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The Programmer – Healthcare Divide

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I’ve regularly seen the divide (sometimes really wide) between the programmer and technical people in an organization and the healthcare professionals. For example, a healthcare IT company recently emailed me about an issue they had with their main developer. They asked the insightful question, “Is it possible to find quality developers who are not, shall we say, “difficult”?”

There’s no simple answer to this question, but let me first suggest that this divide isn’t something that just happens between tech people and non-tech people. I’m sure many doctors feel the same way when dealing with other people who try and do their job. It turns out, people are hard to work with in general.

That disclaimer aside, tech people do like to think they’re in a tribe of their own. Check out this video which definitely comes from a programmer perspective and illustrates the divide that often exists.

Just the fact that the programmer feels like they’re considered a “code monkey” describes a major part of the issue. Much like I wrote about today on EMR and EHR, one of the keys is making a human connection as opposed to treating a programmer like a code monkey that’s just there to do your bidding. While there are exceptions, most people respond to someone who deeply cares about the individual and works to understand their needs as much as the project’s needs or their own needs.

The reason I think there’s usually a big divide between the healthcare people and the tech people is that it’s a real challenge for these two groups to connect. The healthcare people don’t want to talk about Battlestar Gallactica and Game of Thrones and the tech people don’t want to talk about Dancing with the Stars and The Voice. Yet, this is what needs to happen to build trust between the two different groups. It’s a rare breed that enjoys both.

If all of this fails, then try the nuclear option. Bring donuts. Most people can relate to donuts.

April 18, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Why Is It So Difficult To Reduce The Cost Of Care?

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By refusing to pay for readmissions within 30 days of discharge from a hospital, Medicare has sent a strong message across the healthcare industry: < 30 day readmissions should be avoided at all costs. As a result, providers and vendors are doing everything in their power to avoid < 30 day readmissions.

This seems like a simple way to reduce costs, right? Well, not quite…

The vast majority of costs of care delivery are fixed: capital expenditures, facilities and diagnostics, 24/7 staffing, administrative overhead, etc. In other words, it’s extremely expensive just to “keep the lights on.” There are some variable costs in healthcare delivery – such as medications and unnecessary tests – but the marginal costs of diagnostics and treatments are small relative to the enormous fixed costs of delivering care.

Thus, Medicare’s < 30 day readmission policy doesn’t really address the fundamental cost problem in healthcare. If costs were linearly bound by resource utilization, than reducing readmissions (and thus utilization) should lead to meaningful cost reduction. But given the reality of enormous fixed costs, it’s extremely difficult to move down the cost curve. To visualize:

Screenshot 2014-04-14 23.46.37

Medicare’s < 30 day readmission policy is a bandaid – not a cure – to the underlying cost problem. The policy, however, reduces Medicare’s outlays to providers. Rather than reduce (or expand, depending on your point of view) the size of the pie, Medicare has simply dictated that it will keep a larger share of the metaphorical pie for itself. Medicare is simply squeezing providers. One could argue that providers are bloated and that Medicare needs to squeeze providers to drive down costs. But this is intrinsically a superficial strategy, not a strategy that addresses the underlying cost problems in healthcare delivery.

So how can we actually address the fixed-cost problem of healthcare? Please leave a comment. Input is welcome.

April 17, 2014 I Written By

Kyle is Founder and CEO of Pristine, a company in Austin, TX that develops telehealth communication tools optimized for Google Glass in healthcare environments. Prior to founding Pristine, Kyle spent years developing, selling, and implementing electronic medical records (EMRs) into hospitals. He also writes for EMR and HIPAA, TechZulu, and Svbtle about the intersections of healthcare, technology, and business. All of his writing is reproduced at kylesamani.com

ICD-10 Flight Delayed, But Keep Your Bags Packed – Breakaway Thinking

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The following is a guest blog post by Jennifer Bergeron, Learning and Development Manager at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Jennifer_web

If you’ve ever traveled to a country that doesn’t speak your native tongue, you can appreciate the importance of basic communication. If you learn a second language to the degree that you’re adding nuance and colloquialisms, you’ve experienced how much easier it is to explain a point or to get answers you need. What if you’re expected to actually move to that foreign country under a strict timeline? The pressure is on to get up to speed. The same can be said for learning the detailed coding language of ICD-10.

