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A Hospital CIO Perspective on Precision Medicine

Posted on July 31, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

#Paid content sponsored by Intel.

In this video interview, I talk with David Chou, Vice President, Chief Information and Digital Officer with Kansas City, Missouri-based Children’s Mercy Hospital. In addition to his work at Children’s Mercy, he helps healthcare organizations transform themselves into digital enterprises.

Chou previously served as a healthcare technology advisor with law firm Balch & Bingham and Chief Information Officer with the University of Mississippi Medical Center. He also worked with the Cleveland Clinic to build a flagship hospital in Abu Dhabi, as well as working in for-profit healthcare organizations in California.

Precision Medicine and Genomic Medicine are important topics for every hospital CIO to understand. In my interview with David Chou, he provides the hospital CIO perspective on these topics and offers insights into what a hospital organization should be doing to take part in and be prepared for precision medicine and genomic medicine.

Here are the questions I asked him, if you’d like to skip to a specific topic in the video or check out the full video interview embedded below:

What are you doing in your organization when it comes to precision medicine and genomic medicine?

Our Final 2017 #HIT100 List

Posted on July 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Much like social media, the #HIT100 is never without a few challenges, but I’m also happy to say that this year’s #HIT100 exhibited an extreme amount of gratitude and appreciation from and for thousands of people in the healthcare social media community.

I’m impressed by the number of people participating in the #HIT100. Symplur calculated that the #HIT100 hashtag generated 42 million impressions across 6195 tweets and 1852 participants (some just used the hashtag for discussion and not a nomination). Those are impressive numbers.

As I mentioned, I don’t intend to publish a ranked list of the #HIT100 as has been done in past years since I think ranking on the #HIT100 can be easily gamed and therefore ranking on the list has little meaning. However, I think a list of 100 social media accounts that many in the community recognize as valuable is something worth sharing. It’s a great way to discover new accounts, be reminded of accounts you haven’t seen in a while, and find new sources of information and insights into the industry. This year we had quite a few people I’d never seen before and what seems like a larger international group than previous years.

I’d hoped to find a way to publish the final 2017 #HIT100 list where it would list the top 100 accounts in random order that changed on every refresh. Unfortunately, I didn’t have the time available to really flesh this out. So, I’ve resorted to publishing the #HIT100 list in reverse ABC order (because the A’s always get first and so why not the Z’s this time?).

Over time I hope to publish other interesting insights and charts from the nominations including popular hashtags, other engagement stats, those only nominated by one person to the #HIT100, those who weren’t on previous #HIT100 lists, etc. For now, take a minute and browse through this impressive list of people who largely care about using technology to improve healthcare.

Finally, a big thank you to Joe Warbington (@JWarbington) from Qlik for providing a pretty amazing tool for me to analyze all the #HIT100 nominations and Dennis Dailey (@_hitshow) who suggested I work with them. I’d seen Qlik work on EHR data, but I didn’t realize it could so easily collect and analyze Twitter data as well. Thanks to them for providing the tool I could use to analyze all the nominations.

Data Disclaimer: We made an effort to ensure the data was as accurate as possible for this list. However, since we see this just as a fun activity of social discovery and appreciation, we didn’t go to great lengths to ensure the accuracy and won’t be publishing the “rank” on the list. In fact, we’re sure it’s not 100% accurate. If that’s an issue for you, we welcome you to pull the data from Twitter and do your own analysis. We welcome any and all to take the nominations and use them however they may. The beauty of the #HIT100 is that it’s all available to anyone to assess, slice, dice, interpret, and use however they see fit. If people publish 20 different #HIT100 lists, great. More discovery of new and interesting people for everyone involved. The following is our quick and dirty analysis of the nominations.

