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Moving from “Reporting on” to “Leading” Healthcare – A Conversation with Dr. Halee Fischer-Wright, President & CEO of MGMA

Posted on October 11, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

In Chapter 3 of Dr. Halee Fischer-Wright’s new book Back to Balance, she writes: “People are increasingly being treated as if they are the same. Science and data are being used to decrease variability in an attempt to get doctors to treat patients in predictable ways.” This statement is Fischer-Wright’s way of saying that the current focus on standardization of healthcare processes in the quest to reduce costs and increase quality may not be the brass ring we should be striving for. She believes that a balance is needed between healthcare standardization and the fact that each patient is a unique individual.

As president of the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), a role Fischer-Wright has held since 2015, she is uniquely positioned to see first-hand the impact standardization (from both legislative and technological forces) has had on the medical profession. With over 40,000 members, MGMA represents many of America’s physician practices – a group particularly hard hit over the past few years by the technology compliance requirements of Meaningful Use and changes to reimbursements.

For many physician practices Meaningful Use has turned out to be more of a compliance program rather than an incentive program. To meet the program’s requirements, physicians have had to alter their workflows and documentation approaches. Complying with the program and satisfying the reporting requirements became the focus, which Fischer-Wright believes is a terrible unintended consequence.

“We have been so focused on standardizing the way doctors work that we have taken our eyes off the real goal,” said Fischer-Wright in and interview with HealthcareScene. “As physicians our focus needs to be on patient outcomes not whether we documented the encounter in a certain way. In our drive to mass standardization, we are in danger of ingraining the false belief that populations of patients behave in the same way and can be treated through a single standardized treatment regimen. That’s simply not the case. Patients are unique.”

Achieving a balance in healthcare will not be easy – a sentiment that permeates Back to Balance, but Fischer-Wright is certain that healthcare technology will play a key role: “We need HealthIT companies to stop focusing just on what can be done and start working on enabling what needs to be done. Physicians want to leverage technology to deliver better care to patient at a lower cost, but not at the expense of the patient/physician relationship. Let’s stop building tools that force doctors to stare at the computer screen instead of making eye contact with their patients.”

To that end, Fischer-Wright issued a friendly challenge to the vendors in the MGMA17 exhibit hall: “Create products and services that physicians actually enjoy using. Help reduce barriers between physician, patients and between healthcare organizations. Empower care don’t detract from it.”

She went on to say that MGMA itself will be stepping up to help champion the cause of better HealthIT for patients AND physicians. In fact, Fischer-Wright was excited to talk about the new direction for MGMA as an organization. For most of its history, MGMA has reported on the healthcare industry from a physician practice perspective. Over the past year with the help of a supportive Board of Directors and active members, the MGMA leadership team has begun to shift the organization to a more prominent leadership role.

“We are going to take a much more active role in healthcare. We are going to focus on fixing healthcare from the ground up –  from providers & patients upwards. In the next few years MGMA will be much bigger, much strong and even more relevant to physician practices. We are forging partnerships with other key players in healthcare, federal/state/local governments and other associations/societies.“

Members should expect more conferences, more educational opportunities and more publications on a more frequent basis from MGMA going forward. Fischer-Wright also hinted at several new technology-related offerings but opted not to provide details. Looking at the latest news from MGMA on their revamped data-gathering/analytics, however, it would not be surprising if their new offerings were data related. MGMA is one of the few organizations that regularly collects information on and provides context on the state of physician practices in the US.

It will be exciting to watch MGMA evolve in the years ahead.

MGMA17 Day 1 – Drawing Inspiration from Consumer Experience

Posted on October 9, 2017 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Last night, attendees celebrated the opening of the Medical Group Management Association’s annual conference (MGMA17) in Anaheim CA with a block party that featured local food trucks instead of traditional food-stations. This welcome twist allowed attendees to sample small portions from several vendors.

The block party was a reflection of the exhibitor reception that happened earlier in the evening. With just 90 minutes, attendees could only sample a small portion of the 300 vendors that filled two halls in the Anaheim Convention Center. Despite that short amount of time, a key theme emerged – consumer experiences are serving as inspiration for HealthIT companies.

Ken Comée, CEO of CareCloud, summed it up this way: “Patients have high expectations from their healthcare providers now. They want the same level of service and convenience that they get from Amazon, Uber, OpenTable and banks.”