The healthcare industry has been preparing in earnest to move from ICD-9 coding to the latest version of the international classification of diseases. People have been training, testing and updating information systems, essentially packing their bags to comply with the federal mandate to implement ICD-10 this October — but the trip was postponed. On April 1, President Barrack Obama signed into law a bill that includes an extension for converting to ICD-10 until at least Oct. 1, 2015. What does this mean for your ICD-10 travel plans?

Despite the unexpected delay, you’ll be living in ICD-10 country before you know it. With at least another year until the deadline, the timing is just right to start packing and hitting the books to learn the new codes and to prepare your systems. For those who have a head start, your time and focus has not gone to waste, so don’t throw your suitcases back into the closet. The planning, education and money involved in preparation for the ICD-10 transition doesn’t dissolve with the delay – you’ve collected valuable tools that will be put to use.

Although many people, including myself, are disappointed in the change, we need to continue making progress toward the conversion; learning and using ICD-10 will enable the United States to have more accurate, current and appropriate medical conversations with the rest of the world. Considering that it is almost four decades old, there is only so much communication that ICD-9 can handle; some categories are actually full as the number of new diagnoses continues to grow. ICD-9 uses three to five numeric characters for diagnosis coding, while ICD-10 uses three to seven alphanumeric characters. ICD-10 classifications will provide more specific information about medical conditions and procedures, allowing more depth and accuracy to conversations about a patient’s diagnosis and care.

Making the jump to ICD-10 fluency will be beneficial, albeit challenging. In order to study, understand and use ICD-10, healthcare organizations need to establish a learning system for their teams. The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, provides training for caregivers and coders that eases learning challenges, such as the expanded clinical documentation and new code set for ICD-10. Simply put, there are people can help with your entire ICD-10 travel itinerary, from creating a checklist of needs to planning a successful route.

ICD-10 is the international standard, so the journey from ICD-9 codes to ICD-10 codes will happen. Do not throw away your ICD-10 coding manuals and education materials just yet. All of these items will come in handy to reach the final destination: ICD-10.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

April 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Secure Text Messaging is Univerally Needed in Healthcare

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I’ve written regularly about the need for secure text messaging in healthcare. I can’t believe that it was two years ago that I wrote that Texting is Not HIPAA Secure. Traditional SMS texting on your cell phone is not HIPAA secure, but there are a whole lot of alternatives. In fact, in January I made the case for why even without HIPAA Secure Text Messaging was a much better alternative to SMS.

Those that know me (or read my byline at the end of each article) know that I’m totally bias on this front since I’m an adviser to secure text message company, docBeat. With that disclaimer, I encourage all of you to take a frank and objective look at the potential for HIPAA violations and the potential benefits of secure text over SMS and decide for yourself if there is value in these secure messaging services. This amazing potential is why I chose to support docBeat in the first place.

While I’ve found the secure messaging space really interesting, what I didn’t realize when I started helping docBeat was how many parts of the healthcare system could benefit from something as simple as a secure text message. When we first started talking about the secure text, we were completely focused on providers texting in ambulatory practices and hospitals. We quickly realized the value of secure texting with other members of the clinic or hospital organization like nurses, front desk staff, HIM, etc.

What’s been interesting in the evolution of docBeat was how many other parts of the healthcare system could benefit from a simple secure text message solution. Some of these areas include things like: long term care facilities, skilled nursing facilities, Quick Care, EDs, Radiology, Labs, rehabilitation centers, surgery centers, and more. This shouldn’t have been a surprise since the need to communicate healthcare information that includes PHI is universal and a simple text message is often the best way to do it.