#HIT100 Twitter Accounts
@womenofteal
@wareFLO
@vishnu_saxena
@VinceKuraitis
@VictorHSW
@ukpenguin
@tweettiwoo
@Tony_PharmD
@TextraHealth
@techguy
@stacygoebel
@smithhazelann
@ShimCode
@ShereesePubHlth
@SeanSaid_
@sarahbennight
@rtoleti
@Resultant
@Respond_Rescue
@ReginaHolliday
@realHayman
@RBlount
@RasuShrestha
@R1chardatron
@PointonChris
@PharmacyPodcast
@PharmacyEdge1
@PatientVoices
@pat_health
@orpyxinc
@nrip
@nmanaloto
@nickisnpdx
@natarpr
@NaomiFried
@MMaxwellStroud
@mloxton
@mikebiselli
@MichelleRKearns
@Michael81082
@MelSmithJones
@melissaxxmccool
@Matt_R_Fisher
@markwattscra
@maria_quinlan
@marcus_baw
@MandiBPro
@lynnvos
@Lygeia
@LouiseGeraghty5
@lisadbudzinski
@klrogers5
@KenRayTaylor
@JWarbington
@justaskjul
@jotaelecruz
@JoinAPPA
@JohnNosta
@JoeBabaian
@Joan_JJ_Mc
@Jim_Rawson_MD
@JennDennard
@JBBC
@jaredpiano
@janicemccallum
@JamieJay2
@jameyedwards
@jamesfreed5
@innonurse
@healthythinker
@HealthData4All
@HealthcareWen
@gnayyar
@ginaman2
@GilmerHealthLaw
@GeriLynn
@ErinLAlbert
@endocrine_witch
@EMRAnswers
@ElinSilveous
@ebukstel
@DrTylerDalton
@drstclaire
@drnic1
@drlfarrell
@DmitriWall
@dirkstanley
@dflee30
@dchou1107
@dandunlop
@CTrappe
@Colin_Hung
@CoherenceMed
@CancerGeek
@burtrosen
@BunnyEllerin
@btrfly12
@Brian_Eastwood
@Brad_Justus
@billesslinger
@BGerleman
@BFMack
@BarbyIngle
@AllanVafi
@AinemCarroll
@ahier
@2healthguru
@_FaceSA

A big thank you to everyone who participated in the #HIT100 this year. Let’s keep sharing the good and showing appreciation for the people who influence our life for good.

Past #HIT100 Lists:
2016 #HIT100
2015 #HIT100
2014 #HIT100
2013 #HIT100
2012 #HIT100
2011 #HIT100

Despite Abundance of Threats, Few Providers Take Serious Steps To Protect Their Data

Posted on July 27, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I scarcely need to remind readers of the immensity of the threats to healthcare data security out there. Not only is healthcare data an attractive target for cybercriminals, the aforementioned keep coming up with new ways to torture security pros (the particularly evil ransomware comes to mind).

Unfortunately, healthcare organizations are also notorious for spending too little on data security. Apparently, this also extends to spending money on information security governance or risk management, according to a new study.

The study is sponsored by Netwrix Corp., which sells a visibility platform for data security and risk mitigation and hybrid environments.  (In other words, the following stats are interesting, but keep your bias alert on.)

Researchers found that 95% of responding healthcare organizations don’t use software for information security governance or risk management and that just 31% of respondents said they were well prepared to address IT risks. Still, despite the prevalence of cybersecurity threats, 68% don’t have any staffers in place specifically to address them.

What’s the source of key IT healthcare security threats? Fifty-nine percent of healthcare organizations said they were struggling with malware, and 47% of providers said they’d faced security incidents caused by human error. Fifty-six percent of healthcare organizations saw employees as the biggest threat to system availability and security.

To tackle these problems, 56% of healthcare organizations said they plan to invest in security solutions to protect their data. Unfortunately, though, the majority said they lacked the budget (75%), time (75%) and senior management buy-in (44%) needed to improve their handling of such risks.

So it goes with healthcare security. Most of the industry seems willing to stash security spending needs under a rock until some major headline-grabbing incident happens. Then, it’s all with the apologies and the hand-wringing and the promise to do much better. My guess is that a good number of these organizations don’t do much to learn from their mistake, and instead throw some jerry-rigged patch in place that’s vulnerable to a new attack with new characteristics.

