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Interoperability versus Usability in Best of Breed or All-in-One HIS Systems

Posted on January 31, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a number of my online conversations we’ve been having really in depth discussions about the idea of whether it’s better for a hospital HIS system is better as an All-In-One system or whether Best of Breed healthcare IT systems are better. Much of this discussion has been sparked from posts done on my Hospital EMR and EHR blog. So, if you’re in the hospital space and are not following that site, you should. You can even sign up for the Hospital EMR and EHR list if you’d like. Anne Zieger writes most of the content there and she doesn’t mince words.

In all of these discussions, something became really clear to me:

The best reason to use Best of Breed healthcare IT systems is for usability.

The best reason to use an All-in-One system is for interoperability.

Some people may see this as too simplistic, but I loved a quote I read recently that said you don’t truly understand something until you can describe it in a simple form. I actually heard Bill Belichick do this talking about what he looks for in receivers for his Football team (Anyone excited for Super Bowl Sunday?). He said he likes a receiver that can Get Open and Catches the Ball. Seems far too simplistic, but it’s so simplistic it’s genius.

I think the same could be said for evaluating hospital IT systems:

The thing I like most in a healthcare IT system is one that’s Usable and Integrates Well.

Meaningful Use Appeals Process – Meaningful Use Monday

Posted on January 30, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you are on of the 355 Eligible Providers who unsuccessfully attested to MU last year, CMS now offers an appeals process for both the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Here’s the section on appeals for EHR Incentive programs:

Starting December 1, 2011, CMS is accepting appeals for eligible professionals and eligible hospitals.

For general questions and for information on how to file an appeal, eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, critical access hospitals, Medicare Advantage Organizations, and Medicaid eligible hospitals may contact OCSQ’s designated appeal support contractor via the toll free number between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday or via email.

1. Toll-free number: 855-796-1515
2. Email: OCSQAppeals@provider-resources.com

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), Office of Clinical Standards and Quality (OCSQ) is providing guidance on how to file an appeal.

If you click through to the How to File an Appeal link, it says that the final rule provides guidance and requirements for a Medicaid appeals process, but does not provide an appeals process for the Medicare EHR Incentive program. Although it also says that “CMS is currently implementing an appeals process for the EHR Incentive Program.”

It does also say that Provider Resources, Inc. (PRI) located in Erie, Pennsylvania was awarded the contract to handle the appeals process with the Office of Clinical Standards and Quality (OCSQ) overseeing the EHR incentive appeals process. Otherwise, it’s still pretty vague on the exact details of the appeals process other than the contact info.

I’ve read that beginning in February, appeal decisions will be posted on CMS’s Website under the Office of Clinical Standards and Quality. I hope that there’s some really good transparency in these postings so that those attesting to meaningful use in the future will be able to learn from people’s past mistakes.

If you’re someone that was denied and is going through the appeals process, I’d be interested to hear about your experience so we can share it with others that will need to do the same.

Kaiser’s Mobile App, EHR Anxiety Coding, EHR Accessibility Challenge and EHR Design

Posted on January 29, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re back with our weekend round up of interesting tweets from the Twittersphere. We’ve got some really interesting ones to consider this week. So, much is happening in healthcare IT. Hopefully I can provide a good insight to some of the trends that are most interesting. No doubt this will be a challenge as we head into what is one of the most busy healthcare IT news cycles of the year around HIMSS.

Now, on to the various EHR and Healthcare IT tweets:


Kaiser Permanente just made 9 Million EHR records available on line to the patients. That’s definitely worth talking about. Go read about it in Jennifer’s post.

This tweet just made me laugh (although, if you’re experiencing it, it’s not that funny):


I think they probably need a DSM-IV code.


I know there are a number of companies working on this. The problem isn’t the technology to get the Qcode to access your patient record. It’s aggregating your patient record in some place so that it’s accessible. That’s going to take a long time (if ever) to get it all connected.


I’m fascinated by this idea as well. I hope some companies will take it really seriously. The interesting thing is that often by making software accessible, you also learn a lot about how you can simplify the software.