Prominently featured in the CareCloud booth was Breeze – a recently announced platform developed in partnership with First Data (see this blog post for more details). Comée had this to say about their new platform “If I had to compare Breeze to a consumer experience, I would have to say that it is most similar to checking in for a flight. Very few people check in for their flight in-person at the airport anymore. Almost everyone checks in at home on their computer or via their phone well ahead of their flight. You fill in all the relevant information online and you just show up to the airport and go where you need to go. There’s no paperwork you have to fill out, no need to arrive early…it’s just a smooth seamless experience. Armed with Breeze, our clients can now offer that same airline check-in experience with new as well as returning patients.”

A few booths over, David Rodriguez founder of NextPatient, talked about how OpenTable was one of the inspirations for their online appointment-booking platform. “In today’s world, when a person arrives at the website of a restaurant, they want to be able to see the times when they can make a reservation and they want to be able to click the time they want, fill in no more than 2 or 3 key pieces of information and lock it in. That’s what we offer physician practices – an elegant way to allow patients to click and book an appointment right from the practice’s own website without complex coding.”

Calibrater Health, a company that texts surveys to patients after a visit and creates “tickets” for any responses with a low NPS, was inspired by ZenDesk. Though not technically a consumer-facing application, ZenDesk does help companies forge and manage relationships with end-users by streamlining customer-service workflows, something Calibrater brings to its clients.

Patient engagement vendor, Relatient, drew inspiration from salon experiences. For many years it has been common practice in the salon and spa industries to send customers friendly reminders of their upcoming appointments via voice, text and email. Not only did these reminders reduce no-shows, but they also helped to improve customer loyalty. The Relatient solution brings those same benefits to healthcare organizations.

The night’s most thoughtful story of consumer inspiration came from Aaron Glauser, Senior Director of Product Marketing at AdvancedMD. “If I had to pick a consumer experience that inspires me and that we are closest to, it’d have to be Amazon. When you search Amazon for a product, a lot of matching entries come up – just like searching online for a doctor. You then narrow the search by looking at the star ratings and the reviews. Once you decide on a product, you click in and you decide how, when and where you want it delivered. That’s how patients want to book appointments. With AdvancedMD they can choose an open appointment time and they can even opt for a telemedicine appointment. That’s analogous to whether I want the physical book or the Kindle version on Amazon. Then as a user I get to choose how I want to pay for my Amazon purchase – which we can offer through AdvancedMD.”

Whether its Amazon, Zendesk, OpenTable, a salon or an airline that has served as inspiration. What was made clear on Day 1 of MGMA17’s exhibit hall is that consumer-experiences have become an important factor in the design of HealthIT solutions…and healthcare will be better for it.

Telus Health Continues EMR M&A Strategy – Acquires Nightingale Informatix

Posted on July 18, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Telus Health, a Canadian based healthcare technology and services firm that is a division of one of Canada’s largest telco operators (Telus Communications), recently announced the acquisition of Nightingale Informatix for $14 Million CDN (approximately $10.4M USD).

You can read the announcement here.

This is the latest in a string of acquisitions that Telus has made over the past 5 years in the Canadian ambulatory EMR space. Med Access, Wolf Medical Systems, Kinlogix, MD Physician Services, Medesync and now Nightingale are all part of Telus Health’s product portfolio. With these acquisitions Telus is now by far the most dominant player in the Canadian ambulatory market. There are only a handful of vendors remaining – the largest of which is Vancouver’s QHR Technologies.

EMR consolidation in Canada was inevitable. The small market size could not sustain the more than 50 EMR vendors that cropped up in the heyday of adoption. As well, unlike in the US, the government in Canada did not pour billions of dollars to encourage physicians to adopt EMR technologies. The incentive programs in Canada were handled by the provinces and were much smaller in scale. Thus the Canadian market was ripe for consolidation and Telus has been aggressively seizing these opportunities.

It is a little surprising that none of the US EMR vendors have looked north of the border for growth opportunities. With a single payer system and unique patient identifiers, you would think the Canadian market would be enticing. However, no US ambulatory EMR has made significant in-roads.

Missed opportunity? or perhaps a wise decision to focus at home?

*Disclosure – This writer was VP of Marketing at Nightingale Informatix from 2012-2014.