That being said, the study makes the important point that employees directly or indirectly cause many IT security problems. My sense is that the percent of employees actually packaging data or accessing it for malicious purposes is relatively small, but that major problems created by an “oops” are pretty common.

Perhaps the fact that employees are the source of many IT incidents is actually a hopeful trend. Even if an IT department doesn’t have the resources to invest in security experts or new technology, it can spearhead efforts to treat employees better on security issues. Virtually every employee that doesn’t specialize in IT could probably use a brush up on proper security hygiene, anyway. And retraining employees doesn’t call for a lot of funding or major C-suite buy-in.

Care Coordination Tech Still Needs Work

Posted on July 26, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Virtually all of you would agree that we’ll have to do a better job of care coordination if we hope to meet our patient outcomes goals. And logically enough, most of us are hoping that technology will help us make this happen.  But from what I’ve seen, it isn’t going to happen anytime soon.

Every now and then, I get a press release from a company that says a company’s tech has solved at least some part of the industry’s care coordination problem. Today, the company was featured in a release from Baylor College of Medicine, where a physician has launched a mobile software venture focused on preventing miscommunication between patient care team members.

The company, ConsultLink, has developed a mobile platform that manages patient handoffs, consults and care team collaboration. It was founded by Dr. Alexander Pastuszak, an assistant professor of urology at Baylor, in 2013.

As with every other digital care coordination platform I’ve heard about – and I’ve encountered at least a dozen – the ConsultLink platform seems to have some worthwhile features. I was especially interested in its analytics capability, as well as its partnership with Redox, an EMR integration firm which has gotten a lot of attention of late.

The thing is, I’ve heard all this before, in one form or another. I’m not suggesting that ConsultLink doesn’t have what it takes. However, it’s been my observation if market space attracts dozens of competitors, the very basics of how they should attack the problem are still up for grabs.

As I suspected it would, a casual Google search turned up several other interesting players, including:

  • ChartSpan Medical Technologies: The Greenville, South Carolina-based company has developed a platform which includes practice management software, mobile patient engagement and records management tools. It offers a chronic care management solution which is designed to coordinate care between all providers.
  • MyHealthDirect: Nashville’s MyHealthDirect, a relatively early entrant launched in 2006, describes itself as focusing consumer healthcare access solutions. Its version of digital care coordination includes online scheduling systems, referral management tools and event-driven analytics, which it delivers on behalf of health systems, providers and payers.
  • Spruce Health: Spruce Health, which is based in San Francisco, centralizes care communication around mobile devices. Its platform includes a shared inbox for all patient and team communication, collaborative messaging, telemedicine support and mobile payment options.

No doubt there are dozens more that aren’t as good at SEO. As these vendors compete, the template for a care coordination platform is evolving moment by moment. As with other tech niches, companies are jumping into the fray with technology perhaps designed for other purposes. Others are hoping to set a new standard for how care coordination platforms work. There’s nothing wrong with that, but its likely to keep the core feature set for digital coordination fluid for quite some time.

I don’t doubt among the companies I’ve described, there’s a lot of good and useful ideas. But to me, the fact that so many players are trying to define the concept of digital care coordination suggests that it has some growing up to do.

How Does Age Impact Patient Satisfaction & Provider Switching? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on July 25, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 7/28 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Lea Chatham (@leachatham) from @SolutionReach on the topic of “How Does Age Impact Patient Satisfaction & Provider Switching?.”

A new patient survey conducted by Solutionreach, looked at patient satisfaction, practice selection, practice switching, and communication preferences across three generations–baby boomers, Generation X, and millennials–and four practice types–primary care, dental, dermatology, and eye care.

Not surprisingly there were some striking differences between the generations. For example, baby boomers are much more satisfied with their providers than the other two generations. However, there were also some unexpected consistencies like a desire for more email and text communication across all generations.

The survey found that across all generations and all types of practices there is a significant amount of practice switching going on, probably more than ever before. In this #HITsm chat we’ll look at some of the data and what a few of the surprises were as well as some of the things providers should be thinking about if they want to retain and recruit patients in the different generations.