The natural next extension for secure messaging is to connect it to patients. The beautiful part of secure text messaging apps like docBeat is that patients aren’t intimidated by a the messages they receive from docBeat. The same can’t be said for most patient portals which require all sorts of registration, logins, forms, etc. Every patient I know is happy to read a secure text message. I don’t know many that want to login to a portal.

Over the past couple years the secure text messaging tide has absolutely shifted and there’s now a land grab for organizations looking to implement some form of secure text messaging. In some ways it reminds me of the way organizations were adopting EHR software a few years back. However, we won’t need $36 billion to incentivize the adoption of secure text message. Instead, market pressures will make it happen naturally. Plus, with ICD-10 delayed another year, hopefully organizations will have time to focus on small but valuable projects like secure text messaging.

April 15, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Taking a Second Look: Accessing Your Data beyond the PM or EMR

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Editor’s Note: The following is an update to a previous EMR and HIPAA blog post titled “EMR Companies Holding Practice Data for “Ransom”.” In this update, James Summerlin (aka “JamesNT”) offers an update on EHR vendors willingness to let providers access their EHR data.

Over the years I have been approached with questions by several solo docs and medical groups about things such as the following:

  • Migrating to a different PM or EMR system.
  • Merging PM’s or EMR’s such as when a practice buys out another practice.
  • Interfacing the EMR and PM.
  • Custom reports.
  • More custom reports.
  • LOTS MORE CUSTOM REPORTS!!!

And there have been plenty of times I’ve had to give answers to those questions that were not favorable.  In many cases, it was with some online EMR or PM and the fact that I could not get to the database and the vendor refused to export a copy to me or the vendor wanted thousands of dollars for the export.  With the on-premises PM and EMR systems, getting to the data was a matter of working my way around whatever database was being used and figuring out what table had what data.  Although working with an on-premises PM or EMR may sound easier, it too often isn’t.  The on-premises guys have some tricks up their sleeves to keep you away from your data such as password protecting the database and, in some cases, flat out threatening legal action.

A few years back, I wrote a post on a forum about my thoughts on how once you entered your data into a PM or EMR, you may never get it back.  You can see John Lynn’s blog post on that here.

My being critical of EMR and PM software vendors is nothing new.  I’ve written several posts on forums and blogs, even articles in BC Advantage Magazine, about how hard it can be to deal with various EMR and PM systems.  Much of the, at times, downright contemptuous attitudes many PM and EMR vendors have towards their own clients can be very harmful.  Let’s consider three aspects:

  • Customization.  Most of the PM/EMR vendors out there would love to charge mega-bucks to write custom reports and so forth for clients.  However, this isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.  First, most clients simply aren’t going to pay the kind of money many PM or EMR companies want to charge.  Second, custom reports have to be maintained.  Eventually, you have all these clients running around needing changes to their reports and the PM or EMR vendor simply can’t get to them all in a timely manner without hiring lots of technical (read: EXPENSIVE) staff which turns what was once a money-making ordeal into a money losing one.  And, of course, the client’s suffer since they can’t fine-tune their practice to the degree needed in today’s challenging economy.
  • Interfacing.  What happens if a client wants to interface encounters and demographics from their EMR to their PM system and then interface dollar amounts and so forth from the PM system with receivables and expenditures in Quickbooks or other financial software into a series of reports that give a total view of how the practice is doing?  We are talking about the ability to, day-by-day, forecast incoming receivables from carriers and patient payments (within certain limits, of course), with expected expenditures (payroll, taxes, etc.) from the accounting software to get a financial outlook for the practice for the next few weeks or even months for long-term planning.  A PM or EMR vendor, already dealing with HIPAA or meaningful use, may not want to get involved in that kind of hard-core number crunching, yet the practice is demanding it.
  • A second part to interfacing.  Getting the EMR and PM vendors to get along.  Often what you see is the EMR vendor has a certain way they do an HL7 interface and the PM vendor has a certain way they do an HL7 interface and if they don’t line up properly, you’re just out of luck.  Either it works with reduced functionality or it doesn’t work at all and neither vendor will budge to change anything.  And that’s assuming they both use HL7!