Dr. Rick does a great job starting the conversation around EHR usability. I can’t imagine the effort he put in just to create the first post. Of course, it is a first offering, but I’m really glad that he’s started a deeper discussion around EHR usability. My only disappointment is that he isn’t posting them on one of my sites instead of HIStalk. Regardless, by the looks of the discussion in that post it’s going to drive some really interesting conversation that will hopefully result in improved EHR design.

Social Media ROI for Doctors

Posted on January 27, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m a huge fan of social media and the power that it has for people to connect with other people. What I haven’t quite figured out is how doctors should best use social media for their practice. Although, this article about the ROI of Social Media for Doctors has me thinking. Here’s some relevant quotes they posted about the subject:
“As many as a third of my patients are coming from social media,” Jerath said. (Source: 9News)

“[Dr. Zaid] estimates that his “digital footprint” — his online presence — adds $125,000 to his annual practice revenue.”(Source: Physicians Practice)
“The percent of new patients reporting that they “found” [Dr. Faust] online now varies between 30 percent and 50 percent.” (Source: Physicans Practice)

“I average 1 new patient family per week who came because of our social media presence (equals $140k added income per year)” – Dr. Burgert (Source: KevinMD.com)

“Investing time in relevant and complete posts actually saves me time in the long run.” -Dr. Burgert (Source: KevinMD.com)

One thing I’m certain of: There is a potential ROI available for physicians using social media. The above quotes remind me of this possibility.

The problem is that there are at least two major challenges to use of social media: The Social Media Black Hole and Privacy-Security.

The Social Media Black Hole
While there’s great potential in using social media to drive patients to your practice, there’s also great potential that you’ll pump a bunch of time and/or money into social media and get nothing in return. The social media black hole will open up and take whatever time and money you are willing to put into it and may or may not yield results.

One challenge I see is that most doctors are willing to spend money, but not time on social media. While this can work if done correctly, most social media is best done by having an authentic voice. Paying someone to be an authentic voice for you is quite a challenge. So, for a clinical practice to do well in social media, I argue that you need to have you and your staff carve out time to engage with it. Once you’re engaging with it, then there are some paid social media opportunities that can benefit you.

How then do you avoid spending a bunch of time on social media which ends up in the social media black hole with no results?

My biggest suggestion is to start off with smaller, more reasonable expectations. Instead of diving into social media with the expectation of finding more patients, choose a lesser goal which will lead you to the larger goal. For example, just start by interacting with other people from your area on Twitter. That’s right, just start by being social with people that you find interesting in the space that you care about. If you want more patients down the road, then talk with people about the local sports team or local news. If you want to learn more, find doctors from the specialty you serve and interact with them. If your Twitter account is @VegasDoc or @VegasChiropractor, then you have a built in advertisement every time you tweet regardless of what you tweet. Add in a short description of what you do in your profile and you have another ad.

I’m sure many of you are wondering how you find people in your local area or that tweet about topics you care about. That’s simple. Twitter has this great Advanced Search feature (although many don’t know how to get to it) where you can search and find people. Search by location and/or search term and start engaging people. Don’t start with the sales pitch. Start with adding value to the person you find that’s interesting on Twitter. Answer their question. Give them a compliment for something good they offer. Ask them a question. Just be authentic in your interactions. Relationship first! Sale second!

I, nor any other social media person, can really tell you what serendipitous occurrences will happen that will bring patients to your office. However, the same could be said for how half of your patients found your office. By starting off with just interacting with people that you find interesting, whether you get patients from it or not doesn’t matter since you’re just having a good time online. Although, over time, don’t be surprised by the unexpected benefits you receive from those interactions.

Healthcare Social Media Privacy and Security
Yes, I’m already bracing for the privacy and security people to come knocking on this post. That’s fine with me. I appreciate people who make us aware of possible privacy and security issues. No doubt there are serious potential HIPAA risks related to the use of social media in healthcare. My best advice is: Be Careful and Don’t Be Stupd (This is an example of Healthcare Social Media Stupid in case you missed it).

However, if you read my suggestions above, you’ll notice that I didn’t suggest really talking about healthcare on social media. If you find someone from your local area talking about the local sports team and you talk about your local sports team with them, where’s the privacy and security risk? If they ask you medical questions, then they’re the ones that put that information on there and consented for it to be on there. Just create a pat answer, “I don’t discuss healthcare issues on social media, but I’d be happy to talk with you about them in my office. Call for an appt: 555-5555” You could even include something like it in your profile description if you wanted.

