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Happy Memorial Day!

Posted on May 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In the US, today is Memorial Day. It’s a bit ironic that I’m writing about Memorial Day in the US while I’m teaching an EHR workshop in Dubai. While I love international travel, experiencing other cultures and meeting people with different perspectives, the travel also reminds me how lucky I am to live where I live and do what I do. There are a lot of amazing people who have lost their lives in order for that to be possible for me. I’m thinking about that this Memorial Day.

This never hit home more to me than when I saw this Memorial Day post by Dr. Nick. It included the following image:
Memorial Day Image

I’ll admit that the image is a bit shocking and heart wrenching for me to look at. Although, I’m not sure that’s such a bad thing. It’s important to remember the amazing warriors who have fought for our freedom throughout the years. Happy Memorial Day everyone!

EHR Partner Programs

Posted on May 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Amazing Charts just announced a new EHR partner program. This isn’t something that’s particularly new for EHR vendors. They all have lots of partners. Some have formalized them into a program like athenahealth has done with their More Disruption Please (MDP) program. Others are much more quiet about the partners they work with and how they work with them.

What’s clear to me in the EHR industry is that an EHR vendor won’t be able to do everything. There are some that like to try (See Epic), but even the largest EHR vendor isn’t going to be able to provide all the services that are needed by a healthcare organization. This is true for ambulatory and hospitals.

Since an EHR vendor won’t be able to do everything, it makes a lot of sense for an EHR vendor to have some sort of partners program. The challenge for an EHR vendor is that a partner program comes with two major expectations. First, the partner has a high quality integration with the EHR software. Second, that the partner is something that the EHR vendor has vetted.

The first challenge is mostly a challenge because most EHR vendors aren’t great at integrating with outside companies. This is a major culture shift for many EHR vendors and it will take time for them to get up to speed on these types of integrations. Plus, these integrations do take some time and investment on the part of the EHR vendor. When there’s time and investment involved, the EHR vendor starts to be much more selective about which companies they want to be working with long term. They don’t want to spend their time and money integrating with a company which none of its users will actually use.

The second challenge is that EHR users assume that an EHR partner is one that’s been vetted by the EHR vendor. Even if the EHR vendor puts all sorts of disclaimers on their partner page, the EHR vendor is still associated with their partners. The written disclaimers might help you avoid legal issues, but working with shady partners can do a lot of damage to your reputation and credibility in the marketplace. I actually think this is probably the biggest reason that EHR vendors have been reluctant to implement partner programs.

I think over time we’ll see the first problem solved as EHR vendors work to standardize their APIs for partner companies. As those APIs become more mature, we’ll see much deeper EHR integrations and the costs to an EHR vendor will drop dramatically when it comes to new partner integrations.

The second problem is much harder to solve. My best suggestion for EHR vendors is to create a platform which allows your users to help you vet potential partners. Not only can they participate in the vetting process, but it can also help you know which partners would be useful to your users. Is there anything more valuable than user driven partnerships? It also puts you in a good position with potential partners if you already have users interested in the integration.

However, an EHR vendor shouldn’t just leave potential partnership requests to their users. Many of their users don’t know of all the potential partner companies. Users are so busy dealing with their day jobs that they often don’t know of all the potential companies that could benefit their practice or hospital. Certainly you should accept user input on potential partnerships, but an EHR vendor should also seed the potential partner feedback platform with a list of potential partners as well. The mix of an EHR vendor created list together with user generated partner lists is much more powerful than one or the other.

We’re just at the beginning of companies partnering and integrating with EHR vendors. I expect that over the next 5 years an EHR vendor will be defined as much by the organizations it chooses to partner with as the features and functions it chooses to develop itself.

What’s the Story on 21st Century Cures Legislation?

