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Secure Text Messaging is Univerally Needed in Healthcare

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I’ve written regularly about the need for secure text messaging in healthcare. I can’t believe that it was two years ago that I wrote that Texting is Not HIPAA Secure. Traditional SMS texting on your cell phone is not HIPAA secure, but there are a whole lot of alternatives. In fact, in January I made the case for why even without HIPAA Secure Text Messaging was a much better alternative to SMS.

Those that know me (or read my byline at the end of each article) know that I’m totally bias on this front since I’m an adviser to secure text message company, docBeat. With that disclaimer, I encourage all of you to take a frank and objective look at the potential for HIPAA violations and the potential benefits of secure text over SMS and decide for yourself if there is value in these secure messaging services. This amazing potential is why I chose to support docBeat in the first place.

While I’ve found the secure messaging space really interesting, what I didn’t realize when I started helping docBeat was how many parts of the healthcare system could benefit from something as simple as a secure text message. When we first started talking about the secure text, we were completely focused on providers texting in ambulatory practices and hospitals. We quickly realized the value of secure texting with other members of the clinic or hospital organization like nurses, front desk staff, HIM, etc.

What’s been interesting in the evolution of docBeat was how many other parts of the healthcare system could benefit from a simple secure text message solution. Some of these areas include things like: long term care facilities, skilled nursing facilities, Quick Care, EDs, Radiology, Labs, rehabilitation centers, surgery centers, and more. This shouldn’t have been a surprise since the need to communicate healthcare information that includes PHI is universal and a simple text message is often the best way to do it.

The natural next extension for secure messaging is to connect it to patients. The beautiful part of secure text messaging apps like docBeat is that patients aren’t intimidated by a the messages they receive from docBeat. The same can’t be said for most patient portals which require all sorts of registration, logins, forms, etc. Every patient I know is happy to read a secure text message. I don’t know many that want to login to a portal.

Over the past couple years the secure text messaging tide has absolutely shifted and there’s now a land grab for organizations looking to implement some form of secure text messaging. In some ways it reminds me of the way organizations were adopting EHR software a few years back. However, we won’t need $36 billion to incentivize the adoption of secure text message. Instead, market pressures will make it happen naturally. Plus, with ICD-10 delayed another year, hopefully organizations will have time to focus on small but valuable projects like secure text messaging.

April 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Taking a Second Look: Accessing Your Data beyond the PM or EMR

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Editor’s Note: The following is an update to a previous EMR and HIPAA blog post titled “EMR Companies Holding Practice Data for “Ransom”.” In this update, James Summerlin (aka “JamesNT”) offers an update on EHR vendors willingness to let providers access their EHR data.

Over the years I have been approached with questions by several solo docs and medical groups about things such as the following:

  • Migrating to a different PM or EMR system.
  • Merging PM’s or EMR’s such as when a practice buys out another practice.
  • Interfacing the EMR and PM.
  • Custom reports.
  • More custom reports.
  • LOTS MORE CUSTOM REPORTS!!!

And there have been plenty of times I’ve had to give answers to those questions that were not favorable.  In many cases, it was with some online EMR or PM and the fact that I could not get to the database and the vendor refused to export a copy to me or the vendor wanted thousands of dollars for the export.  With the on-premises PM and EMR systems, getting to the data was a matter of working my way around whatever database was being used and figuring out what table had what data.  Although working with an on-premises PM or EMR may sound easier, it too often isn’t.  The on-premises guys have some tricks up their sleeves to keep you away from your data such as password protecting the database and, in some cases, flat out threatening legal action.

A few years back, I wrote a post on a forum about my thoughts on how once you entered your data into a PM or EMR, you may never get it back.  You can see John Lynn’s blog post on that here.