My point is that there are a lot of ways to use social media without violating privacy. Be careful and thoughtful about what you do.

Social Media Discovery
Of course, these are just a couple suggestions off the top of my head. What’s so great about social media is that as you use it and interact with people regularly, you’ll discover untold ways to benefit from social media. Plus, you’ll find new ways to accomplish things you never would have thought possible. That’s part of why you have to dive in and start interacting. Until you do, you won’t learn which parts are most valuable.

Social Media Not For Everyone
I’m not going to sit here and argue that everyone should be part of social media. Everyone isn’t social in their daily life, so there are certainly many that won’t want to be social online either. Although, I bet in every office there’s someone who would enjoy being the social face for your office.

Certainly there were plenty of practices that did just fine without advertising on TV, the newspaper, the yellow pages, etc. Many practices will do just fine without social media. However, you can be sure that many practices of the future will find tremendous benefit and advantages from their use of social media.

I can speak from this personally. Once you’ve built a social media following. It’s amazing the number of unique ways you can use it for good. My only regret has been that I sometimes wished I’d used it more and earlier.

GE Centricity Advance Ceasing Operations

Posted on January 26, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday I had the opportunity to talk with the people from GE who briefed me that GE is in the process of shutting down their GE Centricity Advance product line. This was pretty big news to me since I remember just last year at HIMSS meeting with GE and hearing that for the small practice (I believe 1-10 docs) GE Centricity Advance was where they were putting all their effort. You could see the energy they had behind it. In fact, their iPad EHR app was built on top of the GE Centricity Advance solution (which is now being moved to their other EHR product lines).

You might remember that the GE Centricity Advance solution was actually created out of the purchase of MedPlexus in March 2010. At the time, MedPlexus had 100 employees out of California with the development team out of India. At the time of purchase it seemed GE’s acquisition would provide a SaaS based EHR option to the independent physician market. Plus, MedPlexus (which became GE Centricity Advance) also provided an integrated Practice Management System with the EHR.

The GE Centricity Advance website is already forwarding to the Centricity Practice Solution website and a letter was sent out to all Centricity Advance customers informing them that the product line was ceasing operation. I’ve asked for a copy of that letter and if I get it, I’ll add it to this post (or if you’re a customer that received it and doesn’t mind sharing we’d welcome it).

I was told that GE is offering Centricty Advance users a free transfer to their Centricity Practice Solution EHR software. From what they told me it seems this will include data migration, training on the new system and a license for Centricity Practice Solution. Of course, Centricity Advance was paid on a subscription model so they’ll have to continue paying the monthly fee. As with most data migrations, I don’t think we’ll know how good GE is at migrating the data from GE Centricity Advance to Centricity Practice Solution until they start to do them.

Since both Centricity Advance and Centricity Practice Solution have ONC-ATCB complete EHR certification, there shouldn’t be any problems for those that transfer to Centricity Practice Solution when it comes to EHR stimulus money. Those not wanting to move to the Centricity Practice Solution will have this as part of their decision on what to do once Centricity Advance is no longer supported. I expect there will be many in this situation since while Centricity Practice Solution is available through GE’s partners as a “SaaS” offering, I think many will want to find a true from the ground up web based SaaS EHR offering.

I asked how many providers would be effected by the end of the Centricity Advance product line, but it’s GE’s policy to not comment on those numbers.

Where does this leave GE Centricity EMR software?
GE Healthcare IT still does a couple billion dollars of business and still has three EMR software offerings:
*Centricity Practice Solution – The replacement for Centricity Advance and will be GE’s EMR offering for the 1-100 provider practices.
*Centricity EMR – Still ambulatory EMR, but for the 100+ provider practices.
*Centricity Enterprise – Acute care EMR

I’m sure that many will wonder how good the Centricity Practice Solution will do in the small practice arena. Will this basically mean that GE is no longer a player in the small 1-10 provider practices? It’s hard to say for sure, but I’ll be interested to see how the Centricity Practice Solution EHR does in this market. There must have been a reason they purchased what became Centricity Advance instead of going with Centricity Practice Solution in the first place.