[CORRECTION – July 19, 2016 2:11pm ET – The original post erroneously reported that Telus had acquired Healthscreen, EMIS and Clinicare EMRs. These three EMRs were in fact acquired by QHR Technologies and not Telus. This post was updated with a corrected list of Telus acquisitions]

5 Reasons Why Canada Could Be a Hotbed for EHR innovation

Posted on June 4, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

From June 5th to 8th thousands of Canadian HealthIT professionals, government representatives, hospital leaders and policy consultants will gather for the annual eHealth Conference (#eHealth2016) in Vancouver. This event is like HIMSS, but smaller and focused on Canada.

Full disclosure: I am Canadian, but I spend about 80% of my time focused on US Healthcare. I manage to stay informed about the happenings in my home country through the tweets and posts of people like Glenn Lanteigne @GlennLanteigne, Mark Casselman @markcasselman, Michael Martineau @eHealthMusings, Colleen Young @colleen_young and Pat Rich @pat_health

Ahead of the #eHealth2016 conference Pat Rich sent out this tweet:

This tweet got me thinking about the state of EHRs in my home country. After hours of catching up on the latest Canadian EHR news – a light bulb went off – Canada could be the ideal test bed for new EHR innovations.

Here’s 5 reasons why

Reason 1 – No Meaningful Use, MACRA or MIPS

Like the US, Canada did allocate government dollars to help encourage the adoption of EHRs by physician practices and healthcare institutions. However, the dollars given out to Canadians paled in comparison to the US $34B CMS program. In fact, in some provinces (like Quebec) the incentive payments were so insignificant that many choose not to fill out the paperwork to receive their funding.

As well, none of the incentive programs have attestation requirements similar to the US Meaningful Use criteria. Nor do Canadian programs have penalties for not adopting an EHR.

This combination of relatively low incentive dollars, lack of MU-style adherence programs and zero penalties means that EHR vendors in Canada are relatively free to pursue their own product roadmaps. There is less government and end-user pressure to build functionality simply to meet funding criteria. Instead, EHR vendors can focus more on what end-users really want (better user interfaces anyone?)

Reason 2 – PIPEDA vs HIPAA

Canada does have privacy legislation. It’s called PIPEDA and it places the onus on healthcare organizations to protect the personal identifiable health information of patients. At a high level the protections for health information under PIPEDA is similar to that of the US HIPAA laws.

The biggest difference, however, is in the attitude of healthcare providers towards PIPEDA vs HIPAA. In Canada PIPEDA is not thought of as a barrier to information sharing. Privacy is definitely a concern, but PIPEDA isn’t used as often as an excuse to prevent access to information.

Reason 3 – Single Payer

Each provincial government in Canada is the single payer for healthcare for its citizens. If you live in Ontario and you go to the hospital, the hospital bills the Ontario government for the care you received. There are no other payers involved, no co-pays, nothing.

For EHR vendors this makes payment processing and collection a lot simpler – giving them more time to focus on other areas of EHR functionality.

Reason 4 – Patient Identifiers

A beneficial consequence of the single-payer system is that every person in Canada has a unique patient identifier. Consolidating health information from multiple healthcare organizations is therefore much easier since every lab result, prescription, requisition and image has this unique identifier. It’s Canada’s built-in unique key.

Reason 5 – Sorry, eh.

Canadians by nature are very apologetic. We say “sorry” when people bump into us. We apologize when we feel we are inconveniencing someone else. It’s something in the water.

I’ve personally found Canadian end-users to be very tolerant and understanding of new technologies. It’s not in our nature to complain so things have to go REALLY wrong before we make it an issue. Admittedly I have a small sample size, but when I speak to HealthIT vendors doing business in Canada, I hear similar stories.

Conclusion

In combination, the 5 reasons above create an innovation-friendly environment for EHR vendors. Instead of having product functionality dictated by government legislation and financial incentives, vendors are free to incorporate real end-user feedback into their EHR platforms. They can push the usability envelop in a tolerant environment where privacy isn’t used as a blocker to progress.

Maybe I’m delusional, but I’m really hoping to see signs of EHR innovation at the upcoming #eHealth2016 conference. If you are an EHR vendor that’s doing business in Canada and you are doing something innovative with user experience or functionality I want to hear from you!

No Single Theme Dominated HIMSS16 and That’s Exciting!