My being critical of EMR and PM software vendors is nothing new.  I’ve written several posts on forums and blogs, even articles in BC Advantage Magazine, about how hard it can be to deal with various EMR and PM systems.  Much of the, at times, downright contemptuous attitudes many PM and EMR vendors have towards their own clients can be very harmful.  Let’s consider three aspects:

  • Customization.  Most of the PM/EMR vendors out there would love to charge mega-bucks to write custom reports and so forth for clients.  However, this isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.  First, most clients simply aren’t going to pay the kind of money many PM or EMR companies want to charge.  Second, custom reports have to be maintained.  Eventually, you have all these clients running around needing changes to their reports and the PM or EMR vendor simply can’t get to them all in a timely manner without hiring lots of technical (read: EXPENSIVE) staff which turns what was once a money-making ordeal into a money losing one.  And, of course, the client’s suffer since they can’t fine-tune their practice to the degree needed in today’s challenging economy.
  • Interfacing.  What happens if a client wants to interface encounters and demographics from their EMR to their PM system and then interface dollar amounts and so forth from the PM system with receivables and expenditures in Quickbooks or other financial software into a series of reports that give a total view of how the practice is doing?  We are talking about the ability to, day-by-day, forecast incoming receivables from carriers and patient payments (within certain limits, of course), with expected expenditures (payroll, taxes, etc.) from the accounting software to get a financial outlook for the practice for the next few weeks or even months for long-term planning.  A PM or EMR vendor, already dealing with HIPAA or meaningful use, may not want to get involved in that kind of hard-core number crunching, yet the practice is demanding it.
  • A second part to interfacing.  Getting the EMR and PM vendors to get along.  Often what you see is the EMR vendor has a certain way they do an HL7 interface and the PM vendor has a certain way they do an HL7 interface and if they don’t line up properly, you’re just out of luck.  Either it works with reduced functionality or it doesn’t work at all and neither vendor will budge to change anything.  And that’s assuming they both use HL7!

In situations like those above, the best way to resolution is for the practice to perhaps obtain its own technical talent and build its own tools to extend the capabilities of the data contained within the various databases and repositories it may have such as the databases of the PM and EMR.  Unfortunately, as I have reported before, most PM and EMR systems lock up the practice’s data such that it is unobtainable.

At long last; however, there appears to be a light at the end of the tunnel that doesn’t sound like a train.  Some of the EMR systems that doctors use are beginning to realize that creating a turtle shell around a client’s data, in the long run, doesn’t do the client nor the PM/EMR vendor any good.  One such EMR I’ve been working with for a long time is Amazing Charts.  Amazing Charts has found itself in a very unique situation in that many of its clients are actually quite technical themselves or have no problem obtaining the technical talent they need to bend the different systems in their practices to their will.  The idea of having three or four databases, each being an island unto itself, is not acceptable to this adventurous lot.  They want all this data pooled together so they can make real business decisions.

Amazing Charts; therefore, has decided to be more open regarding data access.  Read only access to the Amazing Charts database is soon to be considered a given by the company itself.  Write access, of course, is another matter.  Clients will have to prove, and rightly so, that they won’t go spelunking through the database making changes that do little more than rack up tech-support calls.  Even with the caution placed on write access this is a far jump above and beyond the flat out “NO” any other company will give you for access to their database.  I consider this to be a great leap forward for Amazing Charts and, I’m certain, will set them apart from competition that still considers lock-in and a stand-offish attitude the way to treat clients who pay them a lot of money.

Perhaps one day other PM and EMR vendors will see the light and realize the data belongs to the practice, not the vendor, and will stop taking people’s stuff only to rent access to it back to them or withhold it altogether.  Until then, Amazing Charts seems to be leading the way.

April 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

You might be an #HITNerd If…

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You might be an #HITNerd If…

you can’t write your middle name in cursive, but you can touch type.

Find all our #HITNerd references on: EMR and EHR & EMR and HIPAA.

NEW: Check out the #HITNerd store to purchase an #HITNerd t-shirt of cell phone case.

Note: Much like Jeff Foxworthy is a redneck. I’m well aware that I’m an #HITNerd.

April 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Lack of 2014 Certified EHRs

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I was asked recently by an EHR vendor about the disconnect between the number of 2011 Certified EHR and the number of 2014 Certified EHR. I haven’t looked through the ONC-CHPL site recently, but you can easily run the number of certified EHR vendors there. Of course, there’s a major difference in the number of 2011 certified EHR versus 2014 certified EHR. However, I don’t think it’s for the reason most people give.

Every EHR vendor that gets 2014 Certified likes to proclaim that they’re one of the few EHR vendors that was “able” to get 2014 Certified. They like to point to the vast number of EHR that haven’t bridged from being 2011 Certified to being 2014 Certified as a sign that their company is special because they were able to complete the “more advanced” certification. While no one would argue that the 2014 Certification takes a lot more work, I think it’s misleading for EHR companies to proclaim themselves victor because they’re “one of the few” EHR vendors to be 2014 Certified.