On the other hand, I could see people making the argument that this is a sound strategy by GE since movements like accountable care organizations (ACO’s) and related initiatives are putting the small practice in jeopardy. We know that many hospital systems are purchasing up group practices as they prepare to become an ACO among other reasons. While we still have many small group practices, it’s worth considering how many of them will survive the changing landscape. If not many survive, then this strategy by GE could end well for them. Although, I personally believe that practice consolidation is cyclical and so I’m not ready to announce the death of small group practices yet.

Another trend that might make this a good decision on GE’s part is what I call the Smart EHR. Our current phase of EHR adoption is basically converting paper to electronic. Once doctors start requiring EHR software to do things far more advanced (see Artificial Intelligence and Genomics EHR), it will require a new kind of EHR. Maybe Centricity Advance wasn’t prepared to make this shift. We’ll see if GE’s other EHR software is ready for it.

Many have argued that EHR consolidation is inevitable. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised that part of that EHR consolidation is happening within the same EHR company. I’m sure there are more on the way as we see which EHR companies survive the meaningful use winter and come out on the other side and which EHR companies close up shop.

Update: I asked GE for some more clarification on when GE Centricity Advance would be sunset and which data they’ll be migrating as part of the data migration process. Here are their answers:
Sunset Period: We have announced that we will cease operations of Centricity Advance on June 30, 2012. The data will be available in read-only mode until December 31, 2012.

Data Migration: We are working with our partners and customers to figure out the best way to migrate data. We have told customers that we will migrate the following data:
a. Patient Demographics, Patient Insurance data, Fee Schedules, Appointments
b. Patient Summary
c. Patient chart
We will migrate all clinical data. We are working with our partners to determine which financial information should be automatically migrated.

Real-Time Analytics and Dashboards for Streamlining Revenue Cycle Automation

Posted on January 25, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last month CareCloud announced a new real-time analytics dashboard to help doctor streamline revenue cycle automation. The core of their product is what they call CareCloud Analytics. As I think about the announcement, I wondered if it was really a big deal or not and why we hadn’t seen more of this in the various practice management systems and EHR software on the market today.

Is Data Analytics important in Healthcare?
I think this type of information is a big deal. Information is power and this is never more true than in healthcare. The press release does a great job of describing how real-time analytics and dashboards provide information which provides transparency and accountability to a practice. One quote from the article says, “The practice can now manage the productivity of the office staff, monitor in real time the productivity of billers, and gain transparency into the business side of operations to help form better decisions through data, instead of intuition.”

I’m a huge fan of analytics in my business. I call myself a stats addict. I have 2-3 stats programs running on my websites at all times. I get stats from my ad server, from Google’s ad server, and from every other stats engine I can find that has reliable data. Much of my success with my websites is because of my passion for knowing what’s happening with my websites. To me, Data is power! The same can be said for a practice. Data is the power to make important decisions that are needed for the success of your practice.

Why don’t more EHR and PMS vendors provide these analytics?
I’m sure there are a number of reasons why we don’t see real time analytics happening very often in the small practices. Hospitals are a bit different. There are whole companies devoted to just providing these types of services to hospitals that can pay for a full scale data warehouse environment to provide this type of data. A hospital that doesn’t do this type of data mining is missing out as well, but they have a number of options. Although, I don’t think many hospital HIS vendors offer this info by default.

The key reason I think real-time analytics and customizable dashboards are missing in the small practice environment has to do with doctors demand (or lack thereof) for such a feature. This will surprise some, but most will agree that the majority of doctors don’t care much for the business side of the practice. Sure, they care that the business side of the practice effects how much money they take home at the end of the day, but a large portion of doctors would love their lives a lot more if they didn’t have anything to do with the business of a practice. Yes, I know there are exceptions to this, but most doctors want to practice medicine not business.

With this as background, if you ask most doctors what they want from their EHR and Practice Management software, they’ll start to list off all of the clinical and workflow needs that they have. Very few of them will even venture into the business requests like real time analytics. Plus, even if they did venture into the business side of things, would they know how to request such a feature?

EHR and Practice Management Vendors have to show them why it matters to have these real time analytics. It reminds me of the famous quote attributed to Henry Ford. “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.” This can often be taken too far, but I think it applies well when it comes to things like real-time analytics of a practice.