Posted on May 21, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I just saw that the 21st Century Cures legislation passed the house committee process. Word on the street is that Congress probably won’t take this up even if the house passes it this summer. The legislation looks pretty interesting for those of us in healthcare IT. Blair Childs, Premier’s senior vice president of public affairs, offered the following statement on the legislation:

Members of Premier wish to thank House Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI) and Representative Diana Degette (D-CO) for their leadership to advance interoperability standards as part of the landmark 21st Century Cures legislation. With today’s vote, the vision for a fully interoperable health information technology ecosystem is one step closer to becoming a reality.

We also wish to thank Committee members Joe Pitts (R-PA), Frank Pallone (D-NJ), Gene Green (D- TX), Michael Burgess (R-TX) and Doris Matsui (D-CA) for their support of interoperability standards in the legislation, and for their efforts to ensure that the technology systems of the future will be built using open source codes that enable applications to seamlessly exchange data/information across disparate systems in healthcare.

Today’s vote is an essential step to optimize HIT investments, improve the quality of care across settings and avoid the cost burdens associated with the work around solutions that are needed today for systems to “talk” to one another. We strongly urge the full House of Representatives to support these interoperability standards and to vote in favor of moving the legislation forward as it stands today.

Many of the comments he offers about ensuring interoperability is open source and support for standards of healthcare interoperability are great things. Although, as I think we learned with the meaningful use regulations, the devil is in the details and the 21st Centure Cures legislation is not simple. I’d love to hear from people who are following the legislation. Is this a good piece of legislation? Should it be passed? Are their hidden land mines? What are the unknowns or uncertain outcomes of the legislation?

When I saw this legislation hit my email inbox it has me asking how people keep up with legislation. Not to mention, what’s the process for creating this legislation? Just thinking of the process makes me tired and overwhelmed. Is it any wonder that lobbyists are so powerful? It really takes someone whose full time job it is to track and influence legislation to really get something done. The process and legislation is so complex that a casual follower just can’t keep up. I think that’s really unfortunate. I’m not sure the solution though either.

How Will Patients Choose Healthcare?

Posted on May 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent conversation with Medhost CEO, Bill Anderson, he asked the question that’s the title of this blog post: “How Will Patients Choose Healthcare?” He then proceeded to answer his question by saying, “Healthcare will buy on brand like they do in their other purchasing decisions.” It’s worth adding that Bill and Medhost are working to build their YourCare Everywhere brand in healthcare. You can decide if their business efforts are skewing his perspective or not.

For me, I find the question absolutely fascinating and an extremely important question for healthcare organizations. This question is becoming more and more important since the shift to high deductible plans is forcing patients to be more selective in how they choose their healthcare provider. Will brand be the way that people choose healthcare?

One challenge I have with this idea is that healthcare is a complex decision. I don’t know many people who make impulse healthcare provider decisions. I wonder if there are other complex decisions we could learn from. What is true is that healthcare decisions are often crisis decisions. In a crisis, where do people turn? I think the answer is the brands they know.

As I look at healthcare, which organizations have a true national healthcare brand? The first one that comes to mind is Mayo Clinic. Cleveland Clinic seems to be working down a similar path. Are their others? There are very few national healthcare brands that are trusted.

There are many local healthcare brands. Dignity Health has been pouring money into commercials in Vegas to build their brand. I assure you the commercials are all brand. Intermountain has a brand in Utah and Partners Healthcare has a brand in Boston. We could argue whether they have good or bad brands since they are both so dominant in their region. There are many other examples of local healthcare brands.

On the other side of healthcare brands is the CVS Minute Clinic, Walmart, and all the other retailers trying to make a space for themselves in healthcare. Also competing for brand recognition with a similar direct to consumer, retail healthcare play are the telemedicine providers like MD Live.

Long story short, we’re seeing patients having more power when it comes to selecting their healthcare provider and we see a ton of brand competition. Will a healthcare organization be able to survive without a major investment in their brand? What does this mean for small physician practices?