In situations like those above, the best way to resolution is for the practice to perhaps obtain its own technical talent and build its own tools to extend the capabilities of the data contained within the various databases and repositories it may have such as the databases of the PM and EMR.  Unfortunately, as I have reported before, most PM and EMR systems lock up the practice’s data such that it is unobtainable.

At long last; however, there appears to be a light at the end of the tunnel that doesn’t sound like a train.  Some of the EMR systems that doctors use are beginning to realize that creating a turtle shell around a client’s data, in the long run, doesn’t do the client nor the PM/EMR vendor any good.  One such EMR I’ve been working with for a long time is Amazing Charts.  Amazing Charts has found itself in a very unique situation in that many of its clients are actually quite technical themselves or have no problem obtaining the technical talent they need to bend the different systems in their practices to their will.  The idea of having three or four databases, each being an island unto itself, is not acceptable to this adventurous lot.  They want all this data pooled together so they can make real business decisions.

Amazing Charts; therefore, has decided to be more open regarding data access.  Read only access to the Amazing Charts database is soon to be considered a given by the company itself.  Write access, of course, is another matter.  Clients will have to prove, and rightly so, that they won’t go spelunking through the database making changes that do little more than rack up tech-support calls.  Even with the caution placed on write access this is a far jump above and beyond the flat out “NO” any other company will give you for access to their database.  I consider this to be a great leap forward for Amazing Charts and, I’m certain, will set them apart from competition that still considers lock-in and a stand-offish attitude the way to treat clients who pay them a lot of money.

Perhaps one day other PM and EMR vendors will see the light and realize the data belongs to the practice, not the vendor, and will stop taking people’s stuff only to rent access to it back to them or withhold it altogether.  Until then, Amazing Charts seems to be leading the way.

April 14, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

You might be an #HITNerd If…

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You might be an #HITNerd If…

you can’t write your middle name in cursive, but you can touch type.

Find all our #HITNerd references on: EMR and EHR & EMR and HIPAA.

NEW: Check out the #HITNerd store to purchase an #HITNerd t-shirt of cell phone case.

Note: Much like Jeff Foxworthy is a redneck. I’m well aware that I’m an #HITNerd.

April 13, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Lack of 2014 Certified EHRs

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I was asked recently by an EHR vendor about the disconnect between the number of 2011 Certified EHR and the number of 2014 Certified EHR. I haven’t looked through the ONC-CHPL site recently, but you can easily run the number of certified EHR vendors there. Of course, there’s a major difference in the number of 2011 certified EHR versus 2014 certified EHR. However, I don’t think it’s for the reason most people give.

Every EHR vendor that gets 2014 Certified likes to proclaim that they’re one of the few EHR vendors that was “able” to get 2014 Certified. They like to point to the vast number of EHR that haven’t bridged from being 2011 Certified to being 2014 Certified as a sign that their company is special because they were able to complete the “more advanced” certification. While no one would argue that the 2014 Certification takes a lot more work, I think it’s misleading for EHR companies to proclaim themselves victor because they’re “one of the few” EHR vendors to be 2014 Certified.

First of all, there are over 1000 2014 Certified EHR products on ONC-CPHL as of today and hundreds of them (223 to be exact – 29 inpatient and 194 ambulatory) are even certified as complete EHR. Plus, I’ve heard from EHR vendors and certifying bodies that there’s often a delay in ONC putting the certified EHR up on ONC-CPHL. So, how many more are 2014 Certified that aren’t on the list…yet.

Another issue with this number is that there is still time for EHR vendors to finish their 2014 EHR certification. Yes, we’re getting close, but no doubt we’ll see a wave of last minute EHR certifications from EHR vendors. It’s kind of like many of you reading this that are sitting on your taxes and we’ll have a rush of tax filings in the next few days. It’s not a perfect comparison since EHR certification is more complex and there are a limited number of EHR Certification slots from the ONC-ATCB’s, but be sure there are some waiting until the last minute.