One other reason that a number of companies are missing the analytics and its relationship with revenue cycle management is that they’re too focused on EHR. Many just consider the PMS a standard thing that everyone has already and that there’s no room to innovate. Last I checked meaningful use didn’t have any practice management elements and that’s taken up at least one development cycle for most companies. Too many doctors later dismay, the EHR selection process often puts the practice management side of the puzzle on the backseat. This is a mistake that many practices are paying for today.

As one PR rep for a major EHR company said to me, “Revenue Cycle Management isn’t sexy.” Although, she said this directly after telling me how beneficial it was to their bottom line.

Patients Medical Record Posted to Facebook – HIPAA Violation

Posted on January 24, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve generally been writing more about the EMR side of EMR and HIPAA lately. For the most part, it seems readers are more interested in EMR and EHR than they are in the details of HIPAA. Although, one of my top posts ever is from back in 2006 about HIPAA Privacy Examples and HIPAA Lawsuits. It seems that people are most interested in HIPAA when it has something to do with a HIPAA violation or lawsuit.

Today’s HIPAA violation could very likely become a HIPAA lawsuit. Plus, it is a word of caution to those about training your staff on HIPAA requirements and also on proper use of social media in healthcare.

Anne Steciw posted about the violation on Search Health IT. Here’s an excerpt from her post:

Details of the health data breach provided by the Los Angeles Daily News indicate that the employee, who was provided by a staffing agency, shared a photo on his Facebook page of a medical record displaying a patient’s full name and date of admission. The employee appeared to be completely ignorant of HIPAA laws.

I’m sure every hospital and healthcare administrator is cringing at this. I’m sure many could share stories of HIPAA issues related with staffing agencies as well. Although, it’s really hard for me to understand how someone even from a staffing agency could be so ignorant to the HIPAA laws. I’m not overstating how ignorant this person was in this situation. The above article explains something even more outrageous and unbelievable:

Even after being told by other posters that he was violating the patient’s privacy, the employee argued: “People, it’s just Facebook…Not reality. Hello? Again…It’s just a name out of millions and millions of names. If some people can’t appreciate my humor than tough. And if you don’t like it too bad because it’s my wall and I’ll post what I want to. Cheers!”

To me this is totally mind boggling. I’m sure many will argue that this person was exhibiting many of the characteristics of the Facebook generation of users. That’s a cop out and an excuse, but does make a larger point that many of the next generation have these outlandish views of what’s theirs and what’s ok and reasonable. Sadly, far too many people think when it’s humor it’s ok to do anything. It’s not and I’m sure those dealing with HIPAA violations won’t find it a reasonable excuse either.

One thing I really hate about stories like this is that they give a bad name to use of social media in healthcare. Social media is like most things which can be used for good or bad. It’s a shame if incidents like this discourage people from accessing the benefits of social media.

This is another good example of how our biggest HIPAA privacy vulnerability is people.

ePrescribing in 2012: Keep On G-Coding – Meaningful Use Monday

Posted on January 23, 2012 I Written By

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money.

Lynn Scheps is Vice President, Government Affairs at EHR vendor SRSsoft. In this role, Lynn has been a Voice of Physicians and SRSsoft users in Washington during the formulation of the meaningful use criteria. Lynn is currently working to assist SRSsoft users interested in showing meaningful use and receiving the EHR incentive money. Check out Lynn’s previous Meaningful Use Monday posts.

Many physicians will be pursuing EHR incentives in 2012. Because meaningful use is not dependent upon G-codes, providers have been asking whether they need to continue putting “G-8553” on Medicare claims. The answer is YES—keep on G-Coding! 

Even though physicians who receive a Medicare EHR incentive are ineligible for an ePrescribing (MIPPA) incentive, they are still subject to future ePrescribing penalties. These penalties can be avoided by ePrescribing in 2012:

  • Prevent the 2013 (1.5%) penalty – CMS is giving providers a second chance. If you failed to ePrescribe on the minimum 25 Medicare encounters in 2011, (which would have already protected you from the 2013 penalty), report G-8553 10 times between January 1 and June 30, 2012 on any Medicare claims. These claims don’t even have to be for the specified CPT “denominator” codes.
  • Prevent the 2014 (2%) penalty – Report the G-code 25 times between January 1 and December 31, 2012. These claims must be associated with the specified CPT codes (typically E&M visits). 