I’d love to hear your thoughts about what’s happening with healthcare brands. Do they matter? In what ways will they matter? What should a healthcare organization be doing to shore up its brand?

Hospital EHR Adoption Chart

Posted on May 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I always love a good chart and this one illustrates what those of us in the industry have know for a while. EHR incentive money absolutely increased EHR adoption in hospitals. I think it also did in ambulatory environments as well, but not quite to the extent of hospitals.

Can we just put the discussion of whether HITECH helped EHR adoption to rest? It increased EHR adoption.

To me that’s not the question that really matters. What really matters is whether the EHR incentive money has incented adoption of the right EHR software. It’s great that we’ve adopted EHR software, but have we just locked ourselves in to the wrong software for the next 5+ years? Or have we implemented a great EHR foundation that will prove to be extremely beneficial to healthcare for decades to come?

I look forward to a deep discussion in the comments.

Video Demonstration of End-to-End ICD-10 Testing

Posted on May 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve heard a lot of people suggest that an organization needed to do end-to-end ICD-10 testing in order to prepare for the switchover to ICD-10 on October 1, 2015 (we think). I came across this video demonstration of Qualitest doing an end-to-end test of ICD-10:

What do you think of the demo? Is this a valuable thing to do? Should this be done with every EHR and PM vendor and with every vendor that connects to that software?

Deep Thoughts from Einstein Applied to Health IT

Posted on May 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


Ok, to be honest, I don’t really want to fact check if Einstein really said this or not. You might know how quotes from famous people were often not said by said famous person. However, that doesn’t really matter to me since the above quote was too interesting not to share.

I really like the idea that the key to solving really challenging problems is to stay with the problems longer. The biggest challenge I think we face in healthcare IT is that far too many people are running around like chickens with their head cut off. I understand completely why it’s happening. The regulations and stimulus have created this maniacal set of requirements that require a bit of running around like crazy people.

I don’t think the major problems of healthcare can be solved through a maniacal chasing of incentives and regulations that we see in healthcare today.

If we want to really go after and solve major problems, then we have to stay with the problems a little longer and not head off to the next problem too quickly or even ignore a problem that seems challenging or even impossible. I realize that this is much easier said than done. We easily let the fires of today prevent us from preventing the fires that will come tomorrow, next month, and next year. It’s natural to do.

The thing that gives me most hope is the amazing people working in healthcare. The majority are great people trying to make a difference for good. Now we just need those good people working in healthcare IT can take a bit more time and stay with the problems of healthcare a little longer before they move on to put out the next fire.

ICD-10 Preparedness

Posted on May 12, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is some email comments from Richard D. Tomlinson, RN and Founder of Nuclei Health Consultancy, in reply to my post on ICD-10 Business Areas of Concern. They weren’t intended for posting, but I thought they were quite insightful and so Rick gave me permission to share them.

Wonderful post (as always) relative to our issues driving yet another future-state condition in healthcare, namely ICD-10. If I may, I would like to approach ICD-10 from another perspective.

While everyone knows that ICD-10 is (eventually) a reality for U.S. healthcare organizations, I convey there is much more to addressing ICD-10 CM/PCS than simply “making the conversion” or “dual coding” as benchmarks towards success. My own list of preparedness relative to ICD-10 is somewhat different than yours and designed to combine strategic as well as tactile integration to address ICD-10 CM/PCS.

1. Clinical Documentation Improvement process.
2. Roust education via clinical case studies showing the BUSINESS CASE IMPACTS downstream of inadequate clinical documentation & coding.
3. ICD-10 Gap analysis current-state to include clinical and financial gaps.
4. Validation testing of via test patient build/coding.
5. EHR optimization specific to ICD-10 (MORE is NOT BETTER).
6. Evaluation of CAC (Computer Assisted Coding).
7. Evaluation of alternative coding resources (e.g. outsourcing).
8. Viability Reporting to C-Suite (not simply “on track” reporting. It’s not a project; it’s an initiative. Establish and report on critical success factors).
9. Establishment of robust clinical documentation/ICD-10 ad hoc committees. Include CMIO or provider champion/HIM/financial/quality/informatics/IT
10. Establishment of robust analytics to reverse engineer denials (where/what/whom) and specific identification of mitigation actions (e.g. education, CDI, etc) and processes.