It’s also worth considering that I saw one report that talked about the hundreds (or it might have been thousands) of 2011 Certified EHR that never actually had any doctors attest using their software. If none of your users actually attested using your EHR software, then would it make any business sense to go after the 2014 EHR certification? We can be sure those will drop out, but I expect that a large majority of these aren’t really “EHR” software in the true sense. They’re likely modularly certified and add-ons to EHR software.

To date, I only know of one EHR software that’s comes out and shunned 2014 Certified EHR status. I’m sure we’ll see more than just this one before the deadline, but my guess is that 90% of the market (ie. actual EHR users) already have 2014 Certified EHR software available to them and 99% of the market will have 2014 certified EHR available if they want by the deadline.

I don’t think 2014 EHR certification is going to be a differentiating factor for any of the major EHR players. All the major players realize that being 2014 Certified is essential to their livelihood and a cost of doing business.

Of course, the same can’t be said for doctors. There are plenty of ways for doctors to stay in business while shunning 2014 Certified EHR software and meaningful use stage 2. I’m still really interested to see how that plays out.

April 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

EHR Adoption Failure Is Not Always a Technology Failure

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In one of the LinkedIn threads I was participating, Cameron Collette offered this really interesting insight:

Secondly, there is a general unwillingness to change current work flow models in many health care facilities. Daily I hear, “we have never done it that way” or “that’s not the way do things”. So, we have what is currently a greater than 40% EMR adoption failure rate. In other words, it is not always a technology failure. The technology might work, but in order to make it work properly requires a significant change in processes. Sometimes this would be a good thing. Sometimes it would not be a good thing as a lot of EMR/EHR designs were developed with virtually no real input from the people that have to work with them every day.

He’s absolutely right. It is very often the case that the problem with your EHR has nothing to do with the EHR technology at all. Often, one of the biggest problems that’s faced during an EHR implementation is a change to culture.

I’ve said multiple times that an EHR implementation requires change. I know that many EHR companies will try and sell you that their product can be implemented with no change to your workflow. That’s just an outright lie. Sure, some of them can do a pretty good job modeling your current workflow in the EHR, but there is still plenty of change that’s required.

Change and EHR implementation go together. Organizations that deny this reality have issues in their EHR implementation.

This is why every EHR implementation I’ve seen has required some powerful leadership that drives the initiative. It’s why the $36+ billion in stimulus money has driven EHR adoption so much. That money makes leaders respond.

My best advice for healthcare leaders out there is to embrace the change that EHR and other technology is bringing. You shouldn’t accept mediocrity in a tech system, but you should expect and be ready to change when you implement an EHR. In fact, one of the best assets you can build into your company is the ability to adapt to change.

5 years from now, I’m pretty sure we’re going to look back and think that the next 5 years of technology caused more change for good than we’ve seen in the last 10 years. If your organization doesn’t have a culture of adapting to change, they’re going to be left behind.

April 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.

Big Brother Or Best Friend?

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The premise of clinical decision support (CDS) is simple and powerful: humans can’t remember everything, so enter data into a computer and let the computer render judgement. So long as the data is accurate and the rules in the computer are valid, the computer will be correct the vast majority of the time.

CDS is commonly implemented in computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems across most order types – labs, drugs, radiology, and more. A simple example: most pediatric drugs require weight-based dosing. When physicians order drugs for pediatric patients using CPOE, the computer should validate the dose of the drug against the patient’s weight to ensure the dose is in the acceptable range. Given that the computer has all of the information necessary to calculate acceptable dose ranges, and the fact that it’s easy to accidently enter the wrong dose into the computer, CDS at the point of ordering delivers clear benefits.

The general notion of CDS – checking to make sure things are being done correctly – is the same fundamental principle behind checklists. In The Checklist Manifesto, Dr. Atul Gawande successfully argues that the challenge in medicine today is not in ignorance, but in execution. Checklists (whether paper or digital) and CDS are realizations of that reality.