For more information on the Solution Reach survey mentioned above, check out their paper, news release, and these two blog posts.

Questions we will explore in this week’s #HITsm chat include:
T1: Baby boomers appear to be more satisfied with providers than other generations, what might be contributing to this? #HITsm

T2: Why are millennials and Gen Xers so much less satisfied with providers? #HITsm

T3: What are some of the key areas of low satisfaction across practices/generations? How do we fix it? #HITsm

T4: New data suggest liking your doctor isn’t enough anymore. What does it take to keep patients today? #HITsm

T5: Should practices start taking age into account for retention/recruitment of patients? How? #HITsm

Bonus: Should doctors be using tools like texting in day-to-day practice? Where and when? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
8/4 – Health IT Interoperability
Hosted by Alan Portela (@AlanWPortela) from Airstrip

8/11 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

8/18 – Diversity in HIT
Hosted by Jeanmarie Loria (@JeanmarieLoria) from @advizehealth

8/25 – TBD
Hosted by Greg Meyer (@Greg_Meyer93)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Hospitals Aren’t Getting Much ROI From RCM Technology

Posted on July 24, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

If your IT investments aren’t paying off, your revenue cycle management process is clunky and consumers are defaulting on their bills, you’re in a pretty rocky situation financially. Unfortunately, that’s just the position hospitals find themselves in lately, according to a new study.

The study, which was conducted by the Healthcare Financial Management Association and Navigant, surveyed 125 hospital health system chief financial officers and revenue cycle executives.

When they looked at the data, researchers saw that hospitals are being hit with a double whammy. On the one hand, the RCM systems hospitals have in place don’t seem to be cutting it, and on the other, the hospitals are struggling to collect from patients.

Nearly three out of four respondents said that their RCM technology budgets were increasing, with 32% reporting that they were increasing spending by 5% or more. Seventy-seven percent of hospitals with less than 100 beds and 78% of hospitals with 100 to 500 beds plan to increase such spending, the survey found.

The hospital leaders expect that technology investments will improve their RCM capabilities, with 79% considering business intelligence analytics, EHR-enabled workflow or reporting, revenue integrity, coding and physician/clinician documentation options.

Unfortunately, the software infrastructure underneath these apps isn’t performing as well as they’d like. Fifty-one percent of respondents said that their organizations had trouble keeping up with EHR upgrades, or weren’t getting the most out of functional, workflow and reporting improvements. Given these obstacles, which limit hospitals’ overall tech capabilities, these execs have little chance of seeing much ROI from RCM investments.

Not only that, CFOs and RCM leaders weren’t sure how much impact existing technology was having on their organizations. In fact, 41% said they didn’t have methods in place to track how effective their technology enhancements have been.

To address RCM issues, hospital leaders are looking beyond technology. Some said they were tightening up their revenue integrity process, which is designed to ensure that coding and charge capture processes work well and pricing for services is reasonable. Such programs are designed to support reliable financial reporting and efficient operations.

Forty-four percent of respondents said their organizations had established revenue integrity programs, and 22% said revenue integrity was a top RCM focus area for the coming year. Meanwhile, execs whose organizations already had revenue integrity programs in place said that the programs offered significant benefits, including increased net collections (68%), greater charge capture (61%) and reduced compliance risks (61%).

Still, even if a hospital has its RCM house in order, that’s far from the only revenue drain it’s likely to face. More than 90% of respondents think the steady increase in consumer responsibility for care will have an impact on their organizations, particularly rural hospital executives, the study found.

In effort to turn the tide, hospital financial execs are making it easier for consumers to pay their bills, with 93% of respondents offering an online payment portal and 63% rolling out cost-of-care estimation tools. But few hospitals are conducting sophisticated collections initiatives. Only 14% of respondents said they were using advanced modeling tools for predicting propensity to pay, researchers said.