If you are not pursuing meaningful use in 2012—or if you are, but for some reason fail to earn the incentive this year—you can still earn a 1% ePrescribing bonus under MIPPA if you report the G-Code on claims with the specified CPT codes 25 times between January and December . 

Like last year, there will be a process for requesting an exemption from the 2013 penalties, but surprisingly, the Proposed Rule did not include earning an EHR incentive as one of the justifications.

Edible Microchip Tracking Device, AAYUWIZ EHR, and EMR + Analytics

Posted on January 22, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most regular readers know, on the weekend I’ve been doing a weekly Twitter round up of interesting tweets about EMR and EHR. Well, this week I came across all sorts of odd tweets. Also, it seems that someone with EMR in their Twitter name has been talking about the Giants making it to the Super Bowl. On that note, I’m not sure I really care whether the Giants or the Patriots win the Super Bowl. Although, I think it will be a fun game to watch. Push came to shove, I’ll take the Giants defense for the win. Enough football, back to the health IT and EMR talk.

This tweet is going to blow your socks off a little bit. We all know this type of technology is coming, but it’s crazy to think that it’s actually starting to be done. I might have to do a full post on this type of technology later:


For those who didn’t go read the article, it talks about an edible microchip that reports patient compliance with medication. Seems a bit extreme no? It’s still quite a ways off, but is interesting to consider.

This next tweet is fascinating and the landing page it goes to is even more fascinating. Mostly because the tweet and landing page feel more like spam than they feel like a legitimate company. So, tread lightly if you click:


As best I can tell this is a legitimate company. Although, I can’t understand why someone would think naming EMR software AAYUWIZ. Really? You’ve got to be able to do better than that. This looks like one of the MANY (and I mean many) EHR software that have been developed by Indian companies.

I don’t know the entire process these companies go through, but so many of these Indian (and probably other countries as well, but all the ones I’ve seen have been from India) development houses see an opportunity to create EHR software. After developing the EHR software, they reach out to people like myself asking for help on bringing their EHR software to America. Seems like a really risky business model to me. At least a couple of them do have Indian healthcare strategies as well, but many seem to be solely focused on the US market with no way of actually entering the market.


I like this idea. In fact, I’m a little surprised that I haven’t seen anyone do this before. What kills me is that there are probably 100-200 projects like it in healthcare that could benefit from better use of technology, but for one reason or another we haven’t gotten to it…yet(?). Seems like Lawrence Lin is working on it. Too bad he’s working in China, but from Nashville, TN. Now, I’ve got to meet Lawrence to hear his stories.

Modernizing Medicine’s Unique EHR User Interface

Posted on January 20, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’m always looking for something unique or different in the world of EHR software. I’m all about trying to find things that differentiate an EHR from other EHR vendors. I think I’ve found just that in the EHR interface for the Modernizing Medicine EHR software.

Modernizing Medicine currently focuses their EHR on two medical specialties: Dermatologists and Ophthalmologists. Their EHR is named EMA Dermatology and EMA Ophthalmology. Once you see the interface for their EHR, you’ll understand why it focuses on specialties like Dermatology and Ophthalmology. Plus, you’ll see why their next move should likely be into something like orthopedics.

Ok, enough background. I’ve had a bunch of the EHR Demo videos for Modernizing Medicine on our EMR and EHR Videos website. Here is the video of the simple Dermatology visit:

You can also check out the videos for the Complex Patient Visit and the Ludicrous Patient Visit.

I’ve seen a number of EHR companies incorporate images into their EHR. Most of them you can even do some sort of marking on top of the image. However, I don’t ever remember seeing an EHR that incorporated images the way that Modernizing Medicine did in the above video. Plus, they even take the documentation done on the image and turn it into a patient note automatically.

Certainly this type of interface won’t work for every specialty. It makes sense for medical specialties where it’s very visual like dermatology (which is where they stated).

I’d be interested to hear what others think of this EHR interface. Are there any other EHR software out there that take a similar approach to documentation?