Posted on March 8, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

HIMSS 2016 Attendance Numbers

Last week, over 41,000 people descended on Las Vegas for the annual HIMSS conference, #HIMSS16. Attendance was down slightly compared to the previous year, but it sure didn’t feel like it in the crowded hallways and aisles in the Sands Expo Center.

I truly enjoy HIMSS in Vegas. I find that people are more energetic and more willing to conduct business when the conference is held there. It feels like it is easier to have conversations with people in Vegas. Perhaps it is the oxygen they pump into the casinos or perhaps it is simply the aura of the town rubbing off on people.

Having impromptu conversations is one of things I love most about HIMSS. I always gain a tremendous amount of perspective when I randomly stop and chat with people in the exhibit hall. That trend continued this year, but after the first day, I felt something was missing from my discussions. It wasn’t until today that I realized what that was…there was no single consistent theme from #HIMSS16.

Over the past several years there has always been a single topic that dominated the conversations at HIMSS. Interoperability, Meaningful Use, Big Data, Patient Engagement and Population Health have all been hot-button HIMSS themes. This year, no single dominant topic emerged. There was certainly talk about gender parity, interoperability, moving to a value-based system, telehealth and Big Data, but there was no consistency to the conversations I had with fellow attendees.

I think this is a good sign. In fact, I’m excited about it.

HealthIT is in a state of flux right now. Meaningful Use is winding down, ICD-10 is in the rearview mirror and the hype around digital health is starting to wane. For the first time in years, vendors and healthcare CIOs are free to chart their own paths, pursue their own interests. This is something that hasn’t happened since the EHR incentive program started back in 2010.

Through this lens, the conversations at #HIMSS16 show me that we are about to see progress on many different fronts. Some people I spoke to are looking to invest in new decision support tools that employ the latest in artificial intelligence. Others are seeking new ways of using public data to assist in population health. Everyone I spoke to had one or two projects that they were FINALLY going to get a chance to start in 2016.

This is very exciting and I can’t wait to see how all this pent-up innovative energy manifests for the remainder of 2016.

#HIMSS16 Day 0 – Exhibit Hall Tetris

Posted on February 29, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Arriving the day before the craziness of HIMSS is an annual tradition for most vendors. The Saturday and Sunday before the main conference are the days when most of the booth building activity happens inside the HIMSS exhibit hall.

I have always enjoyed these pre-conference days at HIMSS. Being in the exhibit hall while booths are being constructed is like watching a life-sized game of Tetris. It’s fun to watch the army of tradespeople unpack crates and piece together complex booths while following instructions that look eerily like those you find with Lego building sets.

#HIMSS16 features move vendors than ever before. Over 1300 booths sprawl across multiple halls in the Sands Expo Center in Las Vegas Nevada. With this many vendors, the aisle-ways were especially difficult to navigate during setup. It’s a testament to the skill of the forklift drivers that they managed to squeeze all the crates in and round the booth areas for setup.

HIMSS16 Exhibit Hall 1

As a marketer and engineer, I relish the opportunity to have a preview of the booths before the hall opens. Every year I find at least five or six booths of unique/fresh design that I add to my must-visit list.

This year was no exception.

HIMSS16 Philips Booth
The Philips booth (3416) looks very impressive this year with four floor-to-ceiling LED displays that look like the ones they use in Football stadiums. The booth itself is beautifully accented with a stunning chandelier in the center. I can’t wait to see it in action when the hall opens.

The CDW Healthcare (3606), SalesForce (10525) and Cerner (2032) booths are also intriguing. I’m particularly interested in the SalesForce booth – partly because of the design but mostly because I’m curious to see how their healthcare offering is shaping up.

If you see a cool or interesting booth over the next few days, I hope you’ll tweet out a notification or post something to the HIMSS16 mobile app.

#HIMSS16 Mix Tape

Posted on February 5, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

On February 29th the #HealthIT community will descend on Las Vegas for the annual HIMSS conference and exhibition.

One of the best parts about attending HIMSS is getting the chance to meet people in real life who I interact with through social media. There is nothing quite like meeting someone face to face for the first time yet feeling like you already know them. I think hugging and fist bumps are the official greetings at HIMSS. It’s an absolute blast to be able to share stories and laughs with likes of Mandi Bishop, John Lynn , Rasu Shrestha and Wen Dombrowski.