Healthcare Cybersecurity Cartoon – Fun Friday

Posted on July 21, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week’s Fun Friday comes from the #IoMTchat (Internet of Medical Things) and was shared by Rasu Shrestha. This cartoon has so many good elements including the great password sticky note. As in most humor, this isn’t too far from the truth.

Rasu is spot on in his tweet too. Key to cybersecurity in healthcare is understanding employee behaviors and motivators. You’ll never change the culture and improve cybersecurity if you don’t understand your employees’ needs.

One Hospital Faces Rebuild After Brutal Cyberattack

Posted on July 20, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Countless businesses were hit hard by the recent Petya ransomware attack, but few as hard as Princeton, West Virginia-based Princeton Community Hospital. After struggling with the aftermath of the Petya attack, the hospital had to rebuild its entire network and reinstall its core systems.

The Petya assault, which hit in late June, pounded large firms across the globe, including Nuance, Merck, advertiser WPP, Danish shipping and transport firm Maersk and legal firm DLA Piper.  The list of Petya victims also includes PCH, a 267-bed facility based in the southern part of the state.

After the attack, IT staffers first concluded that the hospital had emerged from the attack relatively unscathed. Hospital leaders noted that they are continuing to provide all inpatient care and services, as well as all other patient care services such as surgeries, therapeutics, diagnostics, lab and radiology, but was experiencing some delays in processing radiology information for non-emergent patients. Also, for a while the hospital diverted all non-emergency ambulance visits away from its emergency department.

However, within a few days executives found that its IT troubles weren’t over. “Our data appears secure, intact, and not hacked into; yet we are unable to access the data from the old devices in the network,” said the hospital in a post on Facebook.

To recover from the Petya attack, PCH decided that it had to install 53 new computers throughout the hospital offering clean access to its Meditech EMR system, as well as installing new hard drives on all devices throughout the system and building out an entirely new network.

When you consider how much time its IT staff must’ve logged bringing basic systems online, rebuilding computers and network infrastructure, it seems clear that the hospital took a major financial blow when Petya hit.

Not only that, I have little doubt that PCH faces doubts in the community about its security.  Few patients understand much, if anything, about cyberattacks, but they do want to feel that their hospital has things under control. Having to admit that your network has been compromised isn’t good for business, even if much bigger companies in and outside the healthcare business were brought to the knees by the same attack. It may not be fair, but that’s the way it is.

That being said, PCH seems to have done a good job keeping the community it serves aware what was going on after the Petya dust settled. It also made the almost certainly painful decision to rebuild key IT assets relatively quickly, which might not have been feasible for a bigger organization.

All told, it seems that PCH survived Petya successfully as any other business might have, and better than some. Let’s hope the pace of global cyberattacks doesn’t speed up further. While PCH might have rebounded successfully after Petya, there’s only so much any hospital can take.

Simulation-Based Education: The New Paradigm in Healthcare Technology – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on July 19, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Heather Haugen, PhD, Managing Director and CEO at The Breakaway Group (A Conduent Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Heather Haugen
Imagine a warehouse filled with classroom training sessions running simultaneously, hotel lobbies packed with consultants checking in and out at the same time, overrun parking lots, buses shuttling employees off campus, and more. These are the harsh, yet common challenges healthcare organizations face with classroom training – a predicament explored in the second edition of Beyond Implementation: A Prescription for the Adoption of Healthcare Technology. As the book explores the real-life headaches of classroom training, it calls on healthcare leaders and organizations to embrace a new education paradigm.

Today the healthcare industry has made considerable advances in technology. Enterprise applications now offer more features and functionality than ever before. Analytics programs, telehealth platforms, mobile health applications – each represents one of the many innovations changing the face of our industry. Yet despite these advances, classroom training remains one feature that has yet to change, a feature deeply-engrained in the habits, mental models, and beliefs of the industry. Healthcare executives already face significant pressure from making multi-million-dollar investments in clinical information systems. Changing how users are educated disrupts another component of healthcare for which executives become solely responsible, and must address and manage.