First of all, there are over 1000 2014 Certified EHR products on ONC-CPHL as of today and hundreds of them (223 to be exact – 29 inpatient and 194 ambulatory) are even certified as complete EHR. Plus, I’ve heard from EHR vendors and certifying bodies that there’s often a delay in ONC putting the certified EHR up on ONC-CPHL. So, how many more are 2014 Certified that aren’t on the list…yet.

Another issue with this number is that there is still time for EHR vendors to finish their 2014 EHR certification. Yes, we’re getting close, but no doubt we’ll see a wave of last minute EHR certifications from EHR vendors. It’s kind of like many of you reading this that are sitting on your taxes and we’ll have a rush of tax filings in the next few days. It’s not a perfect comparison since EHR certification is more complex and there are a limited number of EHR Certification slots from the ONC-ATCB’s, but be sure there are some waiting until the last minute.

It’s also worth considering that I saw one report that talked about the hundreds (or it might have been thousands) of 2011 Certified EHR that never actually had any doctors attest using their software. If none of your users actually attested using your EHR software, then would it make any business sense to go after the 2014 EHR certification? We can be sure those will drop out, but I expect that a large majority of these aren’t really “EHR” software in the true sense. They’re likely modularly certified and add-ons to EHR software.

To date, I only know of one EHR software that’s comes out and shunned 2014 Certified EHR status. I’m sure we’ll see more than just this one before the deadline, but my guess is that 90% of the market (ie. actual EHR users) already have 2014 Certified EHR software available to them and 99% of the market will have 2014 certified EHR available if they want by the deadline.

I don’t think 2014 EHR certification is going to be a differentiating factor for any of the major EHR players. All the major players realize that being 2014 Certified is essential to their livelihood and a cost of doing business.

Of course, the same can’t be said for doctors. There are plenty of ways for doctors to stay in business while shunning 2014 Certified EHR software and meaningful use stage 2. I’m still really interested to see how that plays out.

April 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

EHR Adoption Failure Is Not Always a Technology Failure

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In one of the LinkedIn threads I was participating, Cameron Collette offered this really interesting insight:

Secondly, there is a general unwillingness to change current work flow models in many health care facilities. Daily I hear, “we have never done it that way” or “that’s not the way do things”. So, we have what is currently a greater than 40% EMR adoption failure rate. In other words, it is not always a technology failure. The technology might work, but in order to make it work properly requires a significant change in processes. Sometimes this would be a good thing. Sometimes it would not be a good thing as a lot of EMR/EHR designs were developed with virtually no real input from the people that have to work with them every day.

He’s absolutely right. It is very often the case that the problem with your EHR has nothing to do with the EHR technology at all. Often, one of the biggest problems that’s faced during an EHR implementation is a change to culture.

I’ve said multiple times that an EHR implementation requires change. I know that many EHR companies will try and sell you that their product can be implemented with no change to your workflow. That’s just an outright lie. Sure, some of them can do a pretty good job modeling your current workflow in the EHR, but there is still plenty of change that’s required.

Change and EHR implementation go together. Organizations that deny this reality have issues in their EHR implementation.

This is why every EHR implementation I’ve seen has required some powerful leadership that drives the initiative. It’s why the $36+ billion in stimulus money has driven EHR adoption so much. That money makes leaders respond.

My best advice for healthcare leaders out there is to embrace the change that EHR and other technology is bringing. You shouldn’t accept mediocrity in a tech system, but you should expect and be ready to change when you implement an EHR. In fact, one of the best assets you can build into your company is the ability to adapt to change.

5 years from now, I’m pretty sure we’re going to look back and think that the next 5 years of technology caused more change for good than we’ve seen in the last 10 years. If your organization doesn’t have a culture of adapting to change, they’re going to be left behind.

April 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Healthcare CIO Mindmap

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During HIMSS, Citius Tech put out this great image they called the Healthcare CIO Mindmap. It’s a beautiful display of everything that’s happening in healthcare IT. Although, it’s also an illustration of the challenge we and hospital CIOs face. Is it any wonder that so many hospital CIOs feel overwhelmed?