The bottom line in my view is this; any organization treating ICD-10 as a “conversion” is headed for significant problems in terms of denials and missed revenue capture. ICD-10 should be viewed by the C-Suite specifically as a platform to improve patient safety/care, to improve clinical documentation, improve quality measures, and a specific strategy to reduce costs and increase potential revenue capture. Properly deployed, ICD-10 initiatives can actually accomplish all of this. My suggestion to my clients is to approach ICD-10 strategically, not merely as a conversion process, and develop a plan incorporating the measures I’ve indicated above. Serious Measurement of these factors will be required, regardless of facility type or size.

Lastly, I think some organizations are mistakenly treating this not only as a “conversion” but also siloing this to the small HIM or coding backroom as a problem for the coders. This approach will paint the coders into an unfortunate corner, and may create a situation where optimum revenue capture opportunities are lost…forever. For example, improper coding of a patient acquiring bed sores while inpatient may result in denials and reduce certain quality scores inappropriately. When you consider that coding is the final life blood touchpoint of revenue generation, it’s time for the C-Suite to leverage ICD-10 as a strategy to place importance of improved clinical documentation as a business case, and measure the clinical, financial, and operational impacts to the organization.

The Magic of Community

Posted on May 9, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today was the final day of the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference (HITMC) which I organize. The event is a lot of work, but the community that it’s created is absolutely golden. I really happened upon a unique community that had never been brought together before. Before this conference, healthcare marketing and PR professionals really didn’t have a place to go and learn and connect with people doing the same work they do. As Brian Mack mentioned at the end of the conference “This is the first conference where I didn’t have to explain to people what I did for work.” Someone else commented on how every person they talked to at the conference was someone who spoke their same language.

There’s really something magical about growing a community of like minded individuals. There’s value in expanding your horizons and hearing people from outside of your niche as well. Both can be valuable, but when you’re dealing with challenging problems, it’s great to be able to work with people who have seen those challenges before. That’s something that’s really hard to replace and is golden when you find it.

I think that’s why in healthcare websites like PatientsLikeMe have been so successful. Last year one of the HITMC attendees described his experience like “finally finding his tribe.” Patients have that same need. For example, my wife has hashimoto’s and whenever she meets someone who has the same issue, there’s an instant bond of shared experience. It’s a beautiful thing.

What’s going to be interesting as healthcare evolves is what new online healthcare communities will come to be. Will hospitals create communities for their patients? Will primary care doctors in an area create a community of users interested in being healthy? Will an ACO require these types of healthy communities?

Don’t underestimate the power of bringing together people facing similar challenges. There’s a magic in community that’s really special. Back to the HITMC community, I feel lucky to be part of such a caring group of individuals who really want to improve healthcare.

Videos of EHR Usability Suggestions

Posted on May 6, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of my readers sent me a link to a new site they’re developing called SaveTimeMD. This website was created as a response by an internist and EHR developer that was tired of seeing so many EHR usability problems. He decided that he’d take usability problems from users and make videos explaining how he’d resolve the EHR usability issue.

I think the concept is quite interesting. Many might ask why he doesn’t just build the perfect EHR if he’s so good at solving the usability problems. That’s the way my entrepreneurial mind would work. However, some people don’t approach problems with that entrepreneurial mindset. I’m not sure this doctor’s motivation, but I think the concept is quite interesting.

Here’s one of the videos he’s created that talks about intuitively navigating an EHR:

What do you think of the video? More importantly, what do you think of the idea of someone offering answers to your EHR usability challenges which you could take back to your EHR vendor?