instead, I’m suggesting that we make the effort required to explore new innovations and collaboratively work on solutions that handle the complexity of healthcare while providing incredible value to your organization and patients. After all, the very best things in life are challenging and difficult. Let’s embrace the challenging and difficult instead of using it as an excuse for inaction.

Healthcare Data Breach Deja Vu…More Like Groundhog Day

Posted on January 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I was intrigued by Ryan Witt’s comment about it being Deja Vu when it came to more healthcare data breaches. In many ways he’s right. Although, I’d almost compare it more to the movie Groundhog Day than deja vu. If it feels like we’ve been through this before it’s because we have been through it before. The iHealthBeat article he links to outlines a wide variety of healthcare breaches and the pace at which breaches are occurring is accelerating.

I think we know the standard script for when a breach occurs:

  1. Company discovers a breach has occurred (or often someone else discovers it and lets them know)
  2. Company announces that a “very highly sophisticated” breach occurred to their system. (Note: It’s never admitted that they did a poor job protecting their systems. It was always a sophisticated attack)
  3. Details of the breach are outlined along with a notice that all of their other systems are secure (How they know this 2nd part is another question)
  4. They announce that there was no evidence that the data was used inappropriately (As if they really know what happens with the data after it’s breached)
  5. All parties that were impacted by the breach will be notified (Keeping the US postal service in business)
  6. Credit monitoring is offered to all individuals affected by the breach (Makes you want to be a credit monitoring company doesn’t it?)
  7. Everything possible is being done to ensure that a breach like this never happens again (They might need to look up the term “everything” in Webster’s dictionary)

It’s a pretty simple 7 step process, no? Have we seen this before? Absolutely! Will we see it again? Far too much.

Of course, the above just covers the public facing component of a breach. The experience is much more brutal if you’re an organization that experiences a breach of your data. What do they say? An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. That’s never more appropriate than in healthcare security and privacy. Unfortunately, far too many are living in an “ignorance is bliss” state right now. What they don’t tell you is that ignorance is not bliss if you get caught in your ignorance.

What’s Happening at MEDITECH w/ Helen Waters, VP @MEDITECH

Posted on January 25, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: Here’s the video recording of my interview with Helen Waters from MEDITECH

MEDITECH - Helen Waters

Many in the large hospital EHR space have argued that it’s a two horse race between Cerner and Epic. However, many forget how many users MEDITEH still has using its healthcare IT products. Not to mention MEDITECH was originally founded in 1969 and has a rich history working in the space. On Friday, January 29, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT), I’ll be sitting down with Helen Waters, VP at MEDITECH to talk about the what’s happening with MEDITECH and where MEDITECH fits into the healthcare IT ecosystem.

You can join my live conversation with Helen Waters and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask Helen questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Friday, January 29, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

We’re interested to hear Helen’s comments about the culture and history of MEDITECH along with what MEDITECH’s doing with its products to change perceptions and misconceptions around the MEDITECH product. We’ll also be sure to ask Helen about important topics like interoperability and physician dissatisfaction (“Too Many Clicks!”). We hope you’ll join us to learn more about what’s happening with MEDITECH.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Personalized Medicine Gone Wrong

Posted on January 22, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Personalized Care in a Digital World

Nothing like a cartoon to use humor to illustrate a really important point. We have to be careful that personalized medicine doesn’t make medicine less personal. Also, a great reminder that technology should assist the doctor and not replace it. Technology doesn’t have common sense.

7th Annual New Media Meetup at #HIMSS16 Sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions

Posted on January 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

7th Annual New Media Meetup - HIMSS16 in Chicago

For those of you planning to attend the HIMSS 2016 conference in Las Vegas, I’m excited to share the details of the 7th Annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS. For those who’ve missed the last 6 events, it’s a unique event that brings together healthcare IT bloggers, tweeters, and other social media influencers at the mecca of Healthcare IT conferences.

It’s incredible to think that this will be our 7th year hosting the New Media Meetup during HIMSS. Since HIMSS 2016 is returning to my hometown of Las Vegas, I knew we had to set a new bar for the event. Luckily our sponsor, Stericycle Communication Solutions, was on board with my ambitious plans. I hope everyone will spend some time checking out Stericycle Communication Solutions and thank them for sponsoring the event.

Here’s a quick summary of what we have planned for the event:
When: Wednesday 3/2 6:00-8:00 PM (Unofficial Karaoke after party starts at 8)
Where: Gilley’s at Treasure Island Casino – 3300 S Las Vegas Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89109 MAP (Treasure Island is a short walk across the street from the Venetian/Sands)
Who: Anyone who uses or is interested in New Media (Blogs, Twitter, Social Media, Periscope, Blab, etc)
What: Food, Drinks, Mechanical Bull, Dance Floor, Giveaways, and Amazing People

Register Here!