Enjoy the Healthcare CIO Mindmap in all its glory below (Hint: Click on the image to see the full graphic):
Healthcare CIO Mindmap

I think that image is enough for anyone to chew on for one day. I’d love to hear your thoughts on it.

April 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Hospital Intern Time, Why ICD10?, and EHR Satisfaction Pre-MU

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Everyone that reads this immediately thinks that this is a terrible thing. It seems ghastly that a doctor that’s paid to treat patients would spend so much time with an EMR vs with patients. I agree with everyone that are highest paid resource should be using as much time as possible with and treating patients. However, this study would have a lot more meaning if it was paired with a previous study that showed how much time a hospital intern spent in a paper chart. Maybe they spent 400% more time with a paper chart than direct patient contact. Then, this stat would come off looking very different. You have to always remember that you have to take into account the previous status quo.


This article and the discussion around ICD-10 was phenomenal. Passionate viewpoints on each side. It fleshed out both sides of the arguments for me really well. Too bad no one will care too much for a while.


Oh…the good old days. When everyone love EHR, because they chose to do it and so they made the most of their choice. Ok, I’m being a little facetious, but I seem to remember a study I saw that showed how much more unsatisfied doctors are with EHR today versus pre-MU. I imagine it’s not all MU’s fault, but it certainly hasn’t helped with physician EHR satisfaction.

April 6, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Will This Happen in Healthcare?

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I’ll admit that I’m a bit of a nerd (maybe even more than a bit) and I really enjoy reading venture capitalist blogs. One of my favorite reads is Fred Wilson. He posts something every day and he provides some amazing perspective on a lot of things. In a blog post a couple months back he posted the following quote, “programming these days is more about searching than anything else.”

For those of you who are not programmers in the room, you might be wondering how this applies to healthcare. Plus, you might be wondering if this statement is true. I assure you that it is true. The reason it’s true is three fold. First, the speed at which programming evolves is so quick that you have to be good at searching for the latest answer to your question. Second, the resources that are available online to answer those questions are phenomenal. You just have to know the right place to look. The amount of information you have to know to program is so great these days that it’s impossible for you to remember everything.

In many ways, all of these evolutions are a really great thing. As one tech friend of mine told me, “I realized pretty quickly that everything my company needs to know is already out there online. The value I bring is finding that information for them.”

I ask you then, “Will this happen in healthcare?”

I’d like to suggest that it’s already started to happen. I’ll never forget the doctor who visited my blog and commented that “the body of medical knowledge is so vast and complex that it’s impossible for the human mind to process it all.” Doesn’t that sound a lot like what I described above. The amount of medical knowledge and the speed at which it changes is impossible for someone to know and connect.

Is it possible that a future doctor will be better at searching for medical knowledge than they are at knowing that information off the top of their head? I think the answer is that they’ll have to be.

Don’t misunderstand me. Providers will still need an amazing baseline of information to be able to search and filter through the vast amount of data. However, they’ll likely remember where to find the answers versus knowing the answer off hand. Plus, their education and training will give them a baseline for understanding the data that they find. This is much the same as the programmer who know the basics, but learns more by searching and finding more information. The technology in this case doesn’t replace the person, but makes the person better.

I also feel the need to note that this won’t preclude other skills like empathy that are so important to the patient-provider relationship. You can’t use a tech search to help you show empathy to someone who’s just miscarried. Those skills will still be needed as much as ever. However, when it comes to medical knowledge I won’t be surprised if it becomes more about searching than anything else.

April 4, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Live Stream of Health IT Marketing and PR Conference and Free Guitar Giveaway

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Next week (April 7-8) the inaugural Health IT Marketing and PR Conference is happening in Las Vegas. As most of you know, I’ve worked really hard to make this a great event for everyone involved. A look at the final agenda for the conference should give you an idea of how great this event is going to be.

Free Live Stream
For those of you who weren’t able to make it to Las Vegas for the event, we’ve put together a free live stream of the conference. All you need to do is go to that page and register. Then, we’ll email you the details you’ll need to access the live stream. We appreciate Health Innovation Media and Supernap which provided the technology and support needed to make the live stream available for FREE.

