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Musings of an EMR Consultant To Be

Posted on September 28, 2006 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Wow, I can’t believe how time passes so quickly and you don’t realize that you haven’t blogged. Life is extra busy for me right now. I’m also currently considering a job in Fayetteville, Arkansas. It looks like a pretty good job opportunity, but there are a lot of factors to consider. Not the least of which is how quickly they want me in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

Well, I don’t know much about Fayetteville, but one interesting part of the job is that they may want me to do consulting work on the side to keep me busy. I guess they are a small company and so they think that the IT needs won’t necessarily fill all of my time. In order to fill my time they are considering having me do EMR consulting for doctor’s offices in Fayetteville. Granted, I don’t know any doctors in Fayetteville or in all of Arkansas for that matter.

That could be a pretty large problem doing EMR consulting with no one to consult. I imagine someone reading this blog is from Northern Arkansas. Any doctors interested in having a fine young consultant help them out?

We’ll see what happens. There are still a lot of things that have to fall into place before I’d be doing EMR consulting or living in Arkansas, but the wheels have been set in motion. Don’t worry, regardless of what happens I’ll be working on this EMR and HIPAA blog for as long as I can stand to talk about EMR. EMR is revolutionary, important and interesting, so I don’t see myself stopping anytime soon.

Kevin Rollins Talks About EMR and RHIO at BYU’s Center for eBusiness

Posted on September 16, 2006 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The world is only beginning to see the far-reaching effects of Internet expansion in business and in every part of life, Kevin Rollins told the Center for eBusiness� advisory board.

BYU Center for eBusiness Newsletter

Kevin Rollins, CEO of Dell, talked to the BYU Center for eBusiness advisory board. I am a BYU fanatic. (If you don’t believe me then take a look at my BYU Sports Blog) The center for eBusiness is especially interesting to me. I think it’s a great idea for a University.

You can imagine my surprise when Kevin Rollins talked about the impact of EMR and RHIOs. Here’s an excerpt from the newsletter:

He also discussed some emerging Internet advances that are positively changing the medical field. Making health records available online will help medical professionals record treatments and assessments; it will allow doctors and facilities separated by thousands of miles to access patients� health records. Patients in turn will be able to compare and contrast hospitals and health care facilities across the nation to find the best fit for their needs. Currently, these advances are only being tested in highly populated cities. But expansion is both necessary and imminent.

�We just need more people experimenting and moving ahead on this so we have confidence that it will work,� he said.

I’m glad that someone understands the importance of EMR and RHIOs. One problem I see is that everyone is interested in the idea of EMR and exchanging patient records. However, not nearly enough doctors are implementing them. In an economic system, there has to be motivation for doctors to implement an EMR. Right now I don’t think those motivations are persuasive enough for doctors to implement an EMR. I hope this can change over time.

Creating a Dynamic Website for a Doctor’s Office

Posted on September 11, 2006 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Over at my other EMR home, EMRUpdate, I started a thread asking people about what technology they are using for their clinical website.

I am seriously looking for a way to create a website that can be easily updated using web based forms. I think I know what I basically want to do. It’s just knowing the best way to do it. Here are some of my goals:

-Templating (theme) Features – I should be able to change the entire website design in a click of a button
-Admin Pages – The doctor must be able to update and change all the content on the site
-General – It must be general enough that once created I could easily roll it out for a new doctor where they can just update with their content
-PHP and MySQL – These are my own personal preferences for coding
-Statistics – It must have a statistics package that can be built into the software
-Expandable – I should be able to upgrade and expand it quickly and easily (but the doctor doesn’t have to know how quickly and easily)

I honestly think what I’m talking about is more than possible using WordPress as a back end engine. However, DrM’s suggestion of using Joomla as the backend engine is quite intriguing. I already have one doctor’s office in mind for the website. Unfortunately, he’s not very good about deciding what content he would like on his website.

So, if there are any doctors reading this that are interested in working with me to create a website for them let me know. I’d have to charge something, but it would be more than reasonable.

No I’m not planning on making an EHR or patient portal. You might be able to integrate one of those into the website, but I’m talking about a website with information on your practice and possibly links to educational material.

Microsoft’s Acquisition of Azyxxi

Posted on September 4, 2006 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I mentioned in a previous post on Windows Vista’s Voice recognition that I needed to comment on Microsoft’s aquisition of Azyxxi showing their interest in entering into the Healthcare industry as a software provider. I still haven’t had much time to read abouy that Azyxxi is going to do for the healthcare industy. When I read the announcement of the purchase of Azyxxi and the following post by Dr. Bill Crounse (he works for Windows) on Health Blog, I made the following comment:

I agree that this is a very interesting play into HealthcareIT for Microsoft.

Neil Versel reported:
“”Microsoft sees it as applicable to clincians and integrated delivery networks, not just a hospital system,” Washington Hospital Center ED chair Mark Smith, M.D., said at a press teleconference this morning.”

One thing I don’t understand is how this is going to affect anyone but hospitals and large group practices. If it can’t apply to small practices then it won’t have nearly the effect on healthcare that people are describing.

Maybe you could help me understand how this will apply to the small doctors offices.

Dr. Bill Crounse responded:

First and foremost, the system was built by doctors, for doctors. While it does not replace existing HIS/CIS systems, it does make them more useful by freeing the data locked up in disparate systems. It provides clinicians with an intuitive, extremely responsive way to view patient data. It is truly a world-class iteration for the era of knowledge-driven healthcare.

To the extent that data can be normalized, assembled, and securely distributed via web services, clinicians in all kinds of settings large and small, will have access to information that has previously been unavailable or locked up in silos. Patients could benefit as such systems populate their personal health record. The scenario I envision isn’t all that different than the way my financial services institutions populate information in my brokerage or retirement accounts.

Granted, this must play out in stages and we have a lot of work to do. But I am hopeful that we are on the right course, for clinicians and the patients we care for.

I’m still not catching the vision of how Azyxxi works. It really sounds like this is only going to beneficial to hospitals. I guess I could see a doctor’s office possibly getting access to information about hospital visits aggregated using Azyxxi. However, I don’t think that is the intent of this product. Please correct me if I’m wrong. So far everything I’ve read has only deal in vague details about how Azyxxi is able to aggregate disparate data. This is much easier said than done. Let’s see what you’re talking about.

One comment that did catch my attention was by Mike C:

“1/8th of a second access time to data housed within a 13TB database though… that is quite impressive =)!”

Despite catching my attention I’m still not sure how this applies to a doctor’s office. A doctor with 13 TB’s of data has their scanner resolution set way too high.

I am interested in listening to the Microsoft and Azyxxi audio cast. I think I’ll download it to my iPod tomorrow.