CDS in CPOE works because physicians need to enter orders to do their job. But checklists aren’t as fundamentally necessary for any given procedure or action. The checklist can be skipped, and the provider can perform the procedure at hand. Thus, the fundamental problem with checklists are that they insert a layer of friction into workflows: running through the checklist. If checklists could be implemented seamlessly without introducing any additional workflow friction, they would be more widely adopted and adhered to. The basic problem is that people don’t want to go back to the same repetitive formula for tasks they feel comfortable performing. Given the tradeoff between patient safety and efficiency, checklists have only been seriously discussed in high acuity, high risk settings such as surgery and ICUs. It’s simply not practical to implement checklists for low risk procedures. But even in high acuity environments, many organizations continue to struggle implementing checklists.

So…. what if we could make checklists seamless? How could that even be done?

Looking at CPOE CDS as a foundation, there are two fundamental challenges: collecting data, and checking against rules.

Computers can already access EMRs to retrieve all sorts of information about the patient. But computers don’t yet have any ability to collect data about what providers are and aren’t physically doing at the point of are. Without knowing what’s physically happening, computers can’t present alerts based on skipped or incorrect steps of the checklist. The solution would likely be based on a Kinect-like system that can detect movements and actions. Once the computer knows what’s going on, it can cross reference what’s happening against what’s supposed to happen given the context of care delivery and issue alerts accordingly.

What’s described above is an extremely ambitious technical undertaking. It will take many years to get there. There are already a number of companies trying to addressing this in primitive forms: SwipeSense detects if providers clean their hands before seeing patients, and the CHARM system uses Kinect to detect hand movements and ensure surgeries are performed correctly.

These early examples are a harbinger of what’s to come. If preventable mistakes are the biggest killer within hospitals, hospitals need to implement systems to identify and prevent errors before they happen.

Let’s assume that the tech evolves for an omniscient benevolent computer that detects errors and issues warnings. Although this is clearly desirable for patients, what does this mean for providers? Will they become slaves to the computer? Providers already face challenges with CPOE alert fatigue. Just imagine do-anything alert fatigue.

There is an art to telling people that they’re wrong. In order to successfully prevent errors, computers will need to learn that art. Additionally, there must be a cultural shift to support the fact that when the computer speaks up, providers should listen. Many hospitals still struggle today with implementing checklists because of cultural issues. There will need to be a similar cultural shift to enable passive omniscient computers to identify errors and warn providers.

I’m not aware of any omniscient computers that watch people all day and warn them that they’re about to make a mistake. There could be such software for workers in nuclear power plants or other critical jobs in which the cost of being wrong is devastating. If you know of any such software, please leave a comment.

April 9, 2014 I Written By

Kyle is Founder and CEO of Pristine, a company in Austin, TX that develops telehealth communication tools optimized for Google Glass in healthcare environments. Prior to founding Pristine, Kyle spent years developing, selling, and implementing electronic medical records (EMRs) into hospitals. He also writes for EMR and HIPAA, TechZulu, and Svbtle about the intersections of healthcare, technology, and business. All of his writing is reproduced at kylesamani.com

Healthcare CIO Mindmap

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During HIMSS, Citius Tech put out this great image they called the Healthcare CIO Mindmap. It’s a beautiful display of everything that’s happening in healthcare IT. Although, it’s also an illustration of the challenge we and hospital CIOs face. Is it any wonder that so many hospital CIOs feel overwhelmed?

Enjoy the Healthcare CIO Mindmap in all its glory below (Hint: Click on the image to see the full graphic):
Healthcare CIO Mindmap

I think that image is enough for anyone to chew on for one day. I’d love to hear your thoughts on it.

April 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 15 blogs containing almost 5000 articles with John having written over 2000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 9.3 million times. John also recently launched two new companies: InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com, and is an advisor to docBeat. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and Google Plus. Healthcare Scene can be found on Google+ as well.