With an expected attendance of 45,000 this year, I’m hoping to meet even more people than ever before at the various HIMSS gatherings.

Last year, ahead of HIMSS15, I decided to do a fun blog post. I asked some friends to send me a song they thought reflected what was happening in #HealthIT at the time. I compiled everyone’s selections along with the reasons behind their choice. I called it the HIMSS15 Mix Tape. The response was amazing. I had so many people DM me and stop me at the conference to give me their song choice. Even John Lynn blogged about it.

This year, I asked an even larger number of friends to contribute a song. So without further rambling, here is the #HIMSS16 Mix Tape. Enjoy!

HIMSS16 Mix Tape

Night on Bald Mountain – Disney’s Fantasia. Chosen by Regina Holliday @ReginaHolliday. “Disney. Because although morning will come, we now walk among the terrors.”

Confident – Demi Levato. Chosen by Mandi Bishop @MandiBPro. “For a couple reasons: 1) it’s beyond time #HealthITChicks / #WomenInHIT got equal recognition and pay for their contributions to the field, and I’m seeing an increasing strength of voice supporting those efforts, 2) patients have had enough of their attempts to engage being discounted by clinicians and other caregivers, and we are all demanding respect and inclusion at the table of our healthcare decisions.”

Stronger – Kelly Clarkson. Chosen by John Lynn @techguy. “This should be the anthem of those of us in healthcare IT.  First, do no harm, but don’t be afraid to take some risks and make mistakes.  Not taking some risks is killing more people than doing something and sometimes making mistakes.  Healthcare will be stronger for the mistakes we make.”

Runnin’ Down A Dream –  Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. Chosen by Melody Smith Jones @melsmithjones. “I got into this industry because my grandmother died of cancer in rural USA in 2003. I’ve been running down the dream of care everywhere ever since. I believe 2016 will bring us the most growth in Connected Health that we have seen to date.”

Talk to Me – Stevie Nicks. Chosen by David Harlow @healthblawg. “The chorus includes the line: “You can talk to me/You can set your secrets free, baby” which can be read as a coded message to legacy systems … One of the verses goes: “Our voices stray from the common ground where they/Could meet/The walls run high/ … / Oh, let the walls burn down, set your secrets free” — a prescient call to interoperability, to communication, to enabling broader collaboration across provider, payor and health care information technology silos. We’re almost there, Stevie.”

Heroes – David Bowie. Chosen by Nick van Terheyden @drnic1. “Because I love that track and was sad to see David Bowie leave this universe. But also: We need to be heroes for Healthcare and I hope Healthcare Technology can beat the madness of our system and Ch-ch-ch-ch-change the world:

A million dead-end streets / And every time I thought I’d got it made / It seemed the taste was not so sweet…… / We can be Heroes, just for one day / We can beat them, for ever and ever … ICYMI – I blended the lyrics from David Bowie’s Changes with Heroes”

Another Brick in the Wall – Pink Floyd. Chosen by Rasu Shrestha @RasuShrestha. “In memory of Meaningful Use ‘All in all it was just a brick in the wall…’ “

Numb – Linkin Park. Chosen by me @Colin_Hung. I think many physicians, nurses, administrators and patients are numb from all the competing priorities this past year and from the years of chasing Meaningful User dollars. I think this verse sums it up:

I’m tired of being what you want me to be / Feeling so faithless, lost under the surface / Don’t know what you’re expecting of me / Put under the pressure of walking in your shoes / (Caught in the undertow, just caught in the undertow) / Every step that I take is another mistake to you

Fire – Jimi Hendrix. Chosen by Chad Johnson @OchoTex. “The reason is simple: HL7 FHIR continues to dominate the headlines and discussions around health data interoperability, and rightfully so. FHIR will bring exciting changes to interoperability.”

Taking Care of Business – Bachman-Turner Overdrive. Chosen by Charles Webster @wareFLO. “Taking care of business in healthcare means getting sh*%$t done. Effectively and efficiently accomplishing goals is only possible with great…wait for it…WORKFLOW”

I Want It All – Queen. Chosen by Joe Lavelle @Resultant. “Because we want it all – Interoperability, “our damn data”, #mhealth, Patient Engagement, Population Health, Telemedicine. etc.”