Note: We have limited space for the event and so like in past years, we’ll have to close registration once we reach capacity.

Sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions
SRCL Communication Solutions
Stericycle Communication Solutions helps bring patients and healthcare organizations closer together. We believe that the key to patient engagement and positive patient experiences is effective and timely communication.

Stericycle Communication Solutions offer a unique combination of Live Agent services and Technology products that allow patients and providers to interact through multiple communication channels: phone, email, voice, text and online. We provide scheduling (phone and online self-serve), physician referral, population health, payment, follow-up, after-hours answering, care coordination and appointment reminder solutions to over 27,000 organizations.

Learn more at www.stericyclecommunications.com

Those interested in the New Media Meetup at HIMSS will want to check out the full scale Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference that we’re hosting in Atlanta April 6-8, 2016. It’s a special 3 days devoted to health IT marketing and PR professionals.

A really big thank you also goes out to all the members of Influential Networks and Healthcare Scene that help promote the New Media Meetup. This event was originally brought together through social media and is still largely organized thanks to social media.

Let me know if you have any questions and I look forward to seeing many of you in Las Vegas very soon!

7th Annual New Media Meetup - HIMSS16 in Las Vegas

How Tech Companies are Changing Our Healthcare Infographic

Posted on January 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UIC’s Masters in Health Informatics has put out a great infographic that looks at how tech companies are changing our healthcare system. However, what struck me most about the infographic was that it focuses on how medicine is going to become (some might say becoming) far more personalized. I’ve always been struck by the fact that many of the advancements in healthcare that we dream about are only possible through the use of technology. Many of the personalize medicine initiatives aren’t even in the realm of thinking in a paper world. That’s a powerful idea.

I’m sure that many out there might read this and argue that the addition of computers is causing a de-personalization of health care. I’d argue that it all depends on how the tech is implemented. In many cases today, healthcare technology has de-personalized the care that’s provided. However, that doesn’t have to be the case. Technology should be a tool that makes the care a doctor provides extremely personalized. That’s true from a data and patient-physician interaction perspective.

Take a look at the infographic and be sure to share your thoughts in the comments:
How Tech Companies are Changing our Healthcare Infographic

Virtual Reality in Healthcare

Posted on January 18, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

David Chou has an interesting post up over at the Healthcare Standards blog that talks about virtual reality (VR) and where we’ll see it in healthcare. He posits the following 3 areas of healthcare where the healthcare industry can benefit:

  1. Training
  2. Diagnosis
  3. Treatment

I can’t argue with David’s assessment of how virtual reality solutions will be used in healthcare. I think the most promising of these is likely in the medical training area. However, there are no doubt going to be some great treatment options that use VR as well.

The problem with virtual reality in healthcare is that none of the virtual reality companies are going to focus any of their effort on healthcare. Everyone that I talked to at CES (see all our coverage of Digital Health at CES) made it very clear that VR technology was going to start with gaming and video. That opportunity is so large that they don’t have any time or need to go after other markets.

This isn’t to say that virtual reality won’t be used in healthcare. What I’m saying is that virtual reality vendors aren’t going to be doing things to make it easy for healthcare to adopt their technologies. Innovators that want to use virtual reality in healthcare are going to have to take and adapt what’s built for other industries and apply it to healthcare.

Here’s a simple example. I saw an amazing number of 360 degree camera options that are paired with virtual reality. You literally can turn around and see what’s happening all around you as if you were standing in a room. It’s quite amazing technology (although there was some digital stiching that still needs to be improved) and you could see some application of the technology in healthcare. The problem is that it’s unlikely that this video technology is going to be HIPAA compliant by default. Let’s not even talk about these vendors signing a HIPAA business associate agreement.

This example is why I think the medical training aspect of virtual reality is so promising. It’s not governed by HIPAA and so the technology doesn’t have to worry about those requirements and regulations. The same is true for treatment. The problem there is that for it to truly be classified as a treatment, it’s going to have to go through FDA testing and/or clinical trials. The pace of change is moving so fast with virtual reality technology that by the time you finished a clinical trial or became FDA cleared the old virtual reality technology you used will be considered legacy software and hardware.

With all of this said, I had a chance to try out the next generation Oculus Riftat the Dell venue and it was an extraordinary experience. I got lost in the virtual world (I was playing a simple video game) and completely forgot that I was in a noisy bar. I’m excited to see all of the places virtual reality will pop up. That includes in healthcare.