Guitar Giveaway
One of the speakers has also put together a great free guitar giveaway for those attending the conference or watching from home. Chris O’Neal from peer60 and formerly of KLAS will be giving a presentation on How to Influence Ratings, Marketing Research, and Analyst Firms from 9:30-10:30 a.m. PT on Monday, April 7 of the conference. To enter, tweet how many minutes and seconds into his speech Chris will repeat the famous Rolling Stones song title, “I can’t get no satisfaction.” Be sure to mention @peer_60 and include the hashtags #HITmc and #guitargiveaway.

Here’s a simple link that will prime your tweet with everything you need to enter except the guess itself. Check out the peer60 blog post which has all the details, rules, and a picture of the guitar they’re giving away.

The official hashtag for the conference is: #HITMC. Following and participating in the conversation is a great way to see what’s happening at the conference and to connect with those interested in this event. We look forward to seeing you online and many of you in Las Vegas.

Don’t forget to register for the live stream.

April 3, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

New Reality TV Show to Follow ONC Leadership

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The past six months have been really amazing here at Healthcare Scene. In October, we acquired Healthcare IT Central and associated health IT career resources and next week we’ll be hosting the first ever Health IT Marketing and PR Conference. While these are two major milestones for Healthcare Scene, we’re not stopping there. We have ambitious plans to really bring healthcare IT to the masses.

What many people who read this site don’t know is that along with my healthcare IT blog network, I also have a reality TV blog network that covers TV shows like Dancing with the Stars, So You Think You Can Dance, and America’s Got Talent to name a few. Considering my passion for both healthcare IT and reality TV, I figured it would only be a matter of time until those two passions would be brought together.

I’m really excited to announce that I’ll be the Executive Producer of a new Health IT reality TV show that covers the inner workings of healthcare IT from the perspective of those working at ONC. Where possible, cameras will be following around the ONC leadership providing people an insight into things like meaningful use, RECs, ACOs, and ICD-10. The working name for the show is, “Under the Covers with ONC.” We start taping next week.

I want to applaud new ONC head, Karen DeSalvo, for really taking health IT to the next level with this show. It’s about time those people working so hard on something as important as health IT finally get some recognition. What better way to do this than to do a reality TV show?

Imagine how exciting it will be to see video of Karen DeSalvo tweeting “Call into the #HIT Standards Committee’s virtual meeting here: 1-877-705-6006.” Imagine how you’d feel watching the TV show if you were on the same call. You could say you were there. I wish we’d been filming when Karen DeSalvo Retweeted, “Hey, Tweeps, thanks for reading our workforce blog post. We have had more than 1090 readers so far!” Can you imagine the excitement of the moment? Now we’ll be able to share those type of moments with everyone.

Doug Fridsma, Chief Science Officer at ONC, commented on the show, “I can’t wait for people to finally see me get down and roll around with those healthcare standards. Who wouldn’t want to watch me work through the S&I framework?”

Some people have expressed concern that we won’t be covering their favorite government health IT project. To those people I say, go and create your own reality TV show. If I can do it, you can too. You may start by reaching out to Kathleen Sebelius who is supportive of this project but noted, “Good things the cameras weren’t rolling when we heard that Congress had slipped another ICD-10 delay into the SGR bill.” I think secretly, Sebelius is just jealous that Obama didn’t invite her to take part in his Between Two Ferns interview.

We reached out to Farzad Mostashari, Former ONC National Coordinator, to get his thoughts on the new ONC reality TV show. He replied, “I’ve been preaching for years that my hard working colleagues at ONC deserved more credit for the work they do. I just hope the show doesn’t get caught up in the petty discussions over whether it should have been blue button or purple button and instead focuses on things of substance like whether ICD-10, MU, etc are the ‘perfect storm’ of regulation or if it was more like a perfect earthquake.” I think we can all agree that it’s unfortunate we didn’t get this in place while Farzad was coordinator. His bow tie would have looked so great on camera.

We’ll be holding a special screening of the TV show at Health Datapalooza in June. I can already feel the energy and excitement of that screening with so many HIT Nerds present to see health IT reality TV. We’ll have a special area at the event where you can take a selfie with all your favorite ONC health IT heroes. Just get in line early. I’m pretty sure the Farzad line is going to be long. Can you imagine how many retweets you’d get if you got a selfie with two ONC Coordinators at once? I can’t wait to see you there.

UPDATE: For those who didn’t notice, this was an April Fool’s joke. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did.

April 1, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.