Robot Rock – Daft Punk. Chosen by AJ Montpetit @ajmontpetit. “We’re heading to the integration of AI into healthcare to create a streamlined experience, and assist in comprehension of all the multiple factors that each patient has individually.”

Upgrade U – Beyoncé. Chosen by Cari McLean @carimclean. “I’ll go with a song that not only always makes me dance but one that reflects a growing happening in healthcare. I chose this song because the EHR replacement market is growing as the rip and replace trend continues and health information exchange is prioritized.”

Give Me Novacaine – Green Day. Chosen by Linda Stotsky @EMRAnswers. “LOL- because providers are in PAIN!!! They need something to soften the blows”

Changes – David Bowie. Chosen by Brad Justus @BradJustus. “A classic from a classic and something that is a constant in #HealthIT”

Fight Song – Rachel Platten. Chosen by Jennifer Dennard @JennDennard. “I think it encapsulates the #healthITchicks ethos – not to mention patient advocates’ – quite well :)”

 What Do You Mean – Justin Bieber. Chosen by Sarah Bennight @sarahbennight. “For SO many reasons. What do you mean MU is going away? What do you mean you need me to fill out ANOTHER demographic profile, what do you mean you don’t have my allergies? What do you mean by interoperable? I could go on all day, but we all have real jobs to do….like to figure out this healthcare IT thing :) Plus in the Justin B song…you hear a clock…do you ever feel like Health IT is running out of time? I don’t agree with JB on ANYTHING, but I agree we are running out of time.”

Shape of Things – David Bowie. Chosen by Pat Rich @pat_health. “In my mind this song evokes the futuristic world of health IT in a steampunk/sci-fi sort of way”

Hello – Adele. Chosen by Bill Bunting @WTBunting. “Because there is an emerging side of healthcare that’s trying to break free and be heard (i.e. adoption), and no one is answering the call to do so”

Under Pressure – Queen & David Bowie. Chosen by Joy Rios @askjoyrios. “There is so much pressure to get through these health IT initiatives unscathed and there’s so much at risk if they get it wrong.  I see providers across the country dealing with so much change, when they mostly just want to focus on their practice. Unfortunately, the changes are not letting up. I feel like the healthcare system is right in the middle of its metamorphosis… not a caterpillar anymore, but by no means a butterfly!”

Please Please Me – The Beatles. Chosen by Jim Tate @jimtate. “Providers want better EHRs”

New New Minglewood Blues – The Grateful Dead. Chosen by Brian Ahier @ahier. “Because I was inspired by this @healthblawg post ‘The New New Meaningful Use’ “

EHR State of Mind – ZDoggMDChosen by Andy DeLaO @CancerGeek. “Does it really need an explanation? J”

Dha Tete – Pandit Shyamal Bose. Chosen by Wen Dombrowski @HealthcareWen. “Some reasons I like this song:

  • Focus, Mindfulness
  • Flow states
  • Collaboration, Staying in Sync with each other (it is actually 2 people duet)
  • Speed, Moving fast
  • Precision, deciveness
  • Artistry, Beauty”

You Can Get It If You Really Want – Jimmy Cliff. Chosen by Steve Sisko @ShimCode. “I believe true, widespread interoperability is not that far away. The technology, standards (FHIR, OpenNotes), and group consensus (outfits like CommonWell, The Sequoia Project) are finally coming together.

You can get it if you really want / But you must try, try and try, try and try / You’ll succeed at last

Do you have a song you think reflects #HealthIT or healthcare at the moment? Add it to the comments below!

[Update: Here is a link to a Spotify playlist of the entire #HIMSS16 Mix Tape https://open.spotify.com/user/12163763158/playlist/7mO6DlpVa4MoJ7roW0bqiG or if you like videos, here is a YouTube playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOxadHqniaPTYUUY5cMSmW14VZQpngUOU]

Ashley Madison Data Breach – A Lesson for Health IT

Posted on July 28, 2015 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The recent hack of the Ashley Madison, Cougar Life and Established Men infidelity/hookup websites has been front page news. Overnight the lives of 50 million site members (pun intended) were potentially stolen by a hacker group calling itself “The Impact Team”. The Washington Post and CNBC have great articles on the details of the hack.

As the story unfolded I became more and more fascinated, not because of the scandalous nature of the data, but because I believe this hack is a lesson for all of us that work in #HealthIT.