Despite the strength of the status quo, Beyond Implementation calls for healthcare’s departure from the classroom training model, as research highlights its ineffectiveness for teaching learners how to use new technology – a reason why most industries have abandoned or redesigned the model. Instead of face-to-face instruction, the book recommends healthcare organizations take a simulation-based approach to education, which provides learners with hands-on experience completing their workflows in a simulated EHR. The value of simulation-based education was first proven in the commercial airline industry. Like healthcare today, the airline industry experienced significant disruption through technology as the industry transitioned from analog to flight control systems. Unable to educate pilots quickly enough, the industry developed flight simulators that provided hands-on training that was relevant, accessible, repeatable, and sustainable. The new education model produced impressive learning outcomes, which is why the book argues for a similar model to be applied to healthcare.

Unlike classroom training, simulation-based education is more personalized and targeted. Education is role-specific and teaches learners how to complete their daily tasks in a simulated EHR environment. Users learn to complete their daily tasks according to best practice workflows guided by real-life clinical scenarios that increase relevancy, retention, and engagement. One significant benefit is users accumulate experience in the application without risks to patient safety. They also access their education at a time most convenient to them, as education is accessible 24/7 anywhere there is an internet connection. The accessibility of simulation-based education eliminates the headaches and costs of renting out warehouses, hiring trainers and consultants, scheduling staff to attend three eight-hour training sessions, and more.  It’s no wonder why simulators are shown to improve confidence and knowledge in the system – which are key indicators of proficiency.

Considering the challenges and opportunities facing healthcare organizations, the need for a better education paradigm is apparent. Now more than ever, our industry is grappling with the challenges of swapping their legacy systems with new enterprise applications, which research has shown brings significantly greater challenges than the switch from paper to electronic. In addition to new strategies around leadership and other areas, organizations must provide education that helps users make the transition from old workflows, keyboard shortcuts, and habits more quickly and seamlessly. Our industry is also beginning to focus on improving outcomes through technology, a trend that requires organizations to create a workforce of proficient users efficiently and effectively.

In every aspect, healthcare stands to benefit by replacing its analog approach to education. Whether reducing costs or improving knowledge and confidence in the system, the argument for classroom training is obsolete. It’s time that our industry embrace a new model that reflects the level of innovation healthcare leaders and professionals are working so hard to adopt.

Conduent is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts. The Breakaway Group is a leader in EHR and Health IT training. Download their Free Whitepaper “Leadership Insights: Gaining Value from Technology Investments.”

Meeting the Patient Where They Are – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on July 18, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 7/21 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Melody Smith Jones (@MelSmithJones) from HYP3R on the topic of “Meeting the Patient Where They Are.”

Every day, decision-makers across the healthcare industry sit in boardrooms charting the course for the future of patient engagement.

At the same time, individual patients are turning to new sources for health information, researching symptoms online and crowdsourcing answers from friends on social media.

More than ever, healthcare providers need to meet patients where they are.

Join this Twitter chat to explore how healthcare decision-makers can get out of the confines of the boardroom and truly understand the patient experience of today.

Questions we will explore in this week’s #HITsm chat include:
T1: As the healthcare consumer turns away from traditional media & towards digital channels, how can we meet the patient where they are? #HITsm

T2: Since financial literacy and price transparency have a steep learning curve, how can we meet the patient where they are? #HITsm

T3: As healthcare consumers continue to become avid researchers in their own right, how can we meet the patient where they are? #HITsm

T4: As the patient stares blankly at the available patient portal, how can we meet the patient where they are? #HITsm

T5: As patients and families bring digital devices with them into the care setting, how can we meet the patient where they are? #HITsm

Bonus: As the worlds of social media and intelligence continue to merge, how can we meet the patient where they are? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
7/28 – How Does Age Impact Patient Satisfaction & Provider Switching?
Hosted by Lea Chatham (@leachatham) from @SolutionReach

8/4 – TBD
Hosted by Alan Portela (@AlanWPortela) from Airstrip

8/11 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

8/18 – Diversity in HIT
Hosted by Jeanmarie Loria (@JeanmarieLoria) from @advizehealth

8/25 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.