The value of the data that is held in EHRs and other health apps is somewhat debatable. There have been claims that a single health record is worth 10-200 times more than credit card data on the black market. The higher value is due to the potential access to prescription medications and/or the potential to use health data to commit Medicare fraud. A recent NPR post indicates that the value of a single patient’s record is approximately $470 but there is not a lot of strong evidence to support this valuation (see John Lynn’s post on this topic here).

While $470 may seem like a lot, I believe that for many patients, the reputational value of their health data is far higher. Suppose, for example you were a patient at a behavioral health clinic. You have kept your treatment secret. No one in your family or your employer know about it. Now suppose that your clinic’s EHR was breached and a hacker asked you for $470 to keep your data from being posted to the Internet. I think many would seriously consider forking over the cash.

To me this hypothetical healthcare situation is analogous to what happened with Ashley Madison. The membership data itself likely has little intrinsic value (even credit card data is only worth a few dollars). HOWEVER, the reputational value of this data is extremely high. The disruption and damage to the lives of Ashley Madison customers is enormous (though some say well deserved).

The fall-out for the company behind Ashley Madison (Avid Life Media – a Canadian company) will also be severe. They have completely lost the trust of their customers and I do not believe that any amount of market spin or heart-felt apology will be enough to save them from financial ruin.

I believe what Avid Life Media is going through is what most small-medium sized clinics and #HealthIT vendors would face if all their patient data was exposed. Patients would utterly lose faith and take their business elsewhere (though admittedly that might be a little harder if other clinic choices were not covered by your insurance). Even if the organization could afford the HHS Office for Civil Rights fines for the data breach, the impact of lost patients and lost trust would be more devastating.

With the number of health data breaches increasing, how long before healthcare has its own version of Ashley Madison? We need to do more to protect patient data, it can no longer be an after-thought. Data security and privacy need to be part of the design process of software and of healthcare organizations.

Life’s short. Secure your data!

Dropout Docs – The Answer for #HealthIT Startups?

Posted on July 23, 2015 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

We’d like to welcome a new guest blogger to our ranks. If you’re on social media, you probably know Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung), Co-Host of #hcldr. Colin is also head of Marketing for @PatientPrompt, a product offered by Stericycle Communication Solutions. We look forward to many posts from Colin in the future.

Recently both Nick van Terheyden (@drnic1) and Mandi Bishop (@MandiBPro) shared a link to an interesting article via Facebook. “Dropout Docs: Bay Area Doctors Quit Medicine to Work for Digital Health Startups”.
Dropout Doctors - Bay Area Doctors Leave Medicine for Healthcare Startups
The article highlights a new phenomenon happening In the Bay area – would-be doctors are dropping out of prestigious medical schools to pursue careers in digital health. Even those that complete their schooling are opting to join digital health start-ups/incubators (like Rock Health located in San Francisco, very close to USCF Medical Center) rather than apply for residency.

Being a doctor or a surgeon was once the pinnacle of achievement in American society, but with changes to reimbursements and general healthcare frustration, many are not seeing the practice of medicine as the rosy utopia it used to be (or was it ever?). Now even physicians are succumbing to the siren call of #HealthIT where there is a chance to “do good” and make a difference on a large scale.

I believe this trend could be a good thing for #HealthIT. Having more peers who are enthusiastic and passionate about improving healthcare can lead to more positive innovations. Consider the following quote from a doctor who joined a health care company instead of practicing medicine (from the KQED article):

“I realized that the system isn’t designed for doctors to make the real change you would like to for the patient.”

Having more people who want to put the patient at the center of healthcare makes my #HealthIT heart race. You can’t teach people to have this inner fire. It is something that is intrinsic to the individual…and we need more peers in #HealthIT with this flame.

There is just one line from the article that don’t agree with:

“…dropout doctors are well-positioned for a career in digital health as they have an insider’s view of the industry – and ideas about how to fix it.”

I think it is a bit of a stretch to say that people who went through med-school have a true “insider’s view”. Having not worked in a practice or in a healthcare setting, they would not be familiar with the political, financial or workflow aspects of care on the front lines. I hope these doc-dropouts are humble enough to remain open-minded as they listen to real-life customers provide feedback on the technologies and solutions they are involved with. In fact, dropout docs would be well served by remembering one particular part of their medical training – truly listening to the patient – which in this case may be the entirety